By Topic

Systems, Man, and Cybernetics: Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 2013

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1 - 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (46 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (137 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Ontology Fusion in High-Level-Architecture-Based Collaborative Engineering Environments

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 2 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (985 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In high-level-architecture (HLA)-based distributed heterogeneous collaborative engineering environments (CEEs), the construction of federation object model files is time consuming. This paper presents an ontology fusion approach aiming at establishing a common understanding in such collaborative environments. The proposed approach has three steps: ontology mapping, ontology alignment, and ontology merging. Ontology mapping employs a top-down approach to explore all bridge relations between two terms from different ontologies based on bridge axioms and deduction rules. Ontology alignment adopts a bottom-up approach to discover implicit bridge relations between two terms from different domain ontologies based on equivalent inference. Ontology merging generates a new collaboration ontology from discovered equivalent bridge relations. It adopts an axiom-based ontology fusion strategy and takes heavy-weighted ontologies into consideration. It can find all the explicit and derived interontology relations. In a typical CEE, the proposed approach has a great potential to improve the efficiency of preparation for HLA-based collaborative engineering processes, reduce the work load for adaptive adjustment of existing platforms, and enhance the reusability and flexibility of CEEs. A case study has been conducted to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Energy-Based Mode Tracking of Hybrid Systems for FDI

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 14 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (892 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Hybrid systems operate in various states, which are represented by a set of modes. In each mode, the system is governed by continuous dynamics, and different modes correspond to different continuous models. For hybrid systems, model-based fault detection and isolation is a challenging task due to the fact that the system's prevailing dynamical model and its current mode (discrete state) are mutually dependent and intertwined. In this paper, a new energy-based approach is introduced for mode tracking of hybrid systems, and its associated systematic analysis is based on a hybrid bond graph. Each system's mode is characterized by a concise energy relation that allows mode identification in the new mode tracking method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On Nonexistence of a Maximally Permissive Liveness-Enforcing Pure Net Supervisor

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 29 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (278 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Behavioral permissiveness is one of the well-accepted criteria for evaluating the performance of a liveness-enforcing Petri net supervisor. However, a maximally permissive liveness-enforcing pure net supervisor does not always exist for any Petri net. This paper focuses on the nonexistence of maximally permissive liveness-enforcing pure net supervisors for a subclass of Petri nets. It shows that if a net contains a siphon that cannot be optimally controlled by a P-invariant, the net does not have a maximally permissive liveness-enforcing pure net supervisor. For a class of Petri nets that can model flexible manufacturing systems, sufficient conditions are proposed to decide whether there exists a siphon that cannot be optimally controlled. This paper also shows that a Petri net system does not have a maximally permissive liveness-enforcing pure net supervisor if it contains some special reachable markings. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Agent-Based Interaction Protocols and Topologies for Manufacturing Task Allocation

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 38 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2205 KB)  

    This paper focuses on interaction protocols and topologies of multiagent systems (MASs) for task allocation, particularly in manufacturing application. Resource agents in manufacturing are members of a network whose possible logical topologies and governing interaction protocol influence the scheduling and control in the MAS. Four models are presented in this paper, each having specific rules and characteristics for scheduling and task allocation. Two models out of the four use a well-known standard interaction method [contract-net protocol (CNP)], while the others are proposed in this paper. The newly proposed models are based on ring topology and algorithms developed in the research. A Java-based MAS was also developed to simulate different scenarios of task allocation and to compare the four models in terms of some scheduling performance indicators, using cases from manufacturing. The results produced meaningful differences between the four models, including their strengths and weaknesses. Two models, namely, modified ring and CNP-based peer-to-peer, gave superior performance compared with the others. Furthermore, the proposed modified ring exhibits significant potential in handling manufacturing task allocation applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis of the Respiratory Dynamics During Normal Breathing by Means of Pseudophase Plots and Pressure–Volume Loops

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 53 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (838 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports on the analysis of tidal breathing patterns measured during noninvasive forced oscillation lung function tests in six individual groups. The three adult groups were healthy, with prediagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and with prediagnosed kyphoscoliosis, respectively. The three children groups were healthy, with prediagnosed asthma, and with prediagnosed cystic fibrosis, respectively. The analysis is applied to the pressure-volume curves and the pseudophase-plane loop by means of the box-counting method, which gives a measure of the area within each loop. The objective was to verify if there exists a link between the area of the loops, power-law patterns, and alterations in the respiratory structure with disease. We obtained statistically significant variations between the data sets corresponding to the six groups of patients, showing also the existence of power-law patterns. Our findings support the idea that the respiratory system changes with disease in terms of airway geometry and tissue parameters, leading, in turn, to variations in the fractal dimension of the respiratory tree and its dynamics. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Algorithm for Reliability Evaluation of Nonrepairable Phased-Mission Systems Consisting of Gradually Deteriorating Multistate Elements

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 63 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Reliability analysis of phased-mission systems (PMS) must consider the statistical dependences of element states across different phases as well as changes in system configuration, success criteria, and component behavior. This paper proposes a recursive method for the exact reliability evaluation of PMS consisting of nonidentical independent nonrepairable multistate elements. The method is based on conditional probabilities and the branch-and-bound principle. It is invariant to changes in system structure, demand, and the elements' state transition rates among phases. The main advantage of this method is that it does not require the composition of decision diagrams and can be fully automated. Both analytical and numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application and advantages of the proposed method. The computational performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated through comprehensive experimentation on the CPU running time of the algorithm. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dynamic Interaction in Decision Support: Effects on Perceived Diagnosticity and Confidence in Unstructured Domains

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 74 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (891 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The evolution of eCommerce over the past decade has resulted in a wide range of tools that enable consumers to make better decisions about the products or services that they are purchasing. One class of tools that are now widely used in a variety of eCommerce domains are mashups, which combine disparate sources of information (e.g., price, product reviews, and seller reviews) to support buyer decision making. Previous academic studies that examined decision support tools for eCommerce domains have focused on the impacts on information search, consideration set size, and decision quality. This paper discusses dynamic interaction, namely, the degree to which a user can revisit and revise their inputs and consider alternative solutions during a decision. The relationships between dynamic interaction, diagnosticity, confidence, and intention were investigated in an experiment. The results of the study indicated that increasing dynamic interaction increased the perceived diagnosticity (i.e., the extent to which the user believes that the tool is useful to evaluate a product) of the decision support tool and the overall confidence in the decision. In addition, a post hoc analysis of decision quality suggests that increased levels of dynamic interaction also improve the overall quality of the decision made. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hybrid Liveness-Enforcing Policy for Generalized Petri Net Models of Flexible Manufacturing Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 85 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (678 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a hybrid liveness-enforcing method for a class of Petri nets, which can well model many flexible manufacturing systems. The proposed method combines elementary siphons with a characteristic structure-based method to prevent deadlocks and enforce liveness to the net class under consideration. The characteristic structure-based method is further advanced in this work. It unveils and takes a full advantage of an intrinsically live structure of generalized Petri nets, which hides behind the arc weights, to achieve the liveness enforcement without any external control agent such as monitors. This hybrid method can identify and remove redundant monitors from a liveness-enforcing supervisor designed according to existing policies, improve the permissiveness, reduce the structural complexity of a controlled system, and consequently save the control implementation cost. Several examples are used to illustrate this method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Resilient Control for Serial Manufacturing Networks With Advance Notice of Disruptions

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 98 - 114
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (513 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses optimal control policies to achieve resilience in a class of serial manufacturing networks. Resilience is the ability of a system or enterprise to minimize the effects of a disruption. Although resilient manufacturing enterprises have been investigated in many different areas, there has been little analytical investigation into real-time control policies for resiliency. Our goal is to study the real-time resilient control for manufacturing systems through mathematical analysis. To achieve this, we start with developing a model for a general manufacturing network. Then, the optimal control problem is developed for a simple type of serial network called a Decreasing Storage Cost and Decreasing Capacity (DSCDC) network given disruptions with advance warning. It is then shown that the results of the DSCDC network can be generalized to more general serial networks. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A New Method for Knowledge and Information Management Domain Ontology Graph Model

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 115 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (446 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new ontology learning model called domain ontology graph (DOG) is proposed in this paper. There are two key components in the DOG, i.e., the definition of the ontology graph and the ontology learning process. The former defines the ontology and knowledge conceptualization model from the domain-specific text documents; the latter offers the necessary method of semiautomatic domain ontology learning and generates the corresponding ontology graphs. Two kinds of ontological operations are also defined based on the proposed DOG, i.e., document ontology graph generation and ontology-graph-based text classification. The simulation studies focused upon Chinese text data are used to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of our proposed strategy. This is accomplished by generating DOGs to represent the domain knowledge and conducting the text classifications based on the generated ontology graph. The experimental results show that the new method can produce significantly better classification accuracy (e.g., with 92.3% in f-measure) compared with other methods (such as 86.8% in f-measure for the term-frequency-inverse-document-frequency approach). The high performance demonstrates that our presented ontological operations based on the ontology graph knowledge model are effectively developed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multiple-Rendezvous Multichannel MAC Protocol Design for Underwater Sensor Networks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 128 - 138
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (612 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Compared with traditional terrestrial radio transmissions in wireless sensor networks, the challenges of transmissions in underwater sensor networks (UWSNs) include lower transmission rate, longer delay time, and higher power consumption. In such a circumstance, the negative effects of transmission collisions deteriorate. Most of the existing UWSN medium access control (MAC) protocols handle the collision problem in a single-hop or light-loaded environment. They fail to function effectively in a multihop network consisting of more sensor nodes with heavier traffic loads. Using the concept of cyclic quorum systems, we propose a distributed multiple-rendezvous multichannel MAC protocol, MM-MAC, in this paper to reduce collision probability. The advantages of the proposed protocol are threefold: 1) Only one modem is needed for each node to solve the missing receiver problem which is often encountered in multichannel protocols; 2) multiple sensor node pairs can complete their channel negotiations on different channels simultaneously; and 3) data packets will not be collided by control packets and vice versa. Simulation results verify that our protocol can reduce collision probability significantly which enhances the network performance in a multihop UWSN. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On Specification Transparency: Toward A Formal Framework for Designer Comprehensibility of Discrete-Event Control Specifications in Finite Automata

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 139 - 148
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In control of discrete-event systems (DESs), specifying control requirements in automata is not a trivial task. For many DES applications, designers are often confronted with the long-standing problem of uncertainty in specification, namely, how do we know that a specification automaton does indeed model the intended control requirement? Toward a formal framework that helps mitigate this uncertainty for designer comprehensibility, in this paper, we introduce and develop a new specification concept of automaton transparency and investigate the problem of maximizing the transparency of specification automata for DESs. In a transparent specification automaton, events that are irrelevant to the specification but can occur in the system are “hidden” in self-loops. Different automata of the same specification on a DES can be associated with different sets of such irrelevant events, and any such automaton is said to be the most transparent if it has an irrelevant event set of maximal cardinality. The transparency maximization problem is theoretically formulated, and a provably correct solution algorithm is obtained. Given a specification automaton for a DES, the transparent specification automaton produced by the algorithm is a more comprehensible structure, essentially showing the precedence ordering among events from a minimal cardinality set that is relevant in modeling some requirement for the DES, and should aid designers in clarifying if the requirement prescribed is the one intended. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Robust Face Recognition for Uncontrolled Pose and Illumination Changes

