Volume 53 Issue 1 • January 2016

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 29
  • IEEE Spectrum [Front Cover]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • Giving wackiness its due [Back Story]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 6
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  • New year, new projects. same old ethics? [Spectral Lines]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 8
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  • Two steps closer to a quantum internet [News]

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):11 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Wireless power takes charge

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):13 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Three paths to exascale supercomputing

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):14 - 15
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  • Has Taiwan given up on supercomputing

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):16 - 17
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  • The Digital Apple

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):19 - 20
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  • DIY home security

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):20 - 21
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  • Burning man's tech mastermind

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 22
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  • Deaths of elephants

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 26
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  • Planning for greatness

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 28
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  • Top tech for 2016

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s): 29
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (109 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Prediction is hard, as the Danish proverb goes, especially about the future. So the editors of IEEE Spectrum have hedged our bets this year by including more topics than usual in our January special report on the coming year's top technology. We include subjects encompassing a geographic span from the bottom of the sea to outer space. The scope is similarly broad, ranging from consumer electronics... View full abstract»

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  • Cyborgs go for gold

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):30 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Michael McClellan flashes a thumbs-up sign as he speeds by on a recumbent tricycle, breathing hard but smiling behind dark sunglasses. He pedals along a paved path that loops through a leafy park in Cleveland, passing office workers enjoying alfresco lunches on a warm June day. They chew their sandwiches, oblivious to the guy on the trike. They have no idea that McClellan is paralyzed from the wai... View full abstract»

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  • Can HPE's "The Machine" deliver?

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):34 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (261 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    HP never shied away from big names for its computers. There are high-performance servers named Apollo and optimized computing systems called Moonshot. And then there's The Machine. When Hewlett-Packard Co.-now split in two- announced The Machine in Las Vegas in 2014, it presented the project as a near-complete overhaul of traditional computer architecture. Gone were the CPU-centric architecture, t... View full abstract»

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  • The U.S. may finally get a unified power grid

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):35 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (547 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    It is a decades-old dream: a single, vast North American electric grid, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Mexico to the Arctic Circle. Such a continent-wide supergrid would let officials transmit the tens of gigawatts of wind-generated power from the Great Plains to cities on both coasts. It would let Pacific Northwest hydropower flow to Chicago and let Texas wind power find its way to Massac... View full abstract»

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  • Studying Mars, inside and out

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):37 - 40
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    When the twin Viking landers touched down on Mars in 1976, each carried a seismometer. But the sensors turned up little in the way of planetary vibrations. One seismometer failed to deploy properly; the other, mounted like its counterpart on the lander's deck, picked up mostly wind. View full abstract»

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  • $100 million seti initiative starts listening for E.T.

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):41 - 42
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    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence-SETI-has a checkered history, and even its most ardent proponents accept that positive results are unlikely anytime soon. So it's no wonder that SETI researchers often struggle to find funding. But last year the Russian billionaire Yuri Milner offered to support SETI efforts over the next 10 years with US $100 million. The first radio observations, thro... View full abstract»

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  • Don't expect encrypted e-mail in 2016

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):42 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Last March Alex Stamos, then Yahoo's head of information security, showed off prototype software for encrypting sensitive e-mail messages. The new tool, which Stamos said could be ready for deployment by the start of 2016, featured "end-to-end" encryption, meaning that even Yahoo itself wouldn't be able to decrypt messages stored on its servers. View full abstract»

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  • Robot miners of the briny deep

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):44 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    For decades, futurists have predicted that commercial miners would one day tap the unimaginable mineral wealth of the world's ocean floor. Soon, that subsea gold rush could finally begin: The world's first deepsea mining robots are poised to rip into rich deposits of copper, gold, and silver 1,600 meters down at the bottom of the Bismarck Sea, near Papua New Guinea. The massive machines, which are... View full abstract»

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  • Northern lights out for analog radio

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):48 - 49
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (530 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Music recordings, video, television, and motion pictures-all have started or completed the transition from analog to digital. Oddly, though, broadcast radio remains largely analog around the world, despite the availability of digital services for more than a decade. But a major milestone for digital radio is coming next year, in Norway of all places. View full abstract»

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  • China's comac to challenge Boeing and Airbus

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):49 - 50
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    The C919, China's answer to the Airbus A320 and Boeing 737, is slated to have its first test flight later this year. Built by the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (Comac), the twin-engine airliner had its celebratory rollout last November in Shanghai. But even if this year's flight-testing goes well, don't expect to fly on a C919 right away. Indeed, if you live in Europe or the United Stat... View full abstract»

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  • Hyperloop: No pressure

    Publication Year: 2016, Page(s):51 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5926 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 2013, Elon Musk had an idea. He would propel passengers in a pod through an evacuated tube at nearly the speed of sound, hurtling them from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 30 minutes. It's a lot quicker than the 2 hours and 40 minutes of the rival technology, a proposed high-speed train. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine