Includes the top 50 most frequently accessed documents for this publication according to the usage statistics for the month of

  • The Long Road to Maxwell's Equations

    Publication Year: 2014, Page(s):36 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4656 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Should you wish to pay homage to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell, you wouldn't lack for locales in which to do it. There's a memorial marker in London's Westminster Abbey, not far from Isaac Newton's grave. A magnificent statue was recently installed in Edinburgh, near his birthplace. Or you can pay your respects at his final resting place near Castle Douglas, in southwestern Scotland, a s... View full abstract»

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  • Fold-up screens could make their big debut [Top Tech 2017]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):50 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1074 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The rumors have been swirling for months. Though they couldn’t be confirmed, their persistence suggests that something significant may be coming from Samsung, possibly as early as this year: a foldable mobile. View full abstract»

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  • Can you program ethics into a self-driving car?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):28 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (10396 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    IT'S 2034. A drunken man walking along a sidewalk at night trips and falls directly in front of a driverless car, which strikes him square on, killing him instantly. Had a human been at the wheel, the death would have been considered an accident because the pedestrian was clearly at fault and no reasonable person could have swerved in time. But the "reasonable person" legal standard for driver neg... View full abstract»

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  • Blockchains: How they work and why they'll change the world

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):26 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5423 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bitcoin was hatched as an act of defiance. Unleashed in the wake of the Great Recession, the cryptocurrency was touted by its early champions as an antidote to the inequities and corruption of the traditional financial system. They cherished the belief that as this parallel currency took off, it would compete with and ultimately dismantle the institutions that had brought about the crisis. Bitcoin... View full abstract»

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  • Self-driving cars and the law

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):46 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5302 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    It is the year 2023, and for the first time, a self-driving car navigating city streets strikes and kills a pedestrian. A lawsuit is sure to follow. But exactly what laws will apply? Nobody knows. Today, the law is scrambling to keep up with the technology, which is moving forward at a breakneck pace, thanks to efforts by Apple, Audi, BMW, Ford, General Motors, Google, Honda, Mercedes, Nissan, Nvi... View full abstract»

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  • SpaceX and blue origin face off

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):22 - 25
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1970 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The commercial space business has blossomed over the past decade. Two companies, though, have grabbed the spotlight, emerging as the most ambitious of them all: Blue Origin and SpaceX. View full abstract»

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  • Blockchain world - Do you need a blockchain? This chart will tell you if the technology can solve your problem

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):38 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (498 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    According to a study released this July by Juniper Research, more than half the world's largest companies are now researching blockchain technologies with the goal of integrating them into their products. Projects are already under way that will disrupt the management of health care records, property titles, supply chains, and even our online identities. But before we remount the entire digital ec... View full abstract»

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  • VR For Your Ears: Dynamic 3D audio is key to the immersive experience by mathias johansson · illustration by eddie guy

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):24 - 29
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1580 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Put on your virtual-reality headset and be transported to a distant planet, ducking the crossfire in a battle between alien species. Laser rifle shots whiz by your head; military shuttles hover before you; the frantic calls of comrades hail from all directions. ¶ Change the channel. ¶ Now you are courtside at a basketball game. You hear players trash- talking on the court in front of you and coach... View full abstract»

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  • Why software fails [software failure]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (245)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (9468 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Most IT experts agree that software failures occur far more often than they should despite the fact that, for the most part, they are predictable and avoidable. It is unfortunate that most organizations don't see preventing failure as an urgent matter, even though that view risks harming the organization and maybe even destroying it. Because software failure has tremendous implications for busines... View full abstract»

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  • Machine learning predicts home prices

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):42 - 43
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (758 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 1714, the British Parliament passed the Longitude Act, which offered serious money to anyone who could devise a practical method to measure longitude at sea. While the determination of longitude might seem a trivial thing in today's world of smartphones and GPS satellites, at the time it was an immense technical challenge. It took many years, but the strategy worked, leading to the development ... View full abstract»

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  • Hyperloop: No pressure

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):51 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5926 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 2013, Elon Musk had an idea. He would propel passengers in a pod through an evacuated tube at nearly the speed of sound, hurtling them from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 30 minutes. It's a lot quicker than the 2 hours and 40 minutes of the rival technology, a proposed high-speed train. View full abstract»

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  • Who killed the virtual case file? [case management software]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):24 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11484 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper discusses how the FBI's $170 million Virtual Case File (VCF) IT project became one of the most highly publicized software failure in history. According to a report by the US Department of Justice's inspector general, VCF's failure may be attributed to several factors including poorly defined and slowly evolving design requirements, overly ambitious schedules, and the lack of a plan to g... View full abstract»

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  • The Stethoscope Gets Smart: Engineers from Johns Hopkins are giving the humble stethoscope an AI upgrade

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):36 - 41
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3483 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    You wake up one morning to discover that your child is ill: His forehead feels hot to the touch, and his rapid breathing has a wheezing sound. You live in Malawi, where your health care options are few. When the local clinic opens, you wait for your turn with the solitary clinic worker. She's not a doctor, but she's been trained to identify and handle routine problems. View full abstract»

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  • Medical delivery drones take flight in east africa

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):34 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    While Amazon and United Parcel Service pour considerable resources into finding ways of using drones to deliver such things as shoes and dog treats, Zipline has been saving lives in Rwanda since October 2016 with drones that deliver blood. Zipline's autonomous fixedwing drones now form an integral part of Rwanda's medical-supply infrastructure, transporting blood products from a central distributi... View full abstract»

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  • Moore's law: past, present and future

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (385)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2810 KB)

    A simple observation, made over 30 years ago, on the growth in the number of devices per silicon die has become the central driving force of one of the most dynamic of the world's industries. Because of the accuracy with which Moore's Law has predicted past growth in IC complexity, it is viewed as a reliable method of calculating future trends as well, setting the pace of innovation, and defining ... View full abstract»

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  • A Tesla in every garage?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):34 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5679 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Last summer, as I drove around the San Francisco Peninsula, I caught glimpses of a sea change in American automobile culture. Plug-in electric vehicles and charging stations seemed to be everywhere. Near the entrance to Stanford University, I witnessed a three-car fender bender involving only electric cars. And perhaps most remarkable: the prevalence of the Tesla Motors Model S, a luxury electric ... View full abstract»

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  • The India of Things: Tata Communications' countrywide IoT network aims to improve traffic, manufacturing, and health care

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):42 - 47
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7713 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The 20 million residents of mumbai slog through monstrous traffic jams during monsoon season. The heavy rains that last from June until August frequently choke off the flow of traffic through India's most populous city, leaving millions of Mumbaikars seething in their cars after a workday. · Though it's particularly bad during monsoon season, Mumbai's traffic is awful even on sunny days. And meanw... View full abstract»

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  • VHDL-panacea or hype?

    Publication Year: 1993, Page(s):34 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (578 KB)

    The status of Std IEEE 1076, the standard for VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language; VHSIC stands for very-high-speed integrated circuit) and its likely future use and development are examined. The genesis of VHDL is recounted, and its use in the US and Europe is discussed. Problems with VHDL are considered.<<ETX>> View full abstract»

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  • SpaceX's space-Internet woes: Despite technical glitches, the company plans to launch the first of nearly 12,000 satellites in 2019

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):50 - 51
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1095 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    SpaceX has, of course, been ferrying quite a bit of stuff into space lately. [See "SpaceX and Blue Origin Face Off," in this issue.] But last February, SpaceX launched two small satellites of its own. They were for an initial test of gear intended for use in a globe-spanning broadband data network, called Starlink, made up of thousands of small satellites. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk nicknamed the two te... View full abstract»

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  • Ethereum will cut back its absurd energy use

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):29 - 32
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6703 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Bitcoin soaks up most of the hype and the opprobrium heaped on cryptocurrencies, leaving its younger and smaller sibling Ethereum in the shadows. But Ethereum is anything but small. Its market capitalization was roughly US $10 billion at press time, and it has an equally whopping energy footprint. View full abstract»

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  • The fight for the future of the disk drive

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):44 - 47
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2037 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    For most of the past 50 years, the areal density of hard disks-a measure of how many bits of data that engineers can squeeze into a given area-increased by an average of nearly 40 percent each year. Lately, though, that rate has slowed to around 10 percent. Everyone who works on magnetic storage is well aware of this problem, but only in the past year or so have executives from Seagate Technology ... View full abstract»

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  • "Iron man" suits are coming to factory floors

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):27 - 29
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1140 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    What's the most important thing for people to know about the full-body exoskeleton from Sarcos Robotics, which can turn an assembly-line worker into a superhero? "We're taking orders," says Sarcos CEO Ben Wolff. View full abstract»

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  • Driving tests for self-driving cars

    Publication Year: 2018, Page(s):40 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7782 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At a test track east of Gothenburg, Sweden, people are ushered into autonomous vehicles for a test drive. But there's a twist: The vehicles aren't actually autonomous-there's a hidden driver in the back-and the people are participating in an experiment to discover how they'll behave when the car is chauffeuring them around. At Zenuity-a joint venture between Volvo and Autoliv, a Swedish auto-safet... View full abstract»

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  • The White-Hat Hacking Machine: Meet Mayhem, winner of the DARPA contest to find and repair software vulnerabilities

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):30 - 35
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (14052 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Back in 2011, when the venture capitalist Marc Andreessen said that "software is eating the world," it was still a fresh idea. Now it's obvious that software permeates our lives. From complex electronics like medical devices and autonomous vehicles to simple objects like Internet-connected light- bulbs and thermometers, we're surrounded by software. View full abstract»

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  • Perovskite solar cells: Ready for prime time

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):37 - 40
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1991 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At a factory on the outskirts of Brandenburg en der Havel, Germany, bunny-suited technicians are manufacturing the future. The shiny, thin squares they're assembling into flat modules promise to outperform the best solar panels on the market. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Susan Hassler
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