IEEE Spectrum

Volume 24 Issue 2 • Feb. 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c1
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  • [Front inside cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c2
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 3
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):4 - 5
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):6 - 13
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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):14 - 16
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  • Speakout

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 17
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (782 KB)

    It has long been the Commission's view that the initial responsibility for signal protection should be on the signal originator, who is in the best position to protect the signal against unauthorized reception and use — Federal Communications Commission, 89 FCC 2d 455 (1982) View full abstract»

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  • The engineer at large

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):18 - 19
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  • Innovations patents, processes, and products

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):20 - 21
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    Protection from laser beams Human eyes, and such light-sensitive detectors as cameras and lenses, are vulnerable to intense laser beams. Two consultants, Vincent McKoy and Amitave Gupta, were awarded U.S. patent 4 622174 on Nov. 11,1986, for a shield that allows harmless broadband light beams to pass through while absorbing and blocking the narrow spectral band containing the harmful laser power. ... View full abstract»

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  • Program notes software news

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):22 - 23
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  • Video programs and technology

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):23 - 26
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  • Spectral lines: One flight too many

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 27
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2017 KB)

    Those aware of how the shuttle's boosters could fail were not surprised when flight 51-L, carrying the Challenger spacecraft, exploded. During previous launches they had held their breath through the critical boost phase and cheered when the boosters and fuel tank had been successfully jettisoned — as most of us do when a high-risk adventure meets with success. View full abstract»

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  • The Sergeant York gun: A massive misfire: The U.S. Department of Defense spent $1.9 billion on developing the computer-controlled, radar-directed air defense system before halting the program

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):28 - 35
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    The author describes this computer-controlled, radar-directed air defense system and examines the reasons why the US Department of Defense halted the program after spending $1.9 billion on it. He examines the difficulties that fueled criticism by the media and US Congress, and explores the lessons to be learned from the project. View full abstract»

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  • The fatal flaw in flight 51–1: Events leading up to the ill-fated challenger launch proved more of a surprise than the disaster itself for what they revealed of NASA's inability to correct obvious design errors

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):36 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    The history of the flawed joint that caused the NASA Challenger space shuttle disaster is examined, showing the sequence of events that led to its development and certification. Then the Challenger launch itself is described, and a number of questions are raised. The lessons to be learned from the accident are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Challenger's final hours

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):37 - 39
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  • The history of the flawed joint

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):39 - 44
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    NASA began to solicit proposals for the design of a solid-fuel rocket motor for the space shuttle in July 1973. By the fall, NASA had received proposals from Aerojet Solid Propulsion Co., Lockheed Propulsion Co., Thiokol Inc. (later Morton-Thiokol Inc.), and United Technologies Corp. View full abstract»

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  • Anatomy of a tragedy

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):44 - 51
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    Six days after the Challenger disaster, on Feb. 3,1986, President Reagan appointed a commission and charged it with reviewing the accident's circumstances, determining its probable cause, and recommending measures toward preventing another such disaster. Known as the Rogers commission after its chairman, former Secretary of State William P. Rogers, it had 120 days to work. View full abstract»

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  • Coherent optical detection: A thousand calls on one circuit: Dazzling applications for both long-distance and local networks are in the offing as experimental systems adapt long-successful radio techniques

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):52 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    The reasons why coherent detection of laser signals may well turn out to be the next great advance in optical communications are examined. The operation of coherent systems is described, and signal modulation and its effect on the ratio of separation to width are considered. Research on how to deal with the wide spectral lines of semiconductor lasers is discussed, and the outlook for increased sen... View full abstract»

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  • Designing micro-based systems for fail-safe travel: For reliable control of railroads, aircraft, and space vehicles, designers are harnessing the power of the microprocessor

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):58 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    The use of microprocessors to provide safe, reliable control of railroads, aircraft, and space vehicles, is explored. Some classic examples of safety glitches are briefly described, and preventive measures in hardware and software to eliminate such problems are described. Applications to planes, trains, and spacecraft are examined. View full abstract»

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  • Winchester disks reach for a gigabyte: Poised for a 200-fold increase in capacity over initial models of six years ago, 5 1/4-inch hard disks are emerging as major elements for small-system designs

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):64 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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  • EEs' tools & toys

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):68 - 69
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  • Calendar

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):70 - 75
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  • IEEE tables of contents for current and future publications

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):76 - 77
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  • Papers are invited

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 78
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