Volume 52 Issue 6 • June 2015

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • Tech reporting in muck boots [Back story]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 6
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  • Homing in on health care's sweet spots [Spectral Lines]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 12
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Cheap earthquake warning systems [News]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):15 - 16
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  • Full-HD voice is nearly here [News]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):17 - 18
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  • Smart sewers for public health

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):18 - 19
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  • Giving supercomputers a second wind [News]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 20
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  • DIY diabetes remote monitoring [Resources]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):21 - 22
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  • A man and his mouse [Resources Review]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 23
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  • Baby by the numbers [Resources Tools]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 24
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  • Kira Radinsky [Resources Tools]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 25
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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  • Ever closer to the machine [Technically Speaking]

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 26
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  • It's too soon to call this the anthropocene

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 28
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  • Hacking the human OS

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s): 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1255 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    If you wear a fitness tracker, you're already generating scads of health-related data. It's the start of a grand experiment. In coming years, doctors will try to answer a vital question: Can they use your data to keep you stronger, healthier, and happier? View full abstract»

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  • Part 1 - Reading the code

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):32 - 33
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4826 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The body is a fantastically sophisticated machine. Most of the time, it runs just fine on its own. But, inevitably, things go wrong, and early detection of warning signs can be the key to preventing a total breakdown. We are on the verge of being able to monitor your physiological indicators day and night, at minimal cost, and with technologies so unobtrusive that you'll forget their presence. Fle... View full abstract»

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  • Giving your body a "check engine" light

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):34 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4363 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In this paper, John Rogers and his research team at the University of Illinois have developed a way of building circuits that act like skin, collect power wirelessly, and can be worn just about anywhere on the body. View full abstract»

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  • Diabetes has a new enemy: Robo-pancreas

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):40 - 44
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In this paper, Brian Herrick tracks the ups and downs of glucose in his bloodstream with a Dexcom system-a skin-hugging sensor that communicates via Bluetooth with a handheld monitor. View full abstract»

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  • The quantified olympian

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):44 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1550 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Biometric gadgets are transforming the way the world's elite athletes are trained. These wearable sensors provide on-the-go physiological measurements, which previously required bulky and costly lab equipment. Just as weight-training regimens became popular 40 years ago to build more resilient athletes, wearables are now helping players both improve performance and ward off injury. "I definitely s... View full abstract»

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  • The race to build a real-life tricorder

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):46 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (829 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Capitalizing on the impressive sensors and processing power in today's smartphones, startups are turning them into mobile diagnostic and monitoring instruments for both consumers and health care workers. As capable as some of these innovations already are, it's unclear whether they will pass muster with government regulators, which is why many of their makers are not yet touting them as bona fide ... View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing the code

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):50 - 51
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    As sensors and Internet-connected health gadgets proliferate, your biometric data will become more medically valuable and a lot more voluminous. But what will you do with all this information? Will you send it to your doctors? What will they do with it? ΞΎ Medical researchers are now building analytic tools that can turn raw data into actionable intelligence. Some are conducting vast surveys of vit... View full abstract»

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  • Tech giants bet on biometrics

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):52 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2683 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The consumer technology companies that own desktop software, Web search, and mobile phones have set themselves a new goal. They're aiming to carve themselves a slice of health care, the US $3 trillion industry that represents nearly a fifth of the U.S. economy. The heavyweight corporate muscle behind the vision comes from Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Samsung, which have all launched e-health init... View full abstract»

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  • 100,000 people, 250 biomarkers, and the quest for good health

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):56 - 57
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2700 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Researchers seek the keys to wellness in a project of staggering ambition. Intensely monitoring healthy individuals could make them less well, not more. Take today's screenings for prostate cancer, which often flag benign lesions and slow-growing tumors that will never become life threatening. Worried that patients were undergoing unnecessary surgeries, medical groups recently scaled back screenin... View full abstract»

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  • Their prescription: big data

    Publication Year: 2015, Page(s):58 - 85
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    John and Kathy Halamka met on their first day in their freshman dorm at Stanford. They decided almost instantly that they made the perfect team: With his science background and her artistic sensibility, they'd be able to handle anything that college, or life, could throw at them. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine