Includes the top 50 most frequently accessed documents for this publication according to the usage statistics for the month of

  • Can you program ethics into a self-driving car?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):28 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (10396 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    IT'S 2034. A drunken man walking along a sidewalk at night trips and falls directly in front of a driverless car, which strikes him square on, killing him instantly. Had a human been at the wheel, the death would have been considered an accident because the pedestrian was clearly at fault and no reasonable person could have swerved in time. But the "reasonable person" legal standard for driver neg... View full abstract»

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  • Blockchain world - Do you need a blockchain? This chart will tell you if the technology can solve your problem

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):38 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (498 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    According to a study released this July by Juniper Research, more than half the world's largest companies are now researching blockchain technologies with the goal of integrating them into their products. Projects are already under way that will disrupt the management of health care records, property titles, supply chains, and even our online identities. But before we remount the entire digital ec... View full abstract»

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  • Self-driving cars and the law

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):46 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5351 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    It is the year 2023, and for the first time, a self-driving car navigating city streets strikes and kills a pedestrian. A lawsuit is sure to follow. But exactly what laws will apply? Nobody knows. Today, the law is scrambling to keep up with the technology, which is moving forward at a breakneck pace, thanks to efforts by Apple, Audi, BMW, Ford, General Motors, Google, Honda, Mercedes, Nissan, Nvi... View full abstract»

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  • Moore's law: past, present and future

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (359)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2810 KB)

    A simple observation, made over 30 years ago, on the growth in the number of devices per silicon die has become the central driving force of one of the most dynamic of the world's industries. Because of the accuracy with which Moore's Law has predicted past growth in IC complexity, it is viewed as a reliable method of calculating future trends as well, setting the pace of innovation, and defining ... View full abstract»

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  • The rise of the body bots [robotic exoskeletons]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):50 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (101)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2824 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper discusses the current status of the research and development on robotic exoskeletons for both commercial and military applications in Japan and the US. Designed to help elderly and disabled people walk, climb stairs, and carry things around, the Japanese exoskeleton, called HAL-5, is set to hit the market in November 2005. Meanwhile, in the US, the most advanced exoskeleton projects are... View full abstract»

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  • Blockchains: How they work and why they'll change the world

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):26 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5423 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bitcoin was hatched as an act of defiance. Unleashed in the wake of the Great Recession, the cryptocurrency was touted by its early champions as an antidote to the inequities and corruption of the traditional financial system. They cherished the belief that as this parallel currency took off, it would compete with and ultimately dismantle the institutions that had brought about the crisis. Bitcoin... View full abstract»

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  • The lost history of the transistor

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):44 - 49
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3103 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bell Labs is famous for inventing the transistor. But 50 years ago Texas Instruments unveiled the first commercial silicon transistors - launching the electronics industry on its meteoric rise. View full abstract»

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  • This is how a pathologist could save your life

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):24 - 29
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (10815 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Imagine you're coughing up blood, and a chest scan reveals a suspicious mass in your lungs. A surgeon removes a small cylindrical sample from the potential tumor, and the pathologist places very thin slices of the tissue on glass slides. After preserving and staining the tissue, the pathologist peers through a microscope and sees that the cells have the telltale signs of lung cancer. You start tre... View full abstract»

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  • The Internet of disposable things: Throwaway paper and plastic sensors will connect everyday items

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):30 - 35
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4503 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The Year is 2028. It's 8 P.M. On a Wednesday night and you're famished. You're staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you'd have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the pac... View full abstract»

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  • Who killed the virtual case file? [case management software]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):24 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11485 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper discusses how the FBI's $170 million Virtual Case File (VCF) IT project became one of the most highly publicized software failure in history. According to a report by the US Department of Justice's inspector general, VCF's failure may be attributed to several factors including poorly defined and slowly evolving design requirements, overly ambitious schedules, and the lack of a plan to g... View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive Cameras - [Opinion]

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s): 16
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (607 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    NOVEMBER'S INTERNET OF EVERYTHING COLUMN discussed the need to rethink cameras for an era of always-on operation at every corner. We'll also have to rethink the way those cameras see. • Today, computer vision can track cars, faces, and production processes as accurately as most people can. When there's a lot of data to sift through, computer-vision models are better than people. • But there are li... View full abstract»

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  • Energy trading for fun and profit buy your neighbor's rooftop solar power or sell your own-it'll all be on a blockchain

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):56 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3214 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Would you pay slightly more for your electricity if you knew it was sourced from photovoltaic panels on your neighbor's roof? Or, if you are that neighbor, would you use your solar power to charge a battery and dump that energy back onto the grid at peak hours, when the price was highest? The answers to these questions-which depend on how people would behave in an open energy market-are unknown, b... View full abstract»

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  • How We Found The Missing Memristor

    Publication Year: 2008, Page(s):28 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (169)  |  Patents (29)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6398 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This article discusses the development of a memristor and how it works. A memristor is a contraction of a memory resistor and is a two-terminal device whose resistance depends on the voltage applied to it and the length of time that voltage has been applied. This device remembers its history, that is, when you turn off the voltage, the memristor remembers its most recent resistance until the next ... View full abstract»

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  • AI in the ICU: In the intensive care unit, artificial intelligence can keep watch

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):31 - 35
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    IN A HOSPITAL'S INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU), the sickest patients receive round-the-clock care as they lie in beds with their bodies connected to a bevy of surrounding machines. This advanced medical equipment is designed to keep an ailing person alive. Intravenous fluids drip into the bloodstream, while mechanical ventilators push air into the lungs. Sensors attached to the body track heart rate, b... View full abstract»

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  • Can we trust computer with body-cam vidio? Police departments are being led to believe AI will help, but they should be wary

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):36 - 48
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11995 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    On 17 July 2014, a group of New York City police officers approached 43-year-old Eric Garner on a Staten Island sidewalk and attempted to arrest him-for allegedly selling cigarettes illegally. When Garner pulled free, one officer wrapped an arm around Garner's neck, forced him to the ground, and pressed his face into the sidewalk. Garner, who had asthma and heart disease, repeatedly pleaded, "I ca... View full abstract»

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  • The real story of stuxnet

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (59)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3808 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The paper discusses how Kaspersky Lab tracked down the malware that stymied Iran's nuclear-fuel enrichment program. View full abstract»

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  • Red light, green light—no light: Tomorrow's communicative cars could take turns at intersections

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):24 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1864 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    · Life is short, and it seems shorter still when you're in a traffic jam. Or sitting at a red light when there's no cross traffic at all. · In Mexico City, São Paolo, Rome, Moscow, Beijing, Cairo, and Nairobi, the morning commute can, for many exurbanites, exceed 2 hours. Include the evening commute and it is not unusual to spend 3 or 4 hours on the road every day. · Now suppose we could develop a... View full abstract»

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  • Driving tests for self-driving cars

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):40 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7782 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At a test track east of Gothenburg, Sweden, people are ushered into autonomous vehicles for a test drive. But there's a twist: The vehicles aren't actually autonomous-there's a hidden driver in the back-and the people are participating in an experiment to discover how they'll behave when the car is chauffeuring them around. At Zenuity-a joint venture between Volvo and Autoliv, a Swedish auto-safet... View full abstract»

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  • Three Engineers, Hundreds of Robots, One Warehouse

    Publication Year: 2008, Page(s):26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (81)  |  Patents (14)
    Request permission for reuse | PDF file iconPDF (19453 KB) | HTML iconHTML
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  • A Tesla in every garage?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):34 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5679 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Last summer, as I drove around the San Francisco Peninsula, I caught glimpses of a sea change in American automobile culture. Plug-in electric vehicles and charging stations seemed to be everywhere. Near the entrance to Stanford University, I witnessed a three-car fender bender involving only electric cars. And perhaps most remarkable: the prevalence of the Tesla Motors Model S, a luxury electric ... View full abstract»

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  • Blockchain world - Feeding the blockchain beast if bitcoin ever does go mainstream, the electricity needed to sustain it will be enormous

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):36 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2163 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bitcoin "miners" are electromagnetic alchemists, effectively turning megawatt-hours of electricity into the world's fastest-growing currency. Their intensive computational activity cryptographically secures the virtual currency, approves transactions, and, in the process, creates new bitcoins for the miners, as payment. And it does another thing, too: It uses an absolutely stunning amount of power... View full abstract»

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  • To solve optimization problems, just add lasers: An ODD device known as an optical ising machine could untangle tricky logistics

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):42 - 47
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3596 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Last December, a glitch in the crew-scheduling system for American Airlines threatened to disrupt thousands of flights over the holiday season. The error allowed pilots to drop flights without requiring another pilot to cover for them, imperiling as many as 15,000 trips. And while the airline managed to spot the problem and staff the flights, the snafu was a reminder of how much we depend on compu... View full abstract»

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  • The blossoming of the blockchain

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):24 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4990 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    When bitcoin was unleashed on the world eight years ago, it filled a specific need, for a digital currency that wasn't under anybody's control. But it wasn't long before people realized the technology behind Bitcoin-the blockchain-could do much more than record monetary transactions. That realization has lately blossomed into a dazzling and often bewildering array of startup companies, initiatives... View full abstract»

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  • Faster than a speeding bullet train

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):30 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1824 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    China is throttling up a 430-km/h magnetically levitated train to link Shanghai and its airport. Built in China by a trio of German companies and the Shanghai Maglev Transportation Development Co., it reaches 430 km/h (268 mi/h)-130 km/h faster than Japan's famous bullet train. And even as it goes faster than any commercial vehicle without wings, the Chinese train is smoother and quieter than Amtr... View full abstract»

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  • Smart buildings

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (52)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2433 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Can building automation systems overcome interoperability problems to assert control over our offices, hotels, and airports? Efforts to make buildings smarter are focusing on cutting costs by streamlining building operations like air conditioning and lighting. Building automation is critical to these efforts, mainly because it could reduce the annual operating costs of buildings. This article outl... View full abstract»

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