Includes the top 50 most frequently accessed documents for this publication according to the usage statistics for the month of

  • Can you program ethics into a self-driving car?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):28 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (10396 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    IT'S 2034. A drunken man walking along a sidewalk at night trips and falls directly in front of a driverless car, which strikes him square on, killing him instantly. Had a human been at the wheel, the death would have been considered an accident because the pedestrian was clearly at fault and no reasonable person could have swerved in time. But the "reasonable person" legal standard for driver neg... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hack a safer bike light projecting light onto the ground makes a bicyclist easy to spot [Resources_Hands On]

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):17 - 18
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2253 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    I live less than a mile from the campus of the University of North Carolina, in Chapel Hill. Not surprisingly, many of the nearly 30,000 students enrolled there get around town on bicycles, day and night. I bike, too, but seldom do I go out after dark: I fear it's just too dangerous. This feeling about the perils of nighttime cycling are shaped by my experiences as a driver. I often find myself ap... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Building a safer, denser lithium-ion battery

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):34 - 39
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4057 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Hardly a month passes without shocking news of lithium-ion batteries catching fire: Laptops are torched, airlines are grounded, hoverboards go up in flames. The 2016 fires inside Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 smartphone led to a US $5 billion recall and then to a discontinuation of the model, moves that together cut Samsung's market capitalization by many billions. In January 2017, after months of specu... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Self-driving cars and the law

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):46 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5351 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    It is the year 2023, and for the first time, a self-driving car navigating city streets strikes and kills a pedestrian. A lawsuit is sure to follow. But exactly what laws will apply? Nobody knows. Today, the law is scrambling to keep up with the technology, which is moving forward at a breakneck pace, thanks to efforts by Apple, Audi, BMW, Ford, General Motors, Google, Honda, Mercedes, Nissan, Nvi... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • San Diego's streetlights get smart

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):30 - 31
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (374 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    None of the people walking around San Diego's East Village neighborhood one recent afternoon were looking up at the streetlights (except me). And if they had, they likely wouldn't have noticed that some of these lights were a little thicker around the middle than others, or that some lanterns topping old-style lampposts had a clear glass panel here and there. But unbeknownst to the people below, t... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Blockchain world - Do you need a blockchain? This chart will tell you if the technology can solve your problem

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):38 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (498 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    According to a study released this July by Juniper Research, more than half the world's largest companies are now researching blockchain technologies with the goal of integrating them into their products. Projects are already under way that will disrupt the management of health care records, property titles, supply chains, and even our online identities. But before we remount the entire digital ec... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • What watts from yonder window flow?

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):27 - 51
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7127 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The view from the office of Ioannis Papakonstantinou at University College London affords a great perspective on a wasted opportunity. He points to the university hospital, a tall oblong block adorned with decorative green glass strips. They look modern but serve no purpose. They don’t even let in light. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Why software fails [software failure]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (230)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (9468 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Most IT experts agree that software failures occur far more often than they should despite the fact that, for the most part, they are predictable and avoidable. It is unfortunate that most organizations don't see preventing failure as an urgent matter, even though that view risks harming the organization and maybe even destroying it. Because software failure has tremendous implications for busines... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hyperloop: No pressure

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):51 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5926 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 2013, Elon Musk had an idea. He would propel passengers in a pod through an evacuated tube at nearly the speed of sound, hurtling them from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 30 minutes. It's a lot quicker than the 2 hours and 40 minutes of the rival technology, a proposed high-speed train. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Not so fast: Electric car: Mazda has improved the gasoline engine to a level that even Tesla should respect

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):20 - 25
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2424 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    THERE ARE LOTS OF REASONS why we're not all driving electric vehicles now. You've probably thought of two or three already, but let me add one that I'm sure you haven't. It's a big obstacle to EVs, and it's rarely remarked upon. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Driving tests for self-driving cars

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):40 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7782 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At a test track east of Gothenburg, Sweden, people are ushered into autonomous vehicles for a test drive. But there's a twist: The vehicles aren't actually autonomous-there's a hidden driver in the back-and the people are participating in an experiment to discover how they'll behave when the car is chauffeuring them around. At Zenuity-a joint venture between Volvo and Autoliv, a Swedish auto-safet... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Red light, green light—no light: Tomorrow's communicative cars could take turns at intersections

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):24 - 29
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1864 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    · Life is short, and it seems shorter still when you're in a traffic jam. Or sitting at a red light when there's no cross traffic at all. · In Mexico City, São Paolo, Rome, Moscow, Beijing, Cairo, and Nairobi, the morning commute can, for many exurbanites, exceed 2 hours. Include the evening commute and it is not unusual to spend 3 or 4 hours on the road every day. · Now suppose we could develop a... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mind games

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):40 - 41
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (938 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    "Wake up, this is not a test," intones a voice as the virtual reality game Awakening begins. Your game character is a child trapped in a nefarious government lab, and as you scan the room you see a variety of objects lying on the floor, each flashing with light. You focus your mental attention on a block, and it rises up and rotates in the air before you. Then you focus on a mirror on the wall, an... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The real story of stuxnet

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (53)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3808 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The paper discusses how Kaspersky Lab tracked down the malware that stymied Iran's nuclear-fuel enrichment program. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Blockchains: How they work and why they'll change the world

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):26 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5423 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bitcoin was hatched as an act of defiance. Unleashed in the wake of the Great Recession, the cryptocurrency was touted by its early champions as an antidote to the inequities and corruption of the traditional financial system. They cherished the belief that as this parallel currency took off, it would compete with and ultimately dismantle the institutions that had brought about the crisis. Bitcoin... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • AI in the ICU: In the intensive care unit, artificial intelligence can keep watch

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):31 - 35
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    IN A HOSPITAL'S INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU), the sickest patients receive round-the-clock care as they lie in beds with their bodies connected to a bevy of surrounding machines. This advanced medical equipment is designed to keep an ailing person alive. Intravenous fluids drip into the bloodstream, while mechanical ventilators push air into the lungs. Sensors attached to the body track heart rate, b... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Moore's law: past, present and future

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (348)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2810 KB)

    A simple observation, made over 30 years ago, on the growth in the number of devices per silicon die has become the central driving force of one of the most dynamic of the world's industries. Because of the accuracy with which Moore's Law has predicted past growth in IC complexity, it is viewed as a reliable method of calculating future trends as well, setting the pace of innovation, and defining ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The great Soviet calculator hack: Programmable calculators and a sci-fi story brought Soviet teens into the digital age

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):42 - 47
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11027 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    DESPITE THE UBIQUITY of computers in modern society, the vast majority of today's students never study computer science or computer programming. Those who are exposed to these subjects typically learn low-level skills rather than undertaking any deeper exploration of computational concepts or theory. In earlier decades, a few countries did promote computer education at the national level. In the 1... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Quantum computing: Both here and not here

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):42 - 47
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (8002 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Schrodinger's famous thought experiment has come to life in a new form because quantum researchers are at the cusp of a long-sought accomplishment: creating a quantum computer that can do something no traditional computer can match. They've spent years battling naysayers who insisted that a quantum computer was an unachievable sci-fi fantasy, and now these researchers are finally beginning to indu... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recommended for you

    Publication Year: 2012, Page(s):54 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6596 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    One morning in April, we each directed our browsers to Amazon.com's website. Not only did the site greet us by name, the home page opened with a host of suggested purchases. It directed Joe to Barry Greenstein's Ace on the River: An Advanced Poker Guide, Jonah Lehrer's Imagine: How Creativity Works, and Michael Lewis's Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World. For John it selected Dave Barry's On... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How We Found The Missing Memristor

    Publication Year: 2008, Page(s):28 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (166)  |  Patents (29)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6398 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This article discusses the development of a memristor and how it works. A memristor is a contraction of a memory resistor and is a two-terminal device whose resistance depends on the voltage applied to it and the length of time that voltage has been applied. This device remembers its history, that is, when you turn off the voltage, the memristor remembers its most recent resistance until the next ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Tesla in every garage?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):34 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5679 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Last summer, as I drove around the San Francisco Peninsula, I caught glimpses of a sea change in American automobile culture. Plug-in electric vehicles and charging stations seemed to be everywhere. Near the entrance to Stanford University, I witnessed a three-car fender bender involving only electric cars. And perhaps most remarkable: the prevalence of the Tesla Motors Model S, a luxury electric ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The frugal factory - [Internet of Everything_by Stacey Higginbotham - Opinion]

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s): 22
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (86 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    THE NEXT BIG EFFORT to reduce carbon emissions and hold the line on climate change will be enabled by the Internet of Things. Companies can rethink their costs of operations, taking into account the energy used, with a combination of more granular data from cheap sensors and faster, more in-depth analytics from cheap computing. • At Schneider Electric's factory in Lexington, Ky., workers make elec... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Blockchain world - Feeding the blockchain beast if bitcoin ever does go mainstream, the electricity needed to sustain it will be enormous

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):36 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2163 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bitcoin "miners" are electromagnetic alchemists, effectively turning megawatt-hours of electricity into the world's fastest-growing currency. Their intensive computational activity cryptographically secures the virtual currency, approves transactions, and, in the process, creates new bitcoins for the miners, as payment. And it does another thing, too: It uses an absolutely stunning amount of power... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The puzzle of police body cams

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):32 - 37
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5541 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Police body cameras are popping up everywhere, often to good effect because both police and suspects normally behave better in their presence. No wonder these small devices, enthusiastically endorsed by police, politicians, and civil-rights advocates, have generated a burgeoning industry. Yet people know very little about how and why they work, so the intended and unintended consequences of using ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Deep learning reinvents the hearing aid

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):32 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5377 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    To produce a better experience for hearing aid wearers, the author's lab at Ohio State University, in Columbus, recently applied machine learning based on deep neural networks to the task of segregating sounds. They have tested multiple versions of a digital filter that not only amplifies sound but can also isolate speech from background noise and automatically adjust the volumes of each separatel... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Energy trading for fun and profit buy your neighbor's rooftop solar power or sell your own-it'll all be on a blockchain

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):56 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3214 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Would you pay slightly more for your electricity if you knew it was sourced from photovoltaic panels on your neighbor's roof? Or, if you are that neighbor, would you use your solar power to charge a battery and dump that energy back onto the grid at peak hours, when the price was highest? The answers to these questions-which depend on how people would behave in an open energy market-are unknown, b... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Medical delivery drones take flight in east africa

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):34 - 35
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    While Amazon and United Parcel Service pour considerable resources into finding ways of using drones to deliver such things as shoes and dog treats, Zipline has been saving lives in Rwanda since October 2016 with drones that deliver blood. Zipline's autonomous fixedwing drones now form an integral part of Rwanda's medical-supply infrastructure, transporting blood products from a central distributi... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Silicon photonics' last-meter problem: Economics and physics still pose challenges to "fiber to the processor" tech

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):38 - 43
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (10007 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    If you think we're on the cusp of a technological revolution today, imagine what it felt like in the mid-1980s. Silicon chips used transistors with micrometer-size features. Fiber-optic systems were zipping trillions of bits per second around the world. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The real-life dangers of augmented reality

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2200 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    You know your cellphone can distract you and that you shouldn't be texting or surfing the Web while walking down a crowded street or driving a car. Augmented reality- in the form of Google Glass, Sony's SmartEyeglass, or Microsoft HoloLens- may appear to solve that problem. These devices present contextual information transparently or in a way that obscures little, seemingly letting you navigate t... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Saving software from oblivion

