IEEE Spectrum

Volume 24 Issue 8 • Aug. 1987

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c1
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (13627 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front inside cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c2
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (13029 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):1 - 2
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (12390 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • News log

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 3
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (4168 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):4 - 5
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (4398 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 6
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (754 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 7
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (639 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Speakout

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):8 - 11
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11910 KB)

    The U.S. government has criticized the dissemination of certain unclassified high-technology information at technical conferences even though these conferences improve productivity. The Government fears that free discussion of information will reduce U.S. competitiveness. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):12 - 15
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (23433 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Software reviews

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 16
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (40096 KB)

    Presents information and reviews on the latest computer and engineering technologies and software products. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Faults & failures

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 17
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2099 KB)

    In April, Intel Corp., Santa Clara, Calif., discovered that its 80386 microprocessor multiplied certain 32-bit numbers incorrectly under particular operating conditions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The engineer at large

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):18 - 19
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (2628 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Innovationspatents, processes, and products

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):20 - 21
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (9840 KB)

    Complementary logic devices — that is, devices that use currents both of electrons and of holes — have long been a goal of researchers designing gallium arsenide (GaAs) compound semiconductor devices. In silicon technology, the advent of complementary logic devices in the late 1960s cut those integrated circuits' need for power. Chips generated less heat, and so could be packed more closely togeth... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Program notes software news

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):22 - 23
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (7794 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Video programs and technology

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):24 - 26
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (15436 KB)

    A fiberoptic window — a bundle of 6-micrometer diameter fibers — lets a charge-coupled device camera from EG&G Reticon, Sunnyvale, Calif., process images of objects as much as 270 meters away. The MC9128 camera's window conducts light transmitted by the fiberoptic cable onto a 128-by-128-picture-element sensor area [above]. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Age as a pejorative: Ethics: More talk, less action: The technological war

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 27
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (822 KB)

    In sports, as in business, winning is everything. Sports-writers, the approximate equivalent of stock analysts, are continually giving advice to team owners and managers. They tell them who to trade and who to keep. Above all, they worry ceaselessly about the age of the players. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Why most U.S. students can't get into engineering school: Math and science courses are poorly taught and sometimes unavailable, but innovative programs may win more college admissions

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):28 - 31
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11919 KB)

    The teaching of mathematics and science in elementary schools is examined, and the deficiencies pinpointed. Various approaches to remedy the situation are considered. The need to educate the teachers themselves in science and mathematics is explored. New tools that are available are discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • It was the driver and the driven: Electrotechnology helped win the war; in turn, the pressures of battle sharply accelerated electrotechnical developments

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):32 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (41271 KB)

    The synergy between electrotechnology and the military needs of World War II is examined. The development and use of radar is discussed, and eavesdropping and jamming activity is described. The rise of the military-industrial complex is sketched. Finally, the way in which strategy changed in response to technological developments is discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Detecting the enemy: Penetrating darkness and cloud cover, radar was the no. 1 method for pinpointing the adversary in the air or at sea

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):37 - 41
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (23930 KB)

    The technological developments that gave the Allied Powers a strong lead in the use of radar during World War II are described. Of particular importance was the cavity magnetron, which made microwave radar possible. The use of radar against German U-boats, which approached the surface to avoid sonar detection, and for air defense is discussed. Radar countermeasures are described. The use of false ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Targeting the enemy: Radar, radio control and inertial-guidance systems helped improve the accuracy of both offensive and defensive weaponry

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):42 - 49
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (59787 KB)

    The author describes how radar, radio control and inertial-guidance systems helped improve the accuracy of both offensive and defensive weaponry during World War II. The inaccuracy of Britain's bombing efforts at the beginning of the war, as well as the need to attack ships and submarines, and to aim and control antiaircraft guns on land, at sea, and in the air motivated these technologies. A sket... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The silver screen blossoms into color: Like it or not, old favorites like the maltese falcon are being colorized; here's how it's done

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):50 - 55
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (28923 KB)

    The general process using computer based graphics by which color is being added to black-and-white films is discussed. The differences in techniques used by the various companies adding the colorizing are described. The profitability of this technology is examined. Other applications are briefly considered. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Twelve prestigious awards are announced: Winners of the IEEE's specialist awards cover the fields of precision measurements, power transmission and distribution, electromagnetics, and supercomputer compilers

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):56 - 57
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (6404 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • EEs' tools & toys

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):58 - 59
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (4280 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Papers are invited

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 60
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (922 KB)
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Calendar

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):61 - 62
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (3808 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine