Volume 53 Issue 3 • March 2016

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • Hitting the Slopes-Literally [Back Story]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 6
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  • Marvin Minsky and the pursuit of machine understanding - Making machines-and people-think [Spectral Lines]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 7
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  • "Barefoot" matriarchs take on India's electricity gap [News]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):11 - 14
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  • Software helps CRISPR live up to its hype [News]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):14 - 16
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  • Crunch time for the kilogram [News]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):16 - 17
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  • Feel the force [News]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 17
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  • Air plane - Electric skateboards [The Big Picture]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):18 - 19
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  • A ham radio for makers [Resources_Hands On]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):21 - 23
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  • CES and the future of VR [Resources_Geek Life]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 24
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  • Ronnie Nader [Resources_Careers]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):25 - 26
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  • What I see when I see a wind turbine [Numbers Don't Lie]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 27
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  • The end of the smartphone? [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 28
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  • Supercomputing's monster in the closet

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):30 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (8419 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    As a child, were you ever afraid that a monster lurking in your bedroom would leap out of the dark and get you? My job at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to worry about a similar monster, hiding in the steel cabinets of the supercomputers and threatening to crash the largest computing machines on the planet. The monster is something supercomputer specialists call resilience- or rather the lack of... View full abstract»

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  • From the cosmos to the core - They come from outer space

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):36 - 41
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    Some are born within the cozy confines of our solar system, surging forth when our sun flares up, as it routinely does, with geysers of plasma. Others have traveled from unfathomably distant reaches beyond our Milky Way galaxy, where stars at the end of their lives went supernova with mighty and sustained blasts. They are cosmic rays: streams of electrically charged subatomic particles that perpet... View full abstract»

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  • The 800-km battery lithium-ion batteries are played out. Next up: lithium-air

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):42 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6569 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Proposition: Electric cars will remain mostly niche products until they have a range of 800 kilometers, or roughly 500 miles, with an affordable battery. That's as far as most people would want to drive in a day, and then they have all night to recharge. That's how we came up with a figure of 800 km-or a nice round 500 miles-as the goal for our R&D project, Battery 500. It began in 2009 at... View full abstract»

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  • Silicon gets sporty

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4208 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The popularity of smart phones and wearables has been driving down the cost of MEMS devices, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometers, and pressure sensors. These minuscule chips help to count steps, track calories burned, and monitor heart rate. This article focuses on embedded MEMS based sensor for sports application. View full abstract»

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  • The NSA's frozen dream

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):54 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5927 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Today, silicon microchips underlie every aspect of digital computing. But their dominance was never a foregone conclusion. Throughout the 1950s, electrical engineers and other researchers explored many alternatives to making digital computers. One of them seized the imagination of the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA): a superconducting supercomputer. Such a machine would take advantage of super... View full abstract»

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  • It's brussels on line 239 [Past Forward]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 76
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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine