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Nanotechnology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date July 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 35
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology publication information

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 649 - 650
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  • Ternary DyFeB Nanoparticles and Nanoflakes With High Coercivity and Magnetic Anisotropy

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 651 - 653
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (285 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ternary DyFeB nanoparticles and nanoflakes were prepared by surfactant-aid high-energy ball milling. As the particle size decreases, the coercivity decreases from 16.8 to 0.4 kOe, indicating substantial influence of the size on the coercivity of the particles. In addition, strong magnetic anisotropy was achieved in magnetically aligned DyFeB nanoflakes. View full abstract»

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  • Deposition of Zeolite Thin Layers Onto Silicon Wafers for Biomedical Use

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 654 - 656
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    The spin-coating of silicon wafers, (including integrated field-effect transistors) with nanoporous synthetic zeolite is herein described. The aim of this research is to investigate the feasibility of fabricating low noise ionoelectronic microsystems to acquire different biosignals, particularly the action potential generated by neurons. The proposed technique is fully compatible with standard integrated circuit technology. Results of scanning electron microscopy, microanalysis, and absorption process are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • CMOS-Compatible Generation of Self-Organized 3-D Ge Quantum Dot Array for Photonic and Thermoelectric Applications

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 657 - 660
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    We demonstrate a CMOS-compatible scheme, selective oxidation of SiGe pillars, for creating well-organized 3-D Ge quantum dot (QD) array by guiding QDs migration along the oxidation path and thus placing them on targeted locations where the ultimate oxidation occurs. Stacked QDs exhibit tunable luminescence over the visible and possess low thermal conductivity, showing promise for nanophotonic and energy conversion devices. View full abstract»

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  • Electrical Transport in Polymer-Covered Silicon Nanowires

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 661 - 665
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (472 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The influence of polymer layers wrapped around n-type Si nanowires (NW) on their electrical characteristics is investigated. The NWs are fabricated via metal induced excessive oxidation and dissolution of Si, and have a diameter of ~350 nm. Single wires are covered by various polymer layers. The polymers used are both insulating [poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), polystyrene, and polyethylene oxide (PEO)] and semiconducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrenesulfonate). Four-point probe measurements are used to measure the conductivity changes of single NWs. The NW resistivity increases with PE and PMMA coverage, but decreases with PEO coverage. The changes are attributed to carrier exchange between the polymer and NW. The measurements also confirm active electron trapping with PE coverage that is not observed with the other polymers. View full abstract»

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  • Efficient AFM-Based Nanoparticle Manipulation Via Sequential Parallel Pushing

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 666 - 675
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1026 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) have become a useful tool not only for imaging at the nanoscale resolution, but also a useful tool for manipulating nanoscale objects in nanoscale device prototyping and for studying molecular and cellular mechanisms in biology. This paper presents a method, called sequential parallel pushing (SPP), for efficient and automated nanoparticle manipulation. Instead of using tip scanning to fully locate the particle center, this method uses one scan line perpendicular to the pushing direction to determine the lateral coordinate of the particle center. The longitudinal position of the particle is inferred from the position where the tip loses contact with the particle through real-time analysis of vibration amplitude of the cantilever. The particle is then pushed from the determined lateral position along the current push direction toward the baseline of the target. This process is iterated until the particle reaches the target position. Experimental results show that the SPP algorithm, when compared with simple target-oriented pushing algorithms, not only reduces the number of scan lines but also decreases the number of pushing iterations. Consequently, the manipulation time has been decreased up to four times in some cases. The SPP method has been successfully applied to fabricate designed nanoscale patterns that are made of gold (10~15 nm diameter) particles and of 170 latex 50-nm diameter particles. View full abstract»

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  • Novel Biosensor Based on Electrospun Nanofiber and Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Detection of E. coli O157:H7

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 676 - 681
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    A lateral-flow immunobiosensor is developed based on electrospun nanofibers and conductive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria. The magnetic nanoparticles are bioconjugated with antibody specific to E. coli O157:H7 to act as immunomagnetic separator to extract and purify the target from the sample solution. The cellulose nitrate nanofibers are synthesized using electrospinning technique to form unwoven biocompatible membrane with optimized nanoporous structure and excellent capillary properties. The nanofibrous membrane is biochemically functionalized with E. coli antibody to act as biosensor capture pad. Due to high surface area and unique nanostructure, the conductive pathogen/nanoparticle complex in the purified solution is effectively captured on the nanofiber membrane by antibody-antigen binding. The unbound nanoparticles and impurities are absorbed in the following cellulose membrane by capillary action. When the flow equilibrium is achieved, the resistance signal of the electrospun membrane is measured by a portable sensing platform, which indicates the pathogen concentration in the sample solution. This novel biosensor was capable to detect E. coli O157:H7 bacteria as low as 67 CFU/mL in a total detection time of 8 min. The test results demonstrate linear sensing response range of 101-104 CFU/mL, which is higher than that using nitrocellulose porous membrane under the same analytical conditions. This sensitive and low-cost biosensor fabricated using electrospun technology is fast and reliable, which can be used for on-field biodefense and food and water safety applications. View full abstract»

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  • Simulation of Magnetization Reversal and Domain-Wall Trapping in Submicron Permalloy Wires With Different Wire Geometries

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 682 - 686
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nonvolatile data storage in today's computers is based on magnetic materials. Hard disk drives (HDD) feature ferromagnetic thin films for recording bits as regions with different magnetizations in the film. At present, the efforts of decreasing HDD size while increasing storage capacity, however, face fundamental limits, namely, the so-called superparamagnetic effect. Research into new generations of magnetic data-storage devices, amongst others, considers as its basic working principle current-induced magnetic domain-wall motion (CIDWM) in magnetic nanowires. In this paper, we present simulation studies of external magnetic field-induced magnetization reversal and domain-wall motion in nanowires of various sizes and shapes. Our results contribute to the basic design principles applied to magnetic structures used in CIDWM experiments. Parameters, such as wire thickness and wire-pad geometries are investigated, and important threshold magnetic field values are presented. In addition, we introduce a novel method of domain-wall trapping in a magnetic wire using the fringe fields of close-by magnets. View full abstract»

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  • Integrated Device–Fabric Explorations and Noise Mitigation in Nanoscale Fabrics

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 687 - 700
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1436 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An integrated device-fabric methodology for evaluating and validating nanoscale computing fabrics is presented. The methodology integrates physical layer assumptions for materials and device structures with accurate 3-D simulations of device electrostatics and operations and circuit-level noise and cascading validations. Electrical characteristics of six different crossed nanowire field-effect transistors (xnwFETs) are simulated and current and capacitance data are obtained. Behavioral models incorporating device data are generated and used in fabric level simulations to evaluate noise implications of devices and sequencing schemes. Device characteristics are found to have different implications for logic “1” and logic “0” noise with faster devices being more (less) resilient to logic “1” (logic “0”) noise. A new noise resilient dynamic sequencing scheme is presented which isolates logic “0” noise events and prevents them from propagating to cascaded circuit stages, thereby enabling faster devices. Performance implications and optimizations for fabrics incorporating the new noise resilient scheme are discussed. The scheme is also analyzed and validated against an external noise source (power supply drooping). These results show that noise resilient nanofabrics can be designed through a combination of device engineering and fabric-level optimizations of the sequencing scheme. Performance optimizations and implications of device and physical layer assumptions on manufacturing are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Piezoresistive SU-8 Cantilever With Fe(III)Porphyrin Coating for CO Sensing

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 701 - 706
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    Carbon monoxide detection is required for various healthcare, environmental, and engineering applications. In this paper, 5,10,15,20-tetra (4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-21H,23-Hporphyrin iron(III) chloride (Fe(III)porphyrin) coated on a piezoresistive SU-8 microcantilever has been used as a CO sensor. Rapid detection of CO down to 2 ppm has been observed with aforementioned sensors. Cantilevers without Fe(III)porphyrin have not responded to CO exposure. Fe(III)porphyrin-coated cantilever selectivity toward CO has been analyzed by measuring the sensor response to various gases such as N2, CO2, O2, ethanolamine, N2O, and moisture. The sensor has exhibited a fast response and recovery times and is fully recoverable after repeated exposures. View full abstract»

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  • Analytical Vernier Effects of a PANDA Ring Resonator for Microforce Sensing Application

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 707 - 712
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (587 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A nonsymmetric Vernier type of a modified add-drop filter known as a PANDA ring resonator is simulated and calculated to achieve wider free spectral range (FSR) in the order of magnitude of terahertz and micrometer with different ring radii. The expanded FSR is determined by the least common multiple of the FSRs of the individual ring resonators. The dependence of the transmission characteristics of the PANDA ring on the coupling coefficients of directional couplers is studied. The improvement in suppression of interstitial resonances by using high-order Vernier filters is investigated. In application, such a system can be employed as a sensing system for measuring the wavelength shift, where the low power consumption due to the low intensity source is the other advantage. The potential for microscale force sensing application, especially, for atom/molecule force sensors. The sensing unit structure can be in the few hundred micrometers to millimeters. The applied force can be in the form of distributed force within thin film material which is coated on the sensing unit. View full abstract»

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  • Global Shape Reconstruction of the Bended AFM Cantilever

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 713 - 719
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (753 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Principle of atomic force microscope (AFM) is on the basis of cantilever's deflection. However, up to now, there are still no effective methods to model the cantilever's deflection with high precision, which will usually result in a poor measurement accuracy of AFM and has greatly limited further applications of AFM in more different fields. Thus, a global shape from defocus method, which is only based on a single vision sensor, is introduced in this paper to reconstruct the bended shape of AFM cantilever. First, the model of the defocus imaging is given using the concepts of relative blurring and diffusion equation. Second, the relationship between the relative blurring and the interested depth information is built with basic imaging formulas. Subsequently, the depth measurement problem is transformed into an optimization issue and an algorithm is designed to compute the deflection of cantilever. Finally, extensive experiments are conducted and results are analyzed to show the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed method. View full abstract»

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  • FastTrack: Toward Nanoscale Fault Masking With High Performance

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 720 - 730
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (908 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    High defect rates are associated with novel nanodevice-based systems owing to unconventional and self-assembly-based manufacturing processes. Furthermore, in emerging nanosystems, fault mechanisms and distributions may be very different from CMOS due to unique physical layer aspects, and emerging circuits and logic styles. Development of analytical fault models for nanosystems is necessary to explore the design of novel fault tolerance schemes that could be more effective than conventional schemes. In this paper, we first develop a detailed analytical fault model for the nanoscale application specific integrated circuits (NASIC) computing fabric and show that the probability of 0-to-1 faults is much higher than of 1-to-0 faults. We then show that in fabrics with unequal fault probabilities, using biased voting schemes, as opposed to conventional majority voting, could provide better yield. However, due to the high defect rates, voting will need to be combined with more fine-grained structural redundancy for acceptable yield. This entails degradation in performance (operating frequency) due to an increase in circuit fan-in and fan-out. We, therefore, introduce a new class of redundancy schemes called FastTrack that combine nonuniform structural redundancy with uniquely biased nanoscale voters to achieve greater yield without a commensurate loss in performance. A variety of such techniques are employed on a wire streaming processor (WISP-0) implemented on the NASIC fabric. We show that FastTrack schemes can provide 23% higher effective yield than conventional redundancy schemes even at 10% defect rates along with 79% lesser performance degradation. View full abstract»

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  • Integrated System-Level Electronic Design Automation (EDA) for Designing Plasmonic Nanocircuits

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 731 - 738
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a system-level circuit simulation framework for nanoplasmonic devices, and presents an example of the simulation of a plasmonic nanocircuit. The electronic design automation environment provides an equivalent circuit model library for several plasmonic metal-insulator-metal-based devices. The accuracy of the equivalent models for the plasmonic nanocircuit library is verified by using full-wave simulations and analytical equations. These models are then used to design an ultracompact Mach-Zehnder plasmonic modulator. It is shown that the voltage required to achieve a π phase shift Vπ in the modulator can be predicted by the simulator with reasonable accuracy. The optimized design of the modulator is also presented that reduces the value of Vπ according to the required specification. View full abstract»

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  • Programmable Logic Implemented Using Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 739 - 745
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1174 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors describe a geometric layout of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) cells and an associated set of clock signals that can be used to implement a programmable array of logic (PAL). PALs are an important category of programmable logic that can be programmed (typically once) to perform a particular sum-of-products Boolean operation. The particular device described has six inputs, four product terms, and one output. The connections between the inputs and the product terms are fully reprogrammable, while the connections between the product terms and the output are hardwired. This device takes 22 clock cycles to load the connection data and then completes the calculation in 57 cycles. The connection data are preserved in memory, so additional calculations with the same set of connections can be performed in just 57 cycles each. View full abstract»

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  • Field Emission Properties and Reliability of ZnO Nanorod, Nanopagoda, and Nanotip Current Emitters

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 746 - 750
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (577 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fabrication, optical, and field emission properties of ZnO nanorod, nanopagoda, and nanotip emitters were studied. The ZnO nanotip emitters are prepared by using combination of solution method and oxygen plasma treatment. All the emitters exhibit a highly c-axis preferred orientation crystalline structure. The nanopagoda and nanotip emitters have turn-on fields of 1.43 and 1.07 V/μm, respectively, under 1 μA/cm2 and field enhancement factors of 3681 and 4735 at 25 °C, respectively. The nanotip emitters with tip angle of 20° and number density of 10 emitters/μm2 have very stable emission at 25 °C over 2 × 104 s and successive operation between the 25°C and 100 °C over 5000 s. Our finding provides an effective route for practical applications in flat panel display and light-emitting device in the future. View full abstract»

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  • High-Yield Fabrication of Graphene Chemiresistors With Dielectrophoresis

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 751 - 759
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (885 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, but effective approach to deposit graphene on silicon wafers with dielectrophoresis. With a comb-shaped electrode design, graphene sheets can be actively captured between electrodes. Dielectrophoresis proves effective in depositing a large-scale array of graphene on desired locations. The deposition of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) with the same approach is also studied to compare the two forms of carbon-based nanomaterials. The graphene deposition has a lower success rate (approximately 62%) than s-SWNTs (100%) to cover the comb fingers due to the 2-D sheet structure and larger dimensions of the material. The assembled graphene sheets can successfully bridge over the electrode gap to create functional, ready-to-use electronic devices. The dielectrophoretically deposited graphene is used as the semiconducting material in a liquid-gated field-effect transistor, and it demonstrates p-type characteristics with holes as the majority charge carriers. When used in two-terminal chemiresistors, the deposited graphene demonstrates high sensitivity toward pH values in liquid. The resistance of graphene is inversely proportional to the pH value of the solution in the range of 5-9 with the pH sensitivity of 17.5 Ω/decade. The high-precision, high-yield deposition provides a practical approach for the fabrication of future graphene electronic devices and sensors. View full abstract»

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  • Investigation of Defects and Errors in Nanomagnetic Logic Circuits

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 760 - 762
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (237 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nanomagnetic logic circuits have recently gained interest as a possible post CMOS ultralow-power computing platform. In these circuits, single-domain nanomagnets communicate and perform logical computations through nearest neighbor dipole interactions. The state variable is magnetization direction and computations can take place without passing an electric current. Both experiment and theory have shown, however, that errors in circuit operation can sometimes occur. In this paper, we investigate the reasons for this, develop a simple model to explain imperfections in 1-D chains of nanomagnets, and show that it agrees with experiment. Finally, we discuss possible improvements in nanomagnet design suggested by the model to improve error rates. View full abstract»

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  • One-Diode Model Equivalent Circuit Analysis for ZnO Nanorod-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Effects of Annealing and Active Area

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 763 - 768
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    Electrical characteristics of 1-D zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were experimentally measured and followed by theoretical analysis using simple one-diode model. Defect sites (mostly oxygen vacancies) in ZnO are typically responsible for lower DSSC performance, which are removed by annealing the ZnO nanorods at high temperatures up to 450 °C. The DSSC performances with respect to the different annealing temperatures (250 °C, 350 °C, and 450°C) were determined by measuring their I-V characteristics at 1-sun irradiation (AM 1.5G). The variations in series and shunt resistances of DSSC were estimated by fitting the experimental I-V characteristics with the ideal I-V curve obtained from the one-diode equivalent model of the DSSC. By increasing annealing temperature, reduction in the series resistance Rs of the DSSCs with a subsequent increase in the shunt resistance Rsh was obtained. Annealing temperature of 350 °C was found to be optimum at which maximum DSSC performances with 1-cm2 cell active area showing minimum Rs (0.02 kΩ) with high Rsh (1.08 kΩ) values were observed. Reduction in the active area of the DSSCs from 1 to 0.25 cm2 and further to 0.1 cm2 demonstrated improved device performance with ~56% and ~24% enhancement in the fill factor and open-circuit voltage Voc, respectively, due to the reduced sheet resistance and lower recombination rate resulting low series resistance and high shunt resistance, respectively. At the optimum annealing temperature, maximum DSSC efficiency of 4.60% was obtained for the 0.1-cm2 cell active area. View full abstract»

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  • Thermally Robust Ni Germanide Technology Using Cosputtering of Ni and Pt for High-Performance Nanoscale Ge MOSFETs

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 769 - 776
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1507 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Thermally robust Ni germanide (NiGe) using the cosputtering of Ni and Pt on Ge-on-Si substrate is proposed for high-performance nanoscale germanium metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (Ge MOSFETs). The rapid thermal process temperature window for the stable sheet resistance of the proposed Ni-Pt cosputtered structures was about 50-100°C wider than that of the pure Ni structure, with neither NiGe agglomeration nor local penetration of Ni atoms into the substrate. In addition, the surface and interfacial morphologies of the Ni-Pt cosputtered structure were much smoother and more continuous than those of a pure Ni structure. The improvement in the thermal stability was attributed to the change of the crystal structure due to the suppression of the diffusion of Ni atoms and the uniform distribution of Pt atoms. Therefore, this proposed Ni-Pt cosputtered structure could be promising for high-mobility Ge-on-Si MOSFET applications. View full abstract»

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  • Heat Transport in Graphene Interconnect Networks With Graphene Lateral Heat Spreaders

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 777 - 781
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We simulated heat propagation in the integrated graphene heat spreaders within the interconnect hierarchy. In the considered design, the graphene layers perform the dual functions of interconnects and heat spreaders. We investigated Joule heating effects within the chip with graphene interconnect networks and heat spreaders. Numerical solutions for direct current and heat propagation equations were found using the finite-element method. The simulation results showed that the use of graphene as interconnects as well as heat spreaders lowers the maximum temperature of the chip. The maximum temperature of the chip was studied as a function of the interconnect current and thickness of few-layer graphene. Our results are important for design of graphene-based thermal and electrical interconnect networks in the next generations of integrated circuits and 3-D electronics. View full abstract»

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  • Postgrowth In Situ Chlorine Passivation for Suppressing Surface-Dominant Transport in Silicon Nanowire Devices

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 782 - 787
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We demonstrate a postgrowth in situ chlorine passivation method for suppressing surface-dominant transport in Si nanowires (SiNWs). This scheme helps avoid misorientations and meandering while facilitating the passivation of surface states. The leakage current of bridged SiNWs exhibited close to five orders of magnitude reduction as a result of chlorine passivation. The micro-Raman spectroscopy clearly reveals the nature of the varieties of silicon-chlorine bonds of the passivated devices. The chlorine-passivated SiNW surfaces are found to be stable over a long period of time with high immunity to environmental degradation. The chlorine passivation implies an effective and reliable method that can be tailored for mass manufacturing of nanowire-based devices. View full abstract»

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  • Carbon Nanotube SRAM Design With Metallic CNT or Removed Metallic CNT Tolerant Approaches

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 788 - 798
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1639 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A study of an eight-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) cell and its implementation in carbon nanotube FET (CNTFET) technology are presented. Simulations of the CNTFET SRAM cell design, using a CNT SPICE model, have shown advantages over the CMOS cell in terms of static power, dynamic power, and noise margin. However, current CNT synthesis processes grow metallic CNTs alongside semiconductor CNTs. This in turn greatly degrades the performance and functionality of SRAM cells. In this paper, we present and compare two approaches to overcome the presence of metallic CNTs. The first approach tolerates metallic CNTs and uses a series of uncorrelated CNTs to form a transistor; this provides tolerance to metallic CNTs. The second approach uses an M × N array of uncorrelated CNTs to form a CNTFET and requires technologies capable of removing metallic CNTs. Both approaches have similar static noise margin. The second approach (removed metallic CNTs) consumes 1.45× more static power; on the other hand, its CNT count and write delay are reduced to 35.6% and 10.9% of the metallic tolerant approach, respectively. The realization of large memory modules in the presence of faulty SRAM cells can be achieved by having memory modules with as few as two spare columns. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology is devoted to the publication of manuscripts of archival value in the general area of nanotechnology, which is rapidly emerging as one of the fastest growing and most promising new technological developments for the next generation and beyond.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Fabrizio Lombardi
Dept. of ECE
Northeastern Univ.