Volume 38 Issue 8 • Aug. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Mining asteroids

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):34 - 39
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (607 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Melting trapped ice on near Earth objects (dormant comets, asteroids) could turn a profit for private companies, with metal processing not far behind. Elaborate plans have been drawn up for NEO missions. In a typical plan, a ship departs Earth for an asteroid when the two bodies' orbits are such that the lowest change in velocity, /spl Delta/V, is required. Mining operations might last many months... View full abstract»

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  • Fiber optics without fiber

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):40 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (60)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (925 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Low-power infrared beams, which do not harm the eyes, are the means by which free-space optics (FSO) technology transmits data through the air between transceivers, or link heads, mounted on roof-tops or behind windows. It works over distances of several hundred meters to a few kilometers, depending upon atmospheric conditions. The authors believe that FSO could be the ultimate solution for high-s... View full abstract»

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  • Packages go vertical

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):46 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (213 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Stacking different chips in a package tucks a complete system into implantable devices like hearing aids. In this paper, the author describes how cell phones and wearable computers could be next. View full abstract»

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  • Take off, plug in, dial up [aicraft personal communication]

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (310 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The author describes how commercial airlines are now looking to deploy a slew of new in-flight technologies for business as well as entertainment. He explains how e-mail, Web surfing, cell phones and more will be coming to a plane near you. View full abstract»

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  • Who Pays For Artificial Hearts?

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):9 - 11
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  • Why Microsoft smears-and fears-open source

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):14 - 15
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (32 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Late in March, Microsoft Corp. escalated its war on open-source code by launching a propaganda campaign aimed at top executives. Through speeches and press conferences it painted Linux and related technologies as "un-American" and "a cancer". The author describes how Microsoft's intention was to persuade software customers not to dare use or even touch open-source code because it might pollute the... View full abstract»

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  • In-vehicle cell phones: smoke, but where's the fire?

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):16 - 18
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (78 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The debate now raging around cellular telephone use by drivers is highly emotional, as cities and states consider steps to ban or seriously restrict their use. The rush to judgement-and legislation-is too hasty. It is not at all clear if using a cell phone in a moving vehicle is significantly more risky than such tasks as adjusting the radio, drinking coffee, or talking with a passenger. The issue... View full abstract»

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  • Is hyperlinking to decryption software illegal?

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):64 - 65
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (48 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Is a computer program a form of speech, protected in the United States under the First Amendment of its Constitution, or is it a device? In a case now under appeal, a federal court in New York City ruled that so called DeCSS software $computer code that breaks the encryption scheme of DVDs - while deemed speech of a sort, does not merit the constitutional protection afforded to "pure expression." ... View full abstract»

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  • Cuddling up to robots

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):66 - 67
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  • Measurement by imperial decree

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s): 80
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  • The disposable battery [Review - Power to the Phones]

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):68 - 69
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The refillable recharger [Review - Power to the Phones]

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s): 69
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    Freely Available from IEEE

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