Volume 54 Issue 6 • June 2017

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  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • A boat of glass and steel [Back Story]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 6
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  • Can we copy the brain? [Spectral Lines]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 8
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  • Google aims for quantum computing supremacy [News]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):9 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • New buzz on brain stimulation for depression [News]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):11 - 12
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  • The most complex 2D microchip yet [News]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):12 - 13
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  • The master plotter [Resources_Hands On]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):15 - 16
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  • Earning your drone wings [Resources_Geek Life]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 17
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  • Home 3D printer showdown [Resources_Tools]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):18 - 19
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  • Slow cycling [Numbers Don't Lie]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 20
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  • Agile words [Technically Speaking]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 21
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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - The dawn of the real thinking machine

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):22 - 25
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    The article states that neuroscience will give us what we have sought for decades. And that computers that think like we do. View full abstract»

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  • Special report: Can we copy the brain? - An engineer's guide to the brain

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):26 - 27
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    Summary form only given, as follows. In the human brain, higher-level information processing occurs in the neocortex, neural tissue that forms the outer layer of the cerebral cortex. In its intricate folds, brain cells work together to interpret sensory information and to form thoughts and plans. The neocortex is divided into regions that take the lead on different types of processing. However, mu... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - The brain as computer

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):28 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Painful exercises in basic arithmetic are a vivid part of our elementary school memories. A multiplication like 3,752 × 6,901 carried out with just pencil and paper for assistance may well take up to a minute. Of course, today, with a cellphone always at hand, we can quickly check that the result of our little exercise is 25,892,552. Indeed, the processors in modern cellphones can together carry o... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - What intelligent machines need to learn from the Neocortex

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):34 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Computers have transformed work and play, transportation and medicine, entertainment and sports. Yet for all their power, these machines still cannot perform simple tasks that a child can do, such as navigating an unknown room or using a pencil. The solution is finally coming within reach. It will emerge from the intersection of two major pursuits: the reverse engineering of the brain and the burg... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - From animal intelligence to artificial intelligence

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):40 - 45
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    Today's artificial intelligence systems can destroy human champions at sophisticated games like chess, Go, and Texas Hold 'em. In flight simulators, they can shoot down top fighter pilots. They're surpassing human doctors with more precise surgical stitching and more accurate cancer diagnoses. But there are some situations when a 3-year-old can easily defeat the fanciest AI in the world: when the ... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - A road map for the artificial brain

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):46 - 50
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    Brain - inspired computing is having a moment. Artificial neural network algorithms like deep learning, which are very loosely based on the way the human brain operates, now allow digital computers to perform such extraordinary feats as translating language, hunting for subtle patterns in huge amounts of data, and beating the best human players at Go. But even as engineers continue to push this mi... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - The neuromorphic chip's make-or-break moment

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):52 - 57
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    People in the tech world talk of a technology "crossing the chasm" by making the leap from early adopters to the mass market. A case study in chasm crossing is now unfolding in neuromorphic computing. The approach mimics the way neurons are connected and communicate in the human brain, and enthusiasts say neuromorphic chips can run on much less power than traditional CPUs. The problem, though, is ... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - Navigate like a rat

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):58 - 63
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    If you take a common brown rat and drop it into a lab maze or a subway tunnel, it will immediately begin to explore its surroundings, sniffing around the edges, brushing its whiskers against surfaces, peering around corners and obstacles. After a while, it will return to where it started, and from then on, it will treat the explored terrain as familiar. Roboticists have long dreamed of giving thei... View full abstract»

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  • Special report : Can we copy the brain? - Can we quantify machine consciousness?

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s):64 - 69
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7091 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Imagine that at some time in the not-too-distant future, you've bought a smartphone that comes bundled with a personal digital assistant (PDA) living in the cloud. You assign a sexy female voice to the PDA and give it access to all of your emails, social media accounts, calendar, photo album, contacts, and other bits and flotsam of your digital life. She-for that's how you quickly think of her-kno... View full abstract»

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  • A robot's delicate touch [Past Forward]

    Publication Year: 2017, Page(s): 76
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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine