Volume 37 Issue 2 • Feb. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • The angry genie: one man's walk through the nuclear age [Books]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):12 - 14
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Undue risks: secret state experiments on humans

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):14 - 16
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  • 'Look, no hands' signal analysis [Software Reviews]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 24
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • What is evolutionary computation?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):26 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (81)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB)

    Taking a page from Darwin's 'On the origin of the species', computer scientists have found ways to evolve solutions to complex problems. Harnessing the evolutionary process within a computer provides a means for addressing complex engineering problems-ones involving chaotic disturbances, randomness, and complex nonlinear dynamics-that traditional algorithms have been unable to conquer. Indeed, the... View full abstract»

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  • Magnetoelectronic memories last and last

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):33 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (24)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1158 KB)

    Nonvolatile RAMs built with thin films of ferromagnetic material are poised to challenge dynamic and nonvolatile memories based on conventional semiconductors. At the root of the excitement are electronic devices with a ferromagnetic component that lets them not only switch between two stable states in one clock cycle but also retain the state they are in when power is removed. The compact design ... View full abstract»

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  • Personal locator services emerge

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):41 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (62)  |  Patents (85)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1038 KB)

    Finding a mentally impaired relative, a lost child, or a criminal in a sprawling metropolitan area would be simple if the person were equipped with a personal locator device. The belief that it should be easy to find anyone, anywhere, at any time with a few pushes of a button has caught on with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS). People imagine a miniature device, attached to one's ... View full abstract»

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  • Instrumentation: the quiet revolution

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):49 - 51
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    The author describes how, while dot-coms get the headlines, instrument companies have remade themselves and are profiting right now from the communications boom. View full abstract»

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  • Jon Rubinstein [biography]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):52 - 57
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    The author examines the career of Jon Rubinstein, an electronics engineer whose talent for designing computers has seen him employed by many of the world's leading computer manufacturers. View full abstract»

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  • A backward glance. Arriving at the punched-card system

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):58 - 61
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (190 KB)

    Herman Hollerith's punched-card machine for the US Census office consisted of: a bank of counters for tabulating results; a hand-operated reader that pushed wire contacts through the holes in the card into pools of mercury, completing an electrical circuit; and a sorting box with bins for holding the cards after they were read. An historical overview of this technology is presented by the author i... View full abstract»

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