Volume 38 Issue 10 • Oct. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Biological warfare canaries [biological attack detection]

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):35 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (12)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (706 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A full-blown biological attack would come unannounced and spread inordinate disease and death. A bioattack could take days or weeks to surface, until enough illness and deaths have occurred for public health officials to realize what has happened. In this paper, the author describes new early-warning detectors which aim to avert such a catastrophe. View full abstract»

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  • Making music pay [digital music distribution]

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):41 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (9)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The author argues that free Napster-style music sharing is on its way out. He believes that the future of digital music distribution will be determined by consumers voting with their purses for a single, or at most two, systems, just as they did with videotape formats and PC operating systems. Napster offered immediate gratification; regaining it will cost some privacy as well as money. As compani... View full abstract»

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  • In search of transparent networks

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):47 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (266 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Optical transmission networks work well, but their switchgear is opaque in that it must convert signals to electronic form before routing them. In this paper, the author presents a look at how the candidate technologies for all-optical, or transparent, switching work and stack up against each other. View full abstract»

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  • Operating in neutral [digital music legislation]

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):52 - 57
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (815 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The law suit against Napster Inc. may affect the development of peer-to-peer technology for years to come. In this paper, the author describes how, playing a pivotal role in the case is electrical engineer A.J. Nichols: appointed by the court as a neutral expert, he is the judge's sole nonpartisan advisor on the technical questions raised. View full abstract»

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  • Hackers, hot rods, and the information drag strip

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):14 - 17
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (109 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Over the last decade, automobiles have become increasingly digital. High-end vehicles have dozens of microcontrollers (MCs), and even the simplest "econoboxes" have as many as 10. These MCs range from the simplest measurement and response systems to general-purpose central processing units. More importantly, all of the sensors, actuators, and MCs are hooked into one of three styles of networks, as... View full abstract»

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  • A new world of terror

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):24 - 25
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At first glance, at least, it seems the array of counter terrorism technologies under development in the United States and elsewhere would have been useless to prevent the 11 September attacks. Neither airport detectors that can sense plastic weapons and explosives nor state-of-the-art sensors that could ferret out the chemicals, biological agents, or nuclear materials of mass destruction would ha... View full abstract»

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