Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 3 • July-Sept. 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • About this issue

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s): 235
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  • When Computers Were Human

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):237 - 244
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (9020 KB)

    A memorandum dated April 27, 1942, from the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, is reproduced. The memorandum describes a computing facility at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, in which a team of humans equipped with mechanical calculators was organized to assist in aeronautics research. The memorandum reveals much about the state of computing as it existed just before the in... View full abstract»

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  • The Invention and Development of the Hollerith Punched Card: In Commemoration of the 130th Anniversary of the Birth of Herman Hollerith and for the 100th Anniversary of Large Scale Data Processing

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):245 - 259
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (16197 KB)

    A detailed and exemplified account is given on the invention and development of the Hollerith Punched Card from the beginning in 1886 until 1928. The change of use from counting to value statistics is shown. The size of the Hollerith Punched Card was standardized very early. The cards were soon used both for data capture and data punching - the dual purpose punched card. The first Hollerith cards ... View full abstract»

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  • From Invention to Production: The Development of Punched-card Machines by F. R. Bull and K. A. Knutsen 1918-1930

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):261 - 272
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (14910 KB)

    Punched-card machines were in a number of ways predecessors to computers. The punched-card technique was invented in the United States in the 1880s by Herman Hollerith, who continued development for another two decades. His firm later became the main component of IBM. Only two main competitors to Hollerith emerged, Powers in the United States and Bull first in Norway and later in France. This arti... View full abstract»

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  • Happenings

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):273 - 277
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  • Anecdotes

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):277 - 285
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  • Biographies

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):285 - 306
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  • Comments, queries, and debate

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):306 - 308
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  • Reviews

    Publication Year: 1991, Page(s):308 - 313
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Aims & Scope

From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs -- Annals of the History of Computing covers the breadth of computer history.

 

This Periodical ceased publication in 1991. The current retitled publication is IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

Full Aims & Scope