Volume 22 Issue 8 • Aug. 1985

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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):4 - 7
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  • Speakout

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 8
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 9
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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):10 - 15
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  • The engineer at large

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 16
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  • Continuum

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 17
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  • Innovations

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):18 - 21
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  • Video

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):22 - 26
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  • Program notes [reports of new computer programs]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):27 - 28
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  • Spectral lines: Is the 4-year-baccalaureate obsolete?

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 29
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    A rising tide of skepticism about the viability of the four-year engineering curriculum is evident. View full abstract»

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  • Fiber optics: Poised to displace satellites: Expansion of fiber-optic cable networks will lead to the creation of new communication services and may limit the role of satellites

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):30 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    The advantages offered by fiber-optic systems are summarized., These include low susceptibility to electromagnetic interference, absence of electromagnetic radiation leaks, and absence of noticeable delay in signal propagation. Attention is then given to recent improvements in satellite communications, including delay `compensators' and forward error-correcting codes. Work being done to overcome t... View full abstract»

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  • Toward simpler, faster computers: By omitting unnecessary functions, designers of reduced-instruction-set computers increase system speed and hold down equipment costs

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):38 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6405 KB)

    It is pointed out that examinations, some of them made as far back as the 1960s, of which instruction computers actually execute and how much time they spend executing them appear to indicate that complex, specialized instructions are so infrequent that they cost more to implement than they are worth. A computer designed according to RISC (reduced-instruction-set computer) precepts-which its propo... View full abstract»

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  • Tactile sensors and the gripping challenge: Increasing the performance of sensors over a wide range of force is a first step toward robotry that can hold and manipulate objects as humans do

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):46 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (69)  |  Patents (24)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7321 KB)

    The three major types of tactile sensors currently available, namely optical sensors, conductive elastomer sensors, and silicon strain gauges, are discussed. Attention is also given to the new tactile sensing possibilities that are opening up as more data on the human skin become available. The principles of ultrasonic sensing are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • More than mainframes: Power utilities are finding that the mix-and-match trend that is evident in computer systems is for them a matter of survival

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):54 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
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    Attention is called to the mix-and-match trend that is taking hold in computer systems design. Rather than relying on one mainframe or minicomputer to do all their computing tasks, more and more industries are blending microcomputers, minicomputers, and mainframes to take advantage of the best features of each. The new demands that are being placed on the energy-management systems (EMSs) of utilit... View full abstract»

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  • Satellites and mobile phones: Planning a marriage: Dramatic improvements in rural communications may be in the offing as direct service by satellite to mobile phones moves closer to reality

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):62 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4004 KB)

    It is pointed out that cellular radio is not well suited for rural areas, where potential users are sparsely distributed. Mobile satellite service is seen as the ideal way to pick up where cellular leaves off, particularly if mobile units are developed that will work with either system. The new system could also provide nationwide two-way voice dispatch services. Interest in the new system is high... View full abstract»

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  • Awards/85: IEEE Field Award winners

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):68 - 69
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  • EEs' tools & toys

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):70 - 72
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  • Calendar

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):73 - 75
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  • Papers are invited

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):76 - 78
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  • New and recent IEEE publications

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):79 - 80
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  • IEEE tables of contents

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):81 - 86
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  • Scanning the Institute

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 87
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