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):36 - 41
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4874 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In early 2010, Harvard economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff published an analysis of economic data from many countries and concluded that when debt levels exceed 90 percent of gross national product, a nation's economic growth is threatened. With debt that high, expect growth to become negative, they argued. □ This analysis was done shortly after the 2008 recession, so it had enormous rel... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The blossoming of the blockchain

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):24 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4990 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    When bitcoin was unleashed on the world eight years ago, it filled a specific need, for a digital currency that wasn't under anybody's control. But it wasn't long before people realized the technology behind Bitcoin-the blockchain-could do much more than record monetary transactions. That realization has lately blossomed into a dazzling and often bewildering array of startup companies, initiatives... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - From animal intelligence to artificial intelligence

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):40 - 45
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6172 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Today's artificial intelligence systems can destroy human champions at sophisticated games like chess, Go, and Texas Hold 'em. In flight simulators, they can shoot down top fighter pilots. They're surpassing human doctors with more precise surgical stitching and more accurate cancer diagnoses. But there are some situations when a 3-year-old can easily defeat the fanciest AI in the world: when the ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Smart buildings

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (51)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2433 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Can building automation systems overcome interoperability problems to assert control over our offices, hotels, and airports? Efforts to make buildings smarter are focusing on cutting costs by streamlining building operations like air conditioning and lighting. Building automation is critical to these efforts, mainly because it could reduce the annual operating costs of buildings. This article outl... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Nanotechnology: what will it mean?

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):19 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (35 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Nanotechnology will make us healthy and wealthy though not necessarily wise. In a few decades, this emerging manufacturing technology will let us inexpensively arrange atoms and molecules in most of the ways permitted by physical laws. It will let us make supercomputers that fit on the head of a pin and fleets of medical nanorobots smaller than a human cell able to eliminate cancer, infections, cl... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A lighter motor for tomorrow's electric car

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):26 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5293 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    DURING THE FIRST DECADE OF THE 1900s, 38 percent of all cars in the United States ran on electricity, a share that declined to practically zero as the internal combustion engine rose to dominance in the 1920s. Today's drive to save energy and reduce pollution has given the electric car new life, but its high cost and limited range of travel combine to keep sales figures low. Most attempts to solve... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The rise of the body bots [robotic exoskeletons]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):50 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (99)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2824 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper discusses the current status of the research and development on robotic exoskeletons for both commercial and military applications in Japan and the US. Designed to help elderly and disabled people walk, climb stairs, and carry things around, the Japanese exoskeleton, called HAL-5, is set to hit the market in November 2005. Meanwhile, in the US, the most advanced exoskeleton projects are... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Juice from solar concentrate [photovoltaic collector]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):15 - 16
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Conventional photovoltaic (PV) panels made from silicon to provide electricity to office buildings and homes are still too expensive. Unless they are heavily subsidized, it rarely makes sense to install them where electricity is available from the grid. This paper discusses a new type of photovoltaic collector developed by New York state's interdisciplinary team. The key element in their design is... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Air traffic control for delivery drones [Top Tech 2017]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):32 - 33
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (451 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 2013, shortly before Christmas, Amazon.com released a video depicting its plans to speed packages to their destinations using small drones. Some commentators said it was just a publicity stunt. But the notion began to seem less far-fetched when Google revealed its own drone-based delivery effort in 2014, something it calls Project Wing. And in the early months of 2016, DHL actually integrated d... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Top 11 technologies of the decade

    Publication Year: 2011, Page(s):27 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (37785 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The most powerful technologies take a while to mature. But when they do, they can rapidly retire mainstays that are decades old. Given in this paper are the top 11 technologies of the decade which are smartphones, social networking, voice over IP, LED lighting, multicore CPU, cloud computing, drone aircraft, planetary rovers, flexible AC transmission, digital photography and class-D audio. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • What's wrong with weapons acquisitions?

