Volume 24 Issue 10 • Oct. 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 36
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c1
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  • [Front inside cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c2
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • News log

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 3
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):4 - 5
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):6 - 7
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):8 - 9
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  • Speakout: A time for cooperation

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):10 - 11
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    The United States and Japan should increase their cooperative efforts and share the cost of basic scientific research on technologies of high interest for their mutual benefit. Possible projects — identified by the U.S.-Japan Advisory Commission — are fifth-generation computers, machine translation between English and Japanese, high-energy physics, life sciences and cancer research, and developmen... View full abstract»

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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):12 - 15
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  • Faults & failures

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):16 - 19
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    In a city as notorious for snarled rush-hour traffic as Dallas, Texas, the Department of Transportation panics when traffic lights go on the blink. In July and August 1986 panic set in when about 10 percent of the lights in the central business district of Dallas began flashing red in all directions, just as the afternoon rush hour commenced. View full abstract»

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  • The engineer at large

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 20
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  • Innovations patents, processes, and products

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 21
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2209 KB)

    Monitoring electrical activity in the brain for medical diagnoses is time-consuming, expensive, and subjective. For a full-fledged electroencephalogram (EEG), 19 places on the patient's head must be cleaned and electrodes individually attached to the skull, a process requiring about 30–45 minutes. View full abstract»

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  • Program notes: Software topics

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):22 - 27
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  • Video programs and technology

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):28 - 30
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    Certain enhancements of video signals — expansion and compression, for example — can be done by analog processing, rather than digitally. In eliminating the need for a digital processor along with its I/O printed-circuit and special software, the processor design is simplified. A circuit that logarithmically expands or compresses video signals, the video enhancement module Model 2545 is available ... View full abstract»

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  • Spectral lines: A pervasive machine

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 31
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    In previous coverage of the automobile industry we labeled the auto “an insidious and cultural machine.” It is probably worth repeating. View full abstract»

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  • The global automobile

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):32 - 33
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    Ten years ago, when Spectrum published a special issue on the automobile, it was not obvious that the automotive industry was on the brink of a major transformation. Carmakers in the United States were concentrating on producing downsized cars that conformed to Government mandates for fuel economy and exhaust emissions. Japanese inroads on car sales in the United States were climbing, but were not... View full abstract»

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  • Survival strategy: Go global: International alliances, quality, and efficiency mark the winners in the high-stakes automobile-manufacturing game

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):34 - 38
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    Today's “Ford” car may have been assembled in either the United States or West Germany by the Ford Motor Co.; in South Korea by Kia Motor Corp.; in South Korea, Japan, or the United States by Mazda Motor Corp.; or in Taiwan by Lio Ho Motor Co. Ltd. The car may have an engine from Volkswagen AG of West Germany or Peugeot S.A. of France, as well as parts from other worldwide suppliers. Globalization... View full abstract»

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  • Compressing the design cycle: Cad and cae are crucial competitive tools, but honing them to maximum effectiveness is slow work karen fitzgerald associate editor

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):39 - 42
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    The introduction of computer aided design and engineering techniques to shorten the length of the design cycle for US automobiles from its present five years is discussed. Clay versus computer modeling, problems of electronic data interchange, and computerized design analysis are among the issues examined. View full abstract»

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  • Better cars for less: Automation is only one of several roads to auto plants with improved quality and production efficiency

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):43 - 46
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    Attempts by US automobile manufactures to improve quality and production efficiency are examined. The contribution of automation to this effort is assessed. Other measures that must accompany automation if it is to be fully effective are addressed. View full abstract»

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  • Out-sourcing rediscovered: Purchasing parts and even complete vehicles from independent suppliers can keep costs down and quality up

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):47 - 49
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    The British bands played “The world turned upside down” at the Yorktown surrender, and the lyrics of that song, if not the music, today strike a sympathetic chord in Detroit. The Big Three automakers' world has been turned upside down by global competition, and now they are fighting back. General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler have all adopted many of their competitors' practices. One of the key manuf... View full abstract»

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  • Banishing the necktie: As automakers discover as much useful knowledge on the factory floor as in the executive suite, respect and productivity follow

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):50 - 52
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    Vice presidents wearing coveralls, lack of preferred parking spaces, and open offices may seem only token gestures, but simple measures like these symbolize an upheaval in the way U.S. automakers now manage production-line workers. More practical measures that are beginning to be adopted widely in the United States include arranging workers in teams, permitting any worker to stop the production li... View full abstract»

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  • Cooperating to compete: Allied companies share expertise, distribute risk, acquire technology, and provide products for niche markets

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):53 - 56
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    In such diverse places as São Paulo in Brazil, Seoul in South Korea, and Fremont in California, auto manufacturers have made the same discovery: it often pays to cooperate with the competition. View full abstract»

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  • The experts speak out: The philosophy of competitive automaking has changed, say industry leaders; whatever methods are used, the details must be precisely right

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):57 - 60
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    Even some of the world's most successful automakers now accept ways to do business that were once heresy in Detroit, although acceptable in Tokyo. Executives described to Spectrum five basic lessons they have learned over a turbulent 10 years of intense competition: View full abstract»

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  • What went wrong? A fault, a failure, and a debate: Even the best manufacturers may find problems in unexpected places

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):61 - 63
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    The three examples described here indicate the variety of difficulties faced by automakers in an increasingly demanding consumer climate. They range from the alleged sudden, or unintended, acceleration problems of the Audi 5000S and other vehicles — a fault with no single generally accepted cause — to a better defined problem: the Cadillac V8–6–4 engine, a technologically sophisticated motor plagu... View full abstract»

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  • Whatever happened to: Alternative engines, automatic traffic control and continuously variable transmissions?

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):64 - 66
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    Did the effort and money spent on research into alternative engines, automatic traffic control, and continuously variable transmissions all go for nothing? By no means, but mainly because of changing external factors, not everything developed in the ways people expected. View full abstract»

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