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Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 2007

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C1 - C4
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  • IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology publication information

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C2
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  • Introduction to the Special Section on Multiview Video Coding

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1433 - 1435
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (863 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The 11 papers in this special section focus on multiview video coding. View full abstract»

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  • Multiview Video Coding Using View Interpolation and Color Correction

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1436 - 1449
    Cited by:  Papers (56)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2182 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Neighboring views must be highly correlated in multiview video systems. We should therefore use various neighboring views to efficiently compress videos. There are many approaches to doing this. However, most of these treat pictures of other views in the same way as they treat pictures of the current view, i.e., pictures of other views are used as reference pictures (inter-view prediction). We introduce two approaches to improving compression efficiency in this paper. The first is by synthesizing pictures at a given time and a given position by using view interpolation and using them as reference pictures (view-interpolation prediction). In other words, we tried to compensate for geometry to obtain precise predictions. The second approach is to correct the luminance and chrominance of other views by using lookup tables to compensate for photoelectric variations in individual cameras. We implemented these ideas in H.264/AVC with inter-view prediction and confirmed that they worked well. The experimental results revealed that these ideas can reduce the number of generated bits by approximately 15% without loss of PSNR. View full abstract»

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  • Multiple Color and Depth Video Coding Using a Hierarchical Representation

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1450 - 1460
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2896 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents coding schemes for multiple color and depth video using a hierarchical representation. We use the concept of layered depth image (LDI) to represent and process multiview video with depth. After converting those data to the proposed representation, we encode color, depth, and auxiliary data representing the hierarchical structure, respectively. Two kinds of preprocessing approaches are proposed for multiple color and depth components. In order to compress auxiliary data, we have employed a near lossless coding method. Finally, we have reconstructed the original viewpoints successfully from the decoded LDI frames. From our experiments, we realize that the proposed approach is useful for dealing with multiple color and depth data simultaneously. View full abstract»

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  • Efficient Prediction Structures for Multiview Video Coding

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1461 - 1473
    Cited by:  Papers (272)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2626 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An experimental analysis of multiview video coding (MVC) for various temporal and inter-view prediction structures is presented. The compression method is based on the multiple reference picture technique in the H.264/AVC video coding standard. The idea is to exploit the statistical dependencies from both temporal and inter-view reference pictures for motion-compensated prediction. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by an experimental analysis of temporal versus inter-view prediction in terms of the Lagrange cost function. The results show that prediction with temporal reference pictures is highly efficient, but for 20% of a picture's blocks on average prediction with reference pictures from adjacent views is more efficient. Hierarchical B pictures are used as basic structure for temporal prediction. Their advantages are combined with inter-view prediction for different temporal hierarchy levels, starting from simulcast coding with no inter-view prediction up to full level inter-view prediction. When using inter-view prediction at key picture temporal levels, average gains of 1.4-dB peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) are reported, while additionally using inter-view prediction at nonkey picture temporal levels, average gains of 1.6-dB PSNR are reported. For some cases, gains of more than 3 dB, corresponding to bit-rate savings of up to 50%, are obtained. View full abstract»

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  • Motion and Disparity Compensated Coding for Multiview Video

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1474 - 1484
    Cited by:  Papers (46)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (612 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We investigate the rate-distortion efficiency of motion and disparity compensated coding for multiview video. Disparity compensation exploits the correlation among the view sequences and motion compensation makes use of the temporal correlation within each view sequence. We define a matrix of pictures with N view sequences, each with K temporally successive pictures. For experimental coding purposes, a scheme based on H.264/AVC is devised. We assess the overall rate-distortion efficiency for matrices of pictures of various dimensions (N, K). Moreover, we discuss the impact of inaccurate disparity compensation within a matrix of pictures. Finally, we propose and discuss a theoretical model for multiview video coding that explains our experimental observations. Performance bounds are presented for high rates. View full abstract»

