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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c1
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  • This month's covers …

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of content

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - technically

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2
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  • From the Editor-In-Chief

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 3
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  • The collaboration management culture

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 4 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2436 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A critical part of all technology companies or leading market competitors is the program innovation and execution. The difference that allows a company to leverage its collective strengths effectively is efficient program execution with the capture and dissemination of technology and techniques throughout the company. Unfortunately, companies sometimes struggle, and occasionally are quite poor, at completing programs on schedule with enough innovation and uniqueness to cause their customers to desire to work with them in the future. Instead, major companies remain the companies of interest by default because they, at least, completed the project, and this sometimes offsets the risk of working with another team. Even so, every engineer knows the frustration of trying to complete his work on-time and under-budget without having access to requisite material or a means of collaborating that is simple, effective, and adaptive to the users. Instead, the typical knowledge management system is a morass of repositories and inconsistent archival techniques unique to the person or program developing them. Often times they are a hodge-podge, maintained as a dumping ground of information relevant to the program of interest. Workers on these programs spend more time trying to find information than they do in generating the product on contract. They struggle to coordinate their efforts, generating large data repositories with varying search capabilities, sending data packets back and forth, editing documents and returning the document to the “keeper of the document,” and other practices that can be more efficiently done given an appropriate collaboration system. View full abstract»

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  • Complex adaptive systems engineering (CASE)

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 16 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    We suggest a portfolio of distinct but related systems engineering activities that collectively may work well in very difficult environments. The CASE methodology acknowledges the human factor and encourages exerting influence rather than control. We advocate their consideration and application in limited domains, at first, to gain confidence in their viability. View full abstract»

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  • Current wideband MILSATCOM infrastructure and the future of bandwidth availability

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 23 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The military satellite communications (MILSATCOM) infrastructure is typically broken into three categories: wideband, protected, and narrowband. Wideband systems emphasize high capacity, protected systems prioritize anti-jam features and covertness, and narrowband systems emphasize support to the disadvantaged user by providing low data rate communications to small/mobile users. This focuses on the existing wideband MILSATCOM infrastructure (namely the Defense Satellite Communications System and Global Broadcast Service), because the architecture that exists is aging technology that lacks the ability to provide the required bandwidth to the warfighters without relying on commercial satellites. Bandwidth is limited and expensive to purchase, resulting in the DoD leasing transponders on commercial communications satellites - a solution that may not always be an option. This also illustrates various technologies and future programs currently being investigated by the Department of Defense (DoD) in order to augment and/or replace existing systems, and the resulting capability and benefits provided to the warfighter. These programs include the Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS) (previously known as Wideband Gapflller Satellite System), and the Advanced Wideband System (AWS)/Transformational Satellite Communications System (TSAT). Both WGS and AWSITSAT will significantly increase the bandwidth capacity of the wideband MILSATCOM architecture. These military initiatives take advantage of nascent technology such as IP router technology and laser cross-links to maximize performance. Finally, thia describes several techniques to augment these MILSATCOM programs and increase their capacity and effectiveness, including: use of a network-style approach (vice point-to-point), combining space and terrestrial systems, use of near-space communication platforms (e.g., high-altitude. UAVs or balloons), operating at higher frequencies, use of multiple satellites and re-use frequencies, and us- - e of IP accelerators. These techniques increase the bandwidth capacity and improve its effectiveness by providing diversity, better quality of service via multiple relays, improved link performance via network architecture, and increase the amount of effective bandwidth available by including airborne platforms as additional communications relays. View full abstract»

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  • Warren D. White award for excellence in radar engineering

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 29
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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 30
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  • Distinguished Lecturers & Tutorials

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 31
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS personnel

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 32
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  • Annual Index

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 33 - 49
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  • Meetings calendar

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com