    Publication Year: 2008, Page(s):33 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4800 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The paper gives an overview of a problem in weapons acquisition in the U.S. army. The paper focuses on problem in the proposed aerial common sensor aircraft (ACS). U.S.Army desperately needed the ACS to replace its Guardrails, a fleet of small, piloted reconnaissance aircraft that first began flying in the mid-1970s. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Athens Affair

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):26 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (33)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5783 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    How some extremely smart hackers pulled off the most audacious cell-network break-in ever. On 9 march 2005, a 38-year-old Greek electrical engineer named Costas Tsalikidis was found hanged in his Athens loft apartment, an apparent suicide. It would prove to be merely the first public news of a scandal that would roil Greece for months. The next day, the prime minister of Greece was told that his c... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Autonomous ships on the high seas

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):26 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7837 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    It's midnight on the North Atlantic, where a massive container ship receives the latest weather report. There's a nasty storm brewing ahead. Quietly, the ship changes course and speed, to skirt the worst of it and ensure an on-time arrival at its destination. The ship's owners and the harbormaster at its next port of call are advised of the revised route. And as it nears shore, the giant ship must... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Less fire, more power: Without the needlelike growths that can short out cells, lithium-ion batteries will be safer

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):44 - 48
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2620 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES HAVE MADE HEADLINES for the wrong reason: as a fire hazard. Just this past May, three apparent battery fires in Tesla cars were reported in the United States and Switzerland. In the United States alone, a fire in a lithium-ion battery grounds a flight every 10 days on average, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. And the same problem afflicts electronic cigarette... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reverse engineering the brain

    Publication Year: 2008, Page(s):51 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1760 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    What do fruit-fly brains have in common with microchips? That's not the setup for a bad joke; it's David Adler's life. Under Adler's ultrasophisticated electron beam microscopes, advanced microprocessors with transistors far smaller than red blood cells have been reduced to their wiring diagrams. Now the noggin of the humble Drosophila melanogaster is next, as Adler is being courted by researchers... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The automotive future belongs to fuel cells range, adaptability, and refueling time will ultimately put hydrogen fuel cells ahead of batteries

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):38 - 43
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6905 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    You'd have to be completely uninterested in cars or any other type of transportation not to recognize that automobiles are undergoing a major transition. They no longer run solely on internalcombustion engines and burn petroleum-based fuels. Nowadays, consumers routinely purchase vehicles that run in part or entirely on electricity. There are different forces behind this colossal shift. For one, e... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • October 1958: First Boeing 707 to Paris - [Numbers Don't Lie_by Vaclav Smil - Opinion]

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s): 23
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (634 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    DATING THE DAWN OF THE JET AGE is hard because there were so many different “firsts.” The first experimental takeoff of a jet-powered airplane was that of the German Heinkel He 178, in August 1939. The first flight of the first commercial design, the British de Havilland DH 106 Comet, was in July 1949, and its first BOAC commercial flight was in 1952. The Comet, redesigned after catastrophic crash... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rough seas for the superconducting wind turbine: To keep offshore turbines light, engineers look beyond superconductors to a new permanent-magnet tech

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):32 - 39
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (8106 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Try to wrap your head around this: A slender tower stretches 100 meters above the waves. Blades, each one of them nearly 60 meters long, face down the briny spray as they turn about a 250-metric-ton nacelle at the top of the tower, which houses the turbine generator and everything else needed to produce electricity. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The green promise of vertical farms [Blueprints for a Miracle]

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):50 - 55
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7388 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    I EMERGE FROM THE TOKYO Monorail station on Showajima, a small island in Tokyo Bay that's nestled between downtown Tokyo and Haneda Airport. Disoriented and dodging cargo trucks exiting a busy overpass, I duck under a bridge and consult the map on my phone, which leads me deeper into a warren of warehouses. I eventually find Espec Mic Corp.'s VegetaFarm, in a dilapidated 1960s office building tuck... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Three Engineers, Hundreds of Robots, One Warehouse

    Publication Year: 2008, Page(s):26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (77)  |  Patents (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (19453 KB) | HTML iconHTML
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine