By Topic

Women in Engineering Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date June 2009

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Front cover - IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (390 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (339 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Degrees of Success [Letter from the Editor]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1551 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Where the heart is [Women to Watch]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1107 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Features profiles of three women in engineering: Karen Christman, Paulette January and Catherine Klapperich. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Brains and barracudas [The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly: Engineering FACTS]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 8 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (214 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    (1) Two Degrees of Separation from Einstein - I'm always telling my students the benefits of being an IEEE Member and an IEEE volunteer. I tell them about the networking opportunities to meet the leaders in our field and perhaps to work and learn from the greatest minds in the world. We always think that these opportunities will present themselves at conferences and lectures. I learned first hand that this is not always true. (2) Women barracuda can muck up mentoring hopes - Barracuda: A fish with sharp teeth known to shred its prey. Ruthless. There are many myths and stereotypes of the working woman, and one of them is that women are the best mentors for other women. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. This can be devastating when a young professional seeks support from a woman and is shocked at the illogical, sometimes career damaging, response. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Xtreme Programming Competition 3.0

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2450 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Giving babies a better chance

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 14 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (507 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Each year, more than one-half million premature babies are born in the United States, meaning they come into the world after less than 37 full weeks in the womb. They are tiny and fragile and often have underdeveloped lungs and weak immune systems. They can have problems digesting food and gaining weight, and many develop necrosis or sepsis, a type of blood poisoning. When these babies are born in rural or remote towns, often hours away from the nearest neonatal intensive care unit, the situation is even more dire. The doctors who care for these babies are faced with extremely difficult and complex decisions about how to treat them, whether to transport them, and how best to monitor their condition and stave off infection. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The electrode to recovery

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Parkinson's disease starts when the nerve cells in the part of the brain called the "substantia nigra" begin to degenerate. These are the cells that produce dopamine, a neurotransmitter that coordinates movement and muscle control, and if there's not enough of it, tremors begin and stiffness of the body occurs. As the disease progresses, walking and talking become difficult. Often, depression sets in. There are drugs that can help, but before long, the effects begin to wear off, while the side effects worsen. The article looks at another option: implanting electrodes in the brain. Using electrical impulses, the electrodes stimulate specific areas of the brain so that they function properly despite the drop in dopamine production. These electrodes then form part of a brain-to-computer interface. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Seeing the forrest for the trees

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 18 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    If all went according to plan, Michel'le Forrest would be a pre-med student right now. She intended to become a doctor because that was the best way she could think of to help people, and helping people was what she wanted to do. This was still her plan in 2006 when, during her sophomore year of high school, she went to an IEEE conference in Paris with her sister, Keyana Tennant, the program manager at IEEE Women in Engineering (and associate editor of IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine). It was on this trip that a new idea took hold. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Changing the world, one robot at a time

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 20 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1230 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Whoever thought that one day there would be a robot to help children with physical disabilities? Corrina Lathan developed a robot that motivates children with physical disabilities. CosmoBot is teaching children with speech, language, and other developmental disabilities how to express themselves. Built to withstand active play, CosmoBot looks like a spunky sidekick from a science fiction movie, with fully mobile appendages, motorized wheels beneath its feet, and a mouth that moves. The robot captures attention by mimicking a child's movements and its voice and can guide the child through educational and therapeutic activities under the direction of a therapist. A user controls CosmoBot with wearable sensors, by voice or with a mission control station, depending on the therapy. The machine is also wired to accept updated software and inputs from the Internet. The robot has three modes a therapist can activate. In the Live Play mode, CosmoBot responds immediately to controls or input. For example, a physical therapist will ask a child to cause the robot to raise its left arm by having the child raise his or her own left arm. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Country girl makes good

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 23 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2482 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    IEEE Fellow Pau-Choo (Julia) Chung may have grown up in a rural area of Taiwan, without even enough money for a new pair of shoes and a slim chance for an education, but her soul was certainly filled with motivation, pride, and love---motivation to succeed, pride in her upbringing, and love for her family. Those qualities have led her to a successful career including her current position as the director of the Institute of Computer and Communication Engineering (ICCE) at National Cheng Kung University (NCKU). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Listen to dreams [Career Advisor: Experiences from the Real World]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 26 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (243 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    (1) Listen, Learn, and Laugh: How to succeed as a woman engineer. (2) Two Roads Diverged in a Wood: Pappas twins travel diverse engineering paths. (3) Dream Beyond Dreams: Look forward with confidence. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • S-PACing a punch [Pipelining: Attractive Programs for Women]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 30 - 31, 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1042 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the economy dipping to the worst lows in almost a century and unemployment on the rise, opportunities to find new jobs have been sparse. For college students just entering the workforce, the lack of real-world experience can make the prospect of job hunting exponentially scarier, to say the least. Luckily for engineering students, there is some hope in the form of Student Professional Awareness Conferences, or S-PACs. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Personal and professional enrichment [WIE from Around the World]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 32 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Profiles of eleven women in engineering: (1) Karen Gourgey - Touch of genius, (2) Suja Ramnath - Strategic direction, (3) Laura Bottomley - Bottom's up, (4) Nani Mohammed Yousif Butti - Making it work, (5) Susad Sultan Al-Shamsi - A unique position, (6) Liang Downey - Active engagement, (7) Dalia Hassan - Rare air, (8) May Alhaji - Passion, preserverence, patience, (9) Bashayer Al Awwad - Management material, (10) Piriyadharshini Karthikeyan - Creativity to the test, (11) Ghaniya Bin Dhaaer Al-Yafei - Oil's well. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine is the first magazine to focus on issues facing women who study or work in IEEE’s fields of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Karen Panetta
Tufts University