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 149 - 163
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (953 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Face recognition has made significant advances in the last decade, but robust commercial applications are still lacking. Current authentication/identification applications are limited to controlled settings, e.g., limited pose and illumination changes, with the user usually aware of being screened and collaborating in the process. Among others, pose and illumination changes are limited. To address challenges from looser restrictions, this paper proposes a novel framework for real-world face recognition in uncontrolled settings named Face Analysis for Commercial Entities (FACE). Its robustness comes from normalization (“correction”) strategies to address pose and illumination variations. In addition, two separate image quality indices quantitatively assess pose and illumination changes for each biometric query, before submitting it to the classifier. Samples with poor quality are possibly discarded or undergo a manual classification or, when possible, trigger a new capture. After such filter, template similarity for matching purposes is measured using a localized version of the image correlation index. Finally, FACE adopts reliability indices, which estimate the “acceptability” of the final identification decision made by the classifier. Experimental results show that the accuracy of FACE (in terms of recognition rate) compares favorably, and in some cases by significant margins, against popular face recognition methods. In particular, FACE is compared against SVM, incremental SVM, principal component analysis, incremental LDA, ICA, and hierarchical multiscale local binary pattern. Testing exploits data from different data sets: CelebrityDB, Labeled Faces in the Wild, SCface, and FERET. The face images used present variations in pose, expression, illumination, image quality, and resolution. Our experiments show the benefits of using image quality and reliability indices to enhance overall accuracy, on one side, and to provide for indi- idualized processing of biometric probes for better decision-making purposes, on the other side. Both kinds of indices, owing to the way they are defined, can be easily integrated within different frameworks and off-the-shelf biometric applications for the following: 1) data fusion; 2) online identity management; and 3) interoperability. The results obtained by FACE witness a significant increase in accuracy when compared with the results produced by the other algorithms considered. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Self-Representation for Self-Configuration and Monitoring in Agent-Based Flexible Automation Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 164 - 175
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (912 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Automation systems become more and more complex, and their traditional hierarchical and centralized control may not be able to deal with this ever-increasing complexity satisfactorily. Decentralized approaches are considered promising, but they are not yet sufficiently understood for widespread industrial application. In particular, agent-based control has not yet achieved its potential, so that more research is still required. Our approach is based on the concept of an automation agent composed of a hardware (HW) component and a software (SW) component, where the HW component can be viewed as an embodiment of this SW component. These agents represent the parts of a flexible automation system. In particular, we propose that each such agent has an explicit symbolic representation of itself and of its relations to its environment. More precisely, this new agent architecture contains a reflective world model that includes a representation of this same agent and of its relations to its environment. In addition, the world model contains representations of situations and activities. We show that and how such a self-representation can be used for self-configuration, as well as monitoring, including failure detection in automation systems. The agent performs this self-configuration without any human intervention and just based on a brief specification of the HW configuration. The monitoring is based on automatically raised expectations for the system's behavior and allows failure detection without any specific failure detection code. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Crowdsourcing Predictors of Behavioral Outcomes

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 176 - 185
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Generating models from large data sets-and determining which subsets of data to mine-is becoming increasingly automated. However, choosing what data to collect in the first place requires human intuition or experience, usually supplied by a domain expert. This paper describes a new approach to machine science which demonstrates for the first time that nondomain experts can collectively formulate features and provide values for those features such that they are predictive of some behavioral outcome of interest. This was accomplished by building a Web platform in which human groups interact to both respond to questions likely to help predict a behavioral outcome and pose new questions to their peers. This results in a dynamically growing online survey, but the result of this cooperative behavior also leads to models that can predict the user's outcomes based on their responses to the user-generated survey questions. Here, we describe two Web-based experiments that instantiate this approach: The first site led to models that can predict users' monthly electric energy consumption, and the other led to models that can predict users' body mass index. As exponential increases in content are often observed in successful online collaborative communities, the proposed methodology may, in the future, lead to similar exponential rises in discovery and insight into the causal factors of behavioral outcomes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Knowledge Engineering for Bayesian Networks: How Common Are Noisy-MAX Distributions in Practice?

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 186 - 195
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One problem faced in knowledge engineering for Bayesian networks (BNs) is the exponential growth of the number of parameters in their conditional probability tables (CPTs). The most common practical solution is the application of the so-called canonical gates and, among them, the noisy-or (or their generalization, the noisy-MAX) gates, which take advantage of the independence of causal interactions and provide a logarithmic reduction of the number of parameters required to specify a CPT. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that fits a noisy-MAX distribution to an existing CPT, and we apply this algorithm to search for noisy-MAX gates in three existing practical BN models: Alarm, Hailfinder, and Hepar II. We show that the noisy-MAX gate provides a surprisingly good fit for as many as 50% of CPTs in two of these networks. We observed this in both distributions elicited from experts and those learned from data. The importance of this finding is that it provides an empirical justification for the use of the noisy-MAX gate as a powerful knowledge engineering tool. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Petri Net Modeling and Cycle-Time Analysis of Dual-Arm Cluster Tools With Wafer Revisiting

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 196 - 207
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (321 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There are wafer fabrication processes in cluster tools that require wafer revisiting. If a swap strategy is applied to dual-arm cluster tools handling wafer revisiting, a three-wafer periodical process is formed with three wafers completed in each period. Such a period contains three cycles in a revisiting process and three cycles in a nonrevisiting one. Hence, analysis and scheduling of such tools become very complicated. In this paper, a Petri net (PN) model is developed to describe their operations. Based on it, it is found that, if a swap strategy is applied, such tools are always in a transient state. A systematic method is then presented to analyze their performance. With the help of the proposed PN model, this work, for the first time, derives the optimality conditions of three-wafer period scheduling. Industrial application examples are given to show the results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Validating Agent Interactions in Construct Against Empirical Communication Networks Using the Calibrated Grounding Technique

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 208 - 214
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (494 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Validating a computational model is important as it establishes that the model has met its intended purpose of representing the system under study. In this paper, we perform a validation study on Construct, a multiagent network model for the coevolution of agents and the sociocultural environments that they inhabit. In particular, we focus on validating agent interactions produced by the model against empirical communication networks collected in real-world organizations. Validation is performed using our novel calibrated grounding technique. Results show that Construct can produce valid agent interactions. The benefits and implications of the study are discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Parsimonious Monitor Control of Petri Net Models of Flexible Manufacturing Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 215 - 221
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Most approaches for deadlock prevention and liveness enforcement in Petri nets rely on siphon control methods or the theory of regions to derive monitor-based supervisors. These techniques raise methodological and computational issues, from the existence of feasible solutions to the hardness of guaranteeing maximal permissivity and optimality in the size and cost of the control subnet. Recently, the supervisor design problem has also been reformulated as a direct monitor optimization task based on integer linear programming, which can more effectively deal with the mentioned issues and objectives. This paper introduces an efficient branch-and-bound scheme for the exploration of the solution space of the direct monitor optimization problem. An extensive computational analysis on a set of benchmark instances demonstrates the efficiency of the approach. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Toward the Data-Brain Driven Systematic Brain Data Analysis

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 222 - 228
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (417 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Aiming at the characteristics of human-thinking-centric studies, brain informatics (BI) emphasizes a systematic methodology, in which systematic brain data analysis is a key issue. In this paper, a multiagent system, namely, the global learning scheme for BI, is proposed to perform a data-brain driven process planning. Utilizing the obtained three types of mining workflows, a three-step analytical process can be carried out for multiaspect brain data analysis. The proposed work presents a practical approach toward the data-brain driven systematic brain data analysis. A scenario is provided to demonstrate the significance and usefulness of the proposed approach. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fuzzy Reliability-Based Traction Control Model for Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 229 - 234
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (302 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a fuzzy Bayesian traction control system was developed for rail vehicles with speed sensors in intelligent transportation systems. The system included three main components to sense, process, and classify the traction conditions. The information received from the speed sensors is used to avoid any error that might cause service interruption and unnecessary maintenance. There are, however, occasions when these signals may not be sensed, transmitted, or received precisely due to unexpected conditions such as noise. Therefore, in this study, the γ-level fuzzy Bayesian model was proposed for sensor-based traction control systems. In order to apply the fuzzy Bayesian concept, the wheel acceleration was assumed to be a fuzzy random variable for membership function with fuzzy prior distribution. Using the fuzzy signals, the intelligent model calculates the risk of classification for the system that results in determining the misclassification decision at a minimum cost. The model's engine involves a mathematical problem which can be solved in any programming language in onboard or embedded computers. The conceptual model was applied to a case study with promising results, which can be used for target systems or simulation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Open Access

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 235
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1155 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Xplore Digital Library

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 236
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1346 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The scope of the IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics: Systems includes the fields of systems engineering.

 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
C. L. Philip Chen
The University of Macau