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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 10  Part 2 • Date Oct. 2008

 This issue contains several parts.Go to:  Part 1 

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Front cover - NASA at 50: Some electronic connections [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Salute to NASA! [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Inside Cover [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • First rocket launch from Cape Canaveral: Bumper 2; 1950 [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents [Part Two NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Solar system picture [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Introduction [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 5 - 6
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Space program overview [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 7 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4314 KB)  

    A little over 50 years ago, on October 4, 1957, the world was shocked that the USSR had launched the first Earth-orbiting satellite. The International Geophysical Year (1957-1958) was established by an international scientific committee as a program for exploration and discovery for the Earth and near space. View full abstract»

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  • Post WWII technology [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 15 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1278 KB)  

    The US space program is a prime example of how a national imperative can reap benefits far beyond its initial goals. The attraction of space had been unfolding for nearly a century in novels; and early experiments with balloons and aircraft stimulated interest across the globe. Advances in rocket propulsion and structures were absolutely vital to accessing outer space; it is unlikely that the spac... View full abstract»

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  • Apollo computing evolution [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 17 - 22
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    The paper presents the evolution of electronics and data processing for the Apollo mission project. It focusses on the development of the computer system for this space mission. View full abstract»

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  • Flight control goes digital [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 23 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3463 KB)  

    This article provides a historical review of the development of digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) systems at NASA, running up to the avionics used in the Space Shuttle. The impact of the DFBW project conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on the overall evolution and performance of flight control systems is also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Unmanned satellites [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 29 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2018 KB)  

    The objective of early unmanned satellites was to demonstrate reliable launch and on orbit operations, plus investigate instrumentation and data communications technology. Although government agencies were interested in satellites in space, commercial participants hesitated. Their concerns related to launch and satellite reliability plus equipment performance. View full abstract»

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  • Satellite communications (SATCOMs) [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 32 - 37
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    NASA's R&D programs jump-started the SATCOM industry but were interrupted in 1973 in an attempt to get satellite manufacturers to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to satisfy their clients, the service providers. The technology provided by NASA would not have been affordable for public service users without this initial support. After being reinstated in 1978, NASA chang... View full abstract»

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  • Looking ahead [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 38 - 40
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    Unmanned satellite and aeronautics programs continue to provide valuable benefits here on Earth. A near-term Shuttle mission is planned to service and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope to prolong its operating life. The California wildfires were monitored by Earth observing satellites as well as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Space electronics spin-offs are expected to play a role in solving cu... View full abstract»

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  • Appendix 1: NASA Research Center responsibilities [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 41 - 44
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    During the summer of 1958, in response to the Russian (USSR) space launches, Congress passed the National Aeronautics and Space Act, which was quickly signed into law so that the new organization, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, could start functioning on October 1, 1958, less than one year after the launch of Sputnik 1. NASA, with headquarters in Washington, DC, was eventuall... View full abstract»

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  • Appendix 2: NASA in space timeline [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 45 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (876 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Acronyms [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 48
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    First Page of the Article
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  • NASA Center Locations [Part Two, NASA at 50]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Part Two, NASA at 50 [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

 IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine is a monthly magazine that publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments as well as news and information of interest to IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society members.

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Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
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