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Medical Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1959

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 25
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IRE Professional Group on Medical Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): nil1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Breaker page]

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): nil1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A Multichannel Analyzer for Heart Potentials

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 107 - 109
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  • Computers Applied to Ballistocardiography

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 109 - 112
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  • A New System for Electrocardiographic Recording, Analysis, and Diagnosis

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 112 - 116
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • A Study of the Advantages of Displaying the Heart's Electrical Activity As Linear Time-Scale Curves of Spatial Magnitude and Orientation

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 116 - 118
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  • The Computation of Muscle Activity from the Integrated Electromyogram

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 119 - 120
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
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    The integration of a signal of varying pulse amplitude and frequency is discussed. Several solutions are considered, and a method is described in which an accurate integration is obtained with a circuit of short time constant and virtually infinite decay time. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic Reading and Recording of Digital Data in the Analysis of Primate Behavior

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 121 - 125
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  • The human being as a link in an automatic control system-part I

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 125 - 133
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  • Adaptive Servomechanisms

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 134 - 140
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    A discussion is given on some of the current ideas behind the control engineer's approach to the problem of developing servomechanisms which exhibit some degree of adaptive behavior. Several categories of adaptive systems are discussed and an attempt is made to associate the operating principle of the systems in each category with the behavior of the human being when he acts as a controlling device. A particular system developed for application in the field of automatic flight control is discussed from a functional point of view. The controller, using an analog model which operates on the input information, determines a ``standard of performance'' for the controlled element which closely approximates the performance desired by an experienced operator. The remainder of the controller, using a very simple passive network as a switching function computer to determine the state of a bistable device, forces the controlled element to operate in such a manner as to minimize continuously the error between the desired performance and the actual performance. The controller exhibits adaptive behavior in the sense that it operates in such a manner as to keep the actual performance of the system practically invariant, although the parameters of the controlled element change over a relatively wide range of values. View full abstract»

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  • Transmission of Ultrasound Through Living Human Thorax

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 141 - 146
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    Experiments are described demonstrating the passage of one-mc/sec continuous wave ultrasound through the heart and lungs at power levels of 100 mw/cm2 at the transducer terminals (a total of 1.25 watts). When the sound was directed through the region of the heart, the ultrasound was modulated by the moving intra-thoracic structures in synchronism with the heart beat. The records obtained were modified both by exercise and by amyl nitrite administered to the subject, but remained synchronous with the heart rate. Modulation of the ultrasound did not occur in two warm corpses. Sonic energy at the levels used to traverse the thorax did not affect a simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram. No deleterious effects have been observed on a subject whose heart was irradiated at 1 watt/cm2 and 3 watts/cm2 (totals of 12.5 and 37.5 watts, respectively) applied to transducer terminals at intervals over a period of one year (Appendix I). When continuous wave ultrasound was directed through a lung field clear of the heart, it was found that the attenuation varied 50 db between full inspiration and a lung emptying of 3400 cubic cm (0 db = full inspiration). In addition to direct transmission, sound is scattered throughout the thorax. The mechanics of the ultrasonic phenomena are described. View full abstract»

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  • Problems in Electroencephalograph Analysis

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 147 - 148
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • The Analysis of Electroencephalograms by the Use of a Cross-Spectrum Analyzer

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 149 - 156
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  • An Automatic Digital Recorder for Timing Sequential Events

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 157 - 159
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  • A Method of Measuring the Dynamic Characteristics of Muscle Rigidity, Strength, and Tremor in the Upper Extremity

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 159 - 164
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    A new method of quantitating muscle rigidity in terms of energy consumption per cycle of passive motion has been presented. The chief advantage of this method is its relative freedom from exact positioning of the patient with respect to the testing machine and its greater sensitivity as compared to torque measurements. Additional uses for the instrument include the measurement of tremor and strength. View full abstract»

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  • Computational Aspects of Brain Function

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 164 - 167
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  • Digital Recording of Electrocardiographic Data for Analysis by a Digital Computer

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 167 - 171
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    A corrected orthogonal 3-lead system has been used to record electrocardiograms directly from patients at Veterans Hospitals, using three FM channels of magnetic tape. A pilot facility has been designed and assembled by NBS to permit a medical technician to inspect these on an oscilloscope and select a significant cardiac cycle. This is automatically sampled at millisecond intervals and the numerical values are stored in digital form on magnetic tape acceptable to an electronic computer. Upon writing various programs for the digital computer, the cardiac researcher will have a flexible tool for objective analysis of large quantities of biological data by a variety of possible criteria. View full abstract»

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  • Possible Approaches to Multiple-Channel Tape Recording for Biomedical Purposes

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 171 - 174
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  • A Statistical Study of the Effects of Electric Fields on the Movements of Mammalian Sperm Cells

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 174 - 179
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A micro technique has been developed to facilitate the study of electric field effects on the swimming pattern of sperm cells. The instrumentation for this technique, a micro-electrophoresis vessel, a metering motion picture projector, and a simple analog computer for data handling, are briefly described. It is shown experimentally that 1) an electric field imposed on a cell suspension acts primarily to direct the cells to the anode without appreciably changing their swimming speed, and 2) the field effects are not linear functions of field strength. It is postulated that the field effect is primarily galvanotaxis and that the cells seek a position of minimum stimulation and therefore must have a transverse sensitivity axis. View full abstract»

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  • Autocorrelation and Crosscorrelation Analysis in Electroencephalography

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 179 - 183
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    Autocorrelation and crosscorrelation analysis, which have been used extensively in statistical communication theory in the past few years, can be applied, with certain limitations, to the study of the EEG (electroencephalograph). Autocorrelograms for normal subjects can be classified in several categories, according to the dominant frequency, or frequencies, present, and other parameters. Crosscorrelograms of EEG recordings from different locations on the head permit a comparison of the electrical activity at the two locations. Correlation functions and power-density spectra contain equivalent information because the one may be obtained from the other by Fourier transformation; but, because of the squaring and multiplication that appear in the computation process, the data so obtained are not exact equivalents of the frquency spectra derived from tuned resonators. A special case of crosscorrelation analysis (crosscorrelation of a repetitive signal with a synchronously occurring brief pulse) can be applied to the detection of electric responses evoked by sensory stimulation. This process is equivalent to averaging a large number of individual responses. Illustrative examples, obtained from semi-automatic computers especially designed for the purpose, are given. View full abstract»

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  • An Automatic Pressure Regulator for Extracorporeal Circulation

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 184 - 186
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    An automatic pressure regulator for controlling venous pressure during extracorporeal heart operations is described. The controller is used in procedures where a pressure is maintained in the venae cavae; i.e., where gravity flow is not used to drain the venous blood. A differential pressure transducer produces an error signal which controls the field current in a dc shunt motor and, consequently, the rate of pumping. The sensitivity of the controller can be varied in eight steps; on the most sensitive range, an error of less than 0.20 mm Hg can be detected and corrected. The total change in motor speed and hence pumping rate is ± 20 per cent. View full abstract»

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  • The Ultraviolet Flying-Spot Television Microscope

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 186 - 189
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • PGME Affiliates

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 190
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): c2
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The current retitled publication is Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Full Aims & Scope