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Circuits and Devices Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Mar 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Selecting an optical spectrum analyzer

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 51 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    One of the most common measurement instruments found in a modern optics laboratory is the optical spectrum analyzer (OSA). These instruments measure the optical power spectrum of light emitted from optical sources, as well as light generated from optical interactions with matter. OSAs are based on several technologies. Each technology offers strengths, but also has limitations. Choosing the correct technology for a measurement application requires understanding the concepts of sensitivity (the ability to measure low power optical signals), dynamic range (the ability to measure low power signals), resolution (the ability to measure two signals separated by a small wavelength difference), amplitude accuracy (the ability to measure the absolute optical power present), and wavelength accuracy (again, the absolute value) View full abstract»

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  • Simulating micro-electromechanical systems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 10 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB)  

    Modelling micro-electromechanical devices with a system of algebraic and nonlinear (partial) differential equations, as opposed to ordinary differential equations, simplifies the simulation process and eliminates simulator coupling problems. In this article, we automate the modeling of mechanical parts with electronic devices using MeXeL, which translates the system of equations to Spice3-netlists. In this way, difficulties caused by coupling different simulators are eliminated. Here, we show the suitability of such a method by dynamically simulating a deformable mirror device (DMD) and its controlling circuit View full abstract»

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  • Designing ASICs with UAHPL

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 14 - 24
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (972 KB)  

    Discussed the progress made in putting together a UAHPL based design automation system using software tools developed locally and in U.S. universities. The UAHPL language is used as the front-end specification medium because of its close relation to hardware implementation issues. The system is modular and technology independent so that future extensions and specific implementation issues can be added and modified. The work carried out so far has targeted semicustom design and standard cell methodologies. The front-end of the system, up to the netlist, is independent of technology and architecture. The output of this stage can be conveniently mapped to programmable devices (PLDs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) View full abstract»

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  • The virtual IC factory ... can it be achieved?

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 25 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (620 KB)  

    Technology computer-aided design (TCAD) is the software tool set that allows integrated circuit (IC) technologists to develop new processes and devices without having to build costly test lots. TCAD can potentially provide process engineers the same benefits that electronic circuit CAD (ECAD) has provided to circuit designers. Circuit designers can design, lay out, and test new circuits without fabricating them, and still largely be assured that the circuit will work when manufactured. Will the day come when an engineer can use software to develop a new manufacturing process and predict its performance and yield accurately? View full abstract»

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  • Fiber amps and lasers get down to earth

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 37 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB)  

    Practical optical fiber devices, particularly erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), are poised to tap the tremendous bandwidth of optical fibers in next-generation lightwave transmission systems, while enhancing network flexibility and reliability. Optical fiber amplifiers have come a long way since the first demonstration of a neodymium-doped type by Snitzer and Koester in 1964. It was not until the mid-1980s, however, that researchers began to revitalize and extend the field of rare-earth doped fiber devices by combining the technologies of low-loss silica optical fibers, rare-earth doped lasers, and semiconductor pump sources. Later this year, they will be practically applied in a big way View full abstract»

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  • Silicon technology-in the chips for the future?

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 32 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (444 KB)  

    Transistors made from silicon have dominated solid-state electronics for three decades, creating a multibillion dollar industry that has revolutionized modern life. At this stage in silicon's evolution, however, some observers doubt that silicon's dominance can continue. “Limits” to the march of silicon technology are sought, and the “breakthrough” that will supplant it is eagerly awaited, and, indeed, even regularly announced in the popular press. The author assesses exactly what one should believe about the future View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Circuits and Devices Magazine (1985-2006) covers the design, implementation, packaging, and manufacture of micro-electronic and photonic devices, circuits and systems

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2006.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dr. Ronald W. Waynant
r.waynant@ieee.org