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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date April 1966

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Group

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): c2
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  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 53
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  • Measurement of Respiration Rate from Central Venous Pressure in the Critically Ill Patient

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 54 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    Central venous pressure is measured in critically ill patients. The venous pressure is transmitted to a strain gauge transducer through a catheter inserted into the right atrium or superior vena cava. Through a signal conditioning technique using a low-pass filter with a cutoff at 0.8 c/s, the pulsatile variations related to heart action that are superimposed on the low-frequency respiratory changes are removed. The output of the respirometer is sampled every five minutes by art IBM 1710 control system computer and printed on an output typewriter, together with a number of variables, in a comprehensive patient monitoring system. View full abstract»

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  • Oscillatory Behavior of Respiratory Gas Exchange in Resting Man

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 57 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This study deals with the dynamics of respiratory gas carbon dioxide concentration are three, ten, twenty, and thirty to forty-five minutes and two hours; in oxygen concentration, three, ten, twenty, and thirty minutes and one and four hours; and in respiratory quotient, one, five, ten, and fifteen minutes and two to four hours. exchange in resting man. Spectral analyses are performed on time series representing four-hour continuous records of ventilation, carbon dioxide release, oxygen takeup, end tidal carbon dioxide concentration, end tidal oxygen concentration, and respiratory quotient. Results imply that the temporal behavior of each of these six variables can be characterized by a superposition of a finite set of self-sustained almost periodic oscillations with periods in the range from one minute to four hours and time dependent stochastic variation. In ventilation, carbon dioxide release, and oxygen takeup, individual components have amplitudes of between five and ten percent of mean values and nominal periods of one, four, ten, and twenty minutes and one and two to four hours. Components in oxygen concentration, carbon dioxide concentration, and respiratory quotient have amplitudes of between two and four percent of mean values. View full abstract»

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  • Experimental Determination of a Portion of the Human Vestibular System Response Through Measurement of Eyeball Counterroll

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 65 - 70
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    This work was undertaken to obtain a description of a portion (the otolith organs) of the human vestibular system. The vestibular system is fairly inaccessible; thus, measurement by direct observation is difficult. Previous research has shown that eyeball counterroll is one external manifestation of the vestibular system response. In this work, therefore, an indirect measurement of the human vestibular system response was obtained through the measurement of eyeball counterroll. Human subjects were rotated about an axis through their line of sight at angular velocities varying from 0-20r/min. The right eye was photographed and the angle of eyeball counterroll was determined by an optical correlation process. A mathematical expression for input-output characteristics for rotation inputs was formulated using Fourier curve fitting techniques. This description indicates that subjects with normal vestibular function demonstrate an eyeball counterroll which is a function of angular velocity and position with respect to the vertical. Subjects with known vestibular defects demonstrate a small counterroll. View full abstract»

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  • Microperforation with Laser Beam in the Preparation of Microelectrodes

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 70 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
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    Using a laser beam, spot perforations have been made in the vinyl lacquer insulation of tungsten microelectrodes. To develop the method, the effect of the diffraction of the laser beam on the diameter of the burning point and of the geometric and diffractive conditions in the focusing of the beam have been examined, taking into account the small diameter of the electrode (about 10-15 ¿m) and the thinness of the insulating layer. Using the burning method described here, it has been possible to decrease the effective divergence angle of the laser beam so that the diameters of the holes which are formed on the electrode are mostly 2 ¿m or less. The burning point of the laser beam can be localized with the developed optical method to a desired point on the electrode. The perforation has been performed in saline immersion-liquid to protect the objective and to test immediately formed holes electrolytically. The burning apparatus and method have been explained. View full abstract»

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  • On the Determination of an Optimum Microwave Diathermy Frequency for a Direct Contact Applicator

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 76 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
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    An approximate theoretical analysis is presented for determining the relative heating in a two layer fat-muscle medium due to a dielectric loaded dipole-corner reflector applicator in direct contact with the finite fat layer. The results indicate that convenient applicator sizes, equivalent to those now used at 2450 Mc/s, operating at a frequency in the neighborhood of 750 Mc/s provide the maximum ratio of relative heat per unit volume in the muscle as compared to that in the fat. Experimental data taken with the aid of an electrical model of the fat-muscle layers shows reasonable agreement with the results of the approximate analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Determining Surface Potentials from Current Dipoles, with Application to Electrocardiography

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 88 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (51)
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    This paper presents a method for determining the potentials over the surface of a three-dimensional volume due to internal current sources. The volume may be inhomogeneous and irregularly shaped. The method for determining the potentials uses N simultaneous equations which when solved produce the potentials at N different surface points. The N simultaneous equations are solved by an iterative technique on an IBM computer. View full abstract»

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  • A Regulated Differential Fluorometer for the Assay of Oxidative Metabolism in Intact Tissues

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 93 - 99
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    A fluorometer is described which records the difference in intensity of the light emitted by a fluorescing sample (the biological specimen) and by a reference material. Stabilization of the instrument was achieved by feedback to maintain constant signal level from the reference source in the presence of severe changes in the intensity of the excitation light. Illumination and comparison of the two fluorescent intensities occurs at half the frequency of the ac driving the mercury arc lamp. The necessity for this feature strongly implies that mutually independent fluctuations occur between the intensities of the two arc-lamp flashes for each ac cycle. View full abstract»

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  • Short communications: A novel cardiotachometer

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 100 - 101
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Surface Potential Errors Introduced by the Truncation of the Infinite Series that Represents an Eccentric Dipole

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 101 - 102
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 103 - 106
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  • Announcements

    Publication Year: 1966 , Page(s): 106 - 107
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
Department of Biomedical Engineering