Scheduled System Maintenance:
Some services will be unavailable Sunday, March 29th through Monday, March 30th. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

Volume 1: 2008

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (30 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering information for authors

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (31 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2008 Index IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering Vol. 1

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 198 - 200
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (41 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Impact of Neurotechnology on Rehabilitation

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 157 - 197
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5787 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper present results of a multi-disciplinary project that is developing a microchip-based neural prosthesis for the hippocampus, a region of the brain responsible for the formation of long-term memories. Damage to the hippocampus is frequently associated with epilepsy, stroke, and dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and is considered to underlie the memory deficits related to these neurological conditions. The essential goals of the multi-laboratory effort include: (1) experimental study of neuron and neural network function-how does the hippocampus encode information? (2) formulation of biologically realistic models of neural system dynamics-can that encoding process be described mathematically to realize a predictive model of how the hippocampus responds to any event? (3) microchip implementation of neural system models-can the mathematical model be realized as a set of electronic circuits to achieve parallel processing, rapid computational speed, and miniaturization? and (4) creation of hybrid neuron-silicon interfaces-can structural and functional connections between electronic devices and neural tissue be achieved for long-term, bi-directional communication with the brain? By integrating solutions to these component problems, we are realizing a microchip-based model of hippocampal nonlinear dynamics that can perform the same function as part of the hippocampus. Through bi-directional communication with other neural tissue that normally provides the inputs and outputs to/from a damaged hippocampal area, the biomimetic model could serve as a neural prosthesis. A proof-of-concept will be presented in which the CA3 region of the hippocampal slice is surgically removed and is replaced by a microchip model of CA3 nonlinear dynamics-the "hybrid" hippocampal circuit displays normal physiological properties. How the work in brain slices is being extended to behaving animals also will be described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Impact of EEG/MEG Signal Processing and Modeling in the Diagnostic and Management of Epilepsy

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 143 - 156
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (658 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This overview covers recent advances in the field of EEG/MEG signal processing and modeling in epilepsy regarding both interictal and ictal phenomena. In the first part, the main methods used in the analysis of interictal EEG/MEG epileptiform spikes are presented and discussed. Source and volume conductor models are passed in review, namely the equivalent dipole source concept, the requirements for adequate time and spatial sampling, the question of how to validate source solutions, particularly by comparing solutions obtained using scalp and intracranial EEG signals, EEG & MEG data, or EEG simultaneously recorded with fMRI (BOLD signals). In the second part, methods used for the characterization of seizures are considered, namely dipolar modeling of spikes at seizure onset, decomposition of seizure EEG signals into sets of orthogonal spatio-temporal components, and also methods (linear and nonlinear) of estimating seizure propagation. In the third part, the crucial issue of how the transition between interictal and seizure activity takes place is examined. In particular the vicissitudes of the efforts along the road to seizure prediction are shortly reviewed. It is argued that this question can be reduced to the problem of estimating the excitability state of neuronal populations in the course of time as a seizure approaches. The value of active probing methods in contrast with passive analytical methods is emphasized. In the fourth part modeling aspects are considered in the light of two special kinds of epilepsies, absences characterized by spike-and-wave discharges and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. These two types correspond to different scenarios regarding the transition to epileptic seizures, namely the former is a case of a jump transition and the latter is a typical case of gradual transition. In conclusion, the necessity of developing comprehensive computational models of epileptic seizures is emphasized. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cochlear Implants: System Design, Integration, and Evaluation

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 115 - 142
    Cited by:  Papers (33)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3336 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the most successful neural prosthesis, cochlear implants have provided partial hearing to more than 120000 persons worldwide; half of which being pediatric users who are able to develop nearly normal language. Biomedical engineers have played a central role in the design, integration and evaluation of the cochlear implant system, but the overall success is a result of collaborative work with physiologists, psychologists, physicians, educators, and entrepreneurs. This review presents broad yet in-depth academic and industrial perspectives on the underlying research and ongoing development of cochlear implants. The introduction accounts for major events and advances in cochlear implants, including dynamic interplays among engineers, scientists, physicians, and policy makers. The review takes a system approach to address critical issues in cochlear implant research and development. First, the cochlear implant system design and specifications are laid out. Second, the design goals, principles, and methods of the subsystem components are identified from the external speech processor and radio frequency transmission link to the internal receiver, stimulator and electrode arrays. Third, system integration and functional evaluation are presented with respect to safety, reliability, and challenges facing the present and future cochlear implant designers and users. Finally, issues beyond cochlear implants are discussed to address treatment options for the entire spectrum of hearing impairment as well as to use the cochlear implant as a model to design and evaluate other similar neural prostheses such as vestibular and retinal implants. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling Atrial Arrhythmias: Impact on Clinical Diagnosis and Therapies

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 94 - 114
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1269 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most frequent sustained rhythm disorders in humans and often lead to severe complications such as heart failure and stroke. Despite the important insights provided by animal models into the mechanisms of atrial arrhythmias, direct translation of experimental findings to new therapies in patients has not been straightforward. With the advances in computer technology, large-scale electroanatomical computer models of the atria that integrate information from the molecular to organ scale have reached a level of sophistication that they can be used to interpret the outcome of experimental and clinical studies and aid in the rational design of therapies. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of computer models of the electrical dynamics of the atria and discusses the evolving role of simulation in assisting the clinical diagnosis and treatment of atrial arrhythmias. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Screening the Cellular Microenvironment: A Role for Microfluidics

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 75 - 93
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3213 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The cellular microenvironment is an increasingly discussed topic in cell biology as it has been implicated in the progression of cancer and the maintenance of stem cells. The microenvironment of a cell is an organized combination of extracellular matrix (ECM), cells, and interstitial fluid that influence cellular phenotype through physical, mechanical, and biochemical mechanisms. Screening can be used to map combinations of cells and microenvironments to phenotypic outcomes in a way that can help develop more predictive in vitro models and to better understand phenotypic mechanisms from a systems biology perspective. This paper examines microenvironmental screening in terms of outcomes and benefits, key elements of the screening process, challenges for implementation, and a possible role for microfluidics as the screening platform. To assess microfluidics for use in microenvironmental screening, examples and categories of micro-scale and microfluidic technology are highlighted. Microfluidic technology shows promise for simultaneous control of multiple parameters of the microenvironment and can provide a base for scaling advanced cell-based experiments into automated high-throughput formats. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Wearable Medical Systems for p-Health

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 62 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (26)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (899 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Driven by the growing aging population, prevalence of chronic diseases, and continuously rising healthcare costs, the healthcare system is undergoing a fundamental transformation, from the conventional hospital-centered system to an individual-centered system. Current and emerging developments in wearable medical systems will have a radical impact on this paradigm shift. Advances in wearable medical systems will enable the accessibility and affordability of healthcare, so that physiological conditions can be monitored not only at sporadic snapshots but also continuously for extended periods of time, making early disease detection and timely response to health threats possible. This paper reviews recent developments in the area of wearable medical systems for p-Health. Enabling technologies for continuous and noninvasive measurements of vital signs and biochemical variables, advances in intelligent biomedical clothing and body area networks, approaches for motion artifact reduction, strategies for wearable energy harvesting, and the establishment of standard protocols for the evaluation of wearable medical devices are presented in this paper with examples of clinical applications of these technologies. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • BSS and ICA in Neuroinformatics: From Current Practices to Open Challenges

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 50 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1298 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We give a general overview of the use and possible misuse of blind source separation (BSS) and independent component analysis (ICA) in the context of neuroinformatics data processing. A clear emphasis is given to the analysis of electrophysiological recordings, as well as to functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI). Two illustrative examples include the identification and removal of artefacts in both kinds of data, and the analysis of a simple fMRI. A second part of the paper addresses a set of currently open challenges in signal processing. These include the identification and analysis of independent subspaces, the study of networks of functional brain activity, and the analysis of single-trial event-related data. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Machine Learning Methods for Protein Structure Prediction

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 41 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (723 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Machine learning methods are widely used in bioinformatics and computational and systems biology. Here, we review the development of machine learning methods for protein structure prediction, one of the most fundamental problems in structural biology and bioinformatics. Protein structure prediction is such a complex problem that it is often decomposed and attacked at four different levels: 1-D prediction of structural features along the primary sequence of amino acids; 2-D prediction of spatial relationships between amino acids; 3-D prediction of the tertiary structure of a protein; and 4-D prediction of the quaternary structure of a multiprotein complex. A diverse set of both supervised and unsupervised machine learning methods has been applied over the years to tackle these problems and has significantly contributed to advancing the state-of-the-art of protein structure prediction. In this paper, we review the development and application of hidden Markov models, neural networks, support vector machines, Bayesian methods, and clustering methods in 1-D, 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D protein structure predictions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multimodal Functional Neuroimaging: Integrating Functional MRI and EEG/MEG

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 23 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1058 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles, we proceed with a review of the major advances in the understanding and modeling of neurovascular coupling and in the methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG simultaneous recording. Finally, we summarize important remaining issues and perspectives concerning multimodal functional neuroimaging, including brain connectivity imaging. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the Spotlight: Tissue and Molecular Engineering

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 21 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (234 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article reviews the current technical advances and challenges in the fields of tissue engineering, molecular engineering, and regenerative medicine. Research in engineering 3D in vitro tissue models that capture in vivo tissue properties and cellular response to these in vitro tissue constructs are discussed in particular. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the spotlight: Neuroengineering

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 18 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (273 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article reviews current researches in the field of neuroengineering. Special focus is given to neural prosthesis, neuroprosthetic control and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for anthropomorphic and sensory prosthetic control. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the Spotlight: Health Information Systems

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 15 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (266 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article reviews the integration of health data in health information systems. The importance of electronic health records (EHRs) and their integration as well as current developments in this field are presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the Spotlight: Cardiovascular Engineering

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 12 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (223 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article reviews the development of patient-specific image-based models of the heart and the circulatory system. The goal of these types of models is to provide better assessment of cardiovascular function under the patient-specific pathophysiological conditions and to serve as a testbed for improved cardiovascular therapies that are tailored to the patient. These new models constitute a part of the growing trend towards the development of new computational approaches (i.e., computational medicine) that can aid treatment and prevention of human disease. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the Spotlight: Biomedical Signal Processing

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 8 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article presents a review on biomedical signal processing. Discussions on traditional approaches, nonstationary and nonlinear systems, signal fusion, physiological modeling, and the MMM (multivariate, multiorgan and multiscale) paradigm are included. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the Spotlight: Biomedical Imaging

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (278 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article reviews some of the more recent advances and trends in the area of biomedical imaging. Real-time multimodality imaging and image-guided interventions are presented as well as other fast growing areas of interdisciplinary research and development. Segmentation, registration and spatial-temporal integration in medical image processing are also discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In the Spotlight: BioInstrumentation

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 2 - 3
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This review briefly introduces three topics from recent publications in this field. These are: 1) new concepts of measurement methods; 2) noteworthy improvements of existing methods; and 3) feasible applications of bioinstrumentation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Welcome to Our Inaugural Year

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (273 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Reviews on Biomedical Engineering [publication information]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (36 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering reviews the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jose C. Principe
Department of Biomedical Engineering
University of Florida