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  • View Scalable Multiview Video Coding Using 3-D Warping With Depth Map

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1485 - 1495
    Cited by:  Papers (44)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2542 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Multiview video coding demands high compression rates as well as view scalability, which enables the video to be displayed on a multitude of different terminals. In order to achieve view scalability, it is necessary to limit the inter-view prediction structure. In this paper, we propose a new multiview video coding scheme that can improve the compression efficiency under such a limited inter-view prediction structure. All views are divided into two groups in the proposed scheme: base view and enhancement views. The proposed scheme first estimates a view-dependent geometry of the base view. It then uses a video encoder to encode the video of base view. The view-dependent geometry is also encoded by the video encoder. The scheme then generates prediction images of enhancement views from the decoded video and the view-dependent geometry by using image-based rendering techniques, and it makes residual signals for each enhancement view. Finally, it encodes residual signals by the conventional video encoder as if they were regular video signals. We implement one encoder that employs this scheme by using a depth map as the view-dependent geometry and 3-D warping as the view generation method. In order to increase the coding efficiency, we adopt the following three modifications: (1) object-based interpolation on 3-D warping; (2) depth estimation with consideration of rate-distortion costs; and (3) quarter-pel accuracy depth representation. Experiments show that the proposed scheme offers about 30% higher compression efficiency than the conventional scheme, even though one depth map video is added to the original multiview video. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive Local Illumination Change Compensation Method for H.264/AVC-Based Multiview Video Coding

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1496 - 1505
    Cited by:  Papers (30)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2294 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In multiview video, illumination changes can occur due to imperfect camera calibration and variations of the camera position and direction. These characteristics can cause performance degradation in multiview video coding (MVC) that uses inter-view prediction by referring to the pictures obtained from the neighboring views. In order to overcome this problem, an adaptive local illumination change compensation method is proposed. In the proposed method, we compensate for the illumination changes in the macroblock (MB) unit between the current picture and the reference picture under the assumption that the DC component in the MB is influenced by the local illumination changes. By using the proposed method, the compression ratio in the multiview video coding was increased, and a 0.1~0.6 dB peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) improvement was obtained compared with the case where the proposed method was not used. View full abstract»

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  • Time-Varying Mesh Compression Using an Extended Block Matching Algorithm

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1506 - 1518
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2363 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Time-varying mesh, which is attracting a lot of attention as a new multimedia representation method, is a sequence of 3-D models that are composed of vertices, edges, and some attribute components such as color. Among these components, vertices require large storage space. In conventional 2-D video compression algorithms, motion compensation (MC) using a block matching algorithm is frequently employed to reduce temporal redundancy between consecutive frames. However, there has been no such technology for 3-D time-varying mesh so far. Therefore, in this paper, we have developed an extended block matching algorithm (EBMA) to reduce the temporal redundancy of the geometry information in the time-varying mesh by extending the idea of the 2-D block matching algorithm to 3-D space. In our EBMA, a cubic block is used as a matching unit. MC in the 3-D space is achieved efficiently by matching the mean normal vectors calculated from partial surfaces in cubic blocks, which our experiments showed to be a suboptimal matching criterion. After MC, residuals are transformed by the discrete cosine transform, uniformly quantized, and then encoded. The extracted motion vectors are also entropy coded after differential pulse code modulation. As a result of our experiments, 10%-18% compression has been achieved. View full abstract»

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  • New Coding Tools for Illumination and Focus Mismatch Compensation in Multiview Video Coding

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1519 - 1535
    Cited by:  Papers (19)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2670 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose new tools for multiview video coding (MVC) that aim to compensate for mismatches between video frames corresponding to different views. Such mismatches could be caused by different shooting positions of the cameras and/or heterogeneous camera settings. In particular, we consider illumination and focus mismatches across views, i.e., such that different portions of a video frame can undergo different illumination and blurriness/sharpness changes with respect to the corresponding areas in frames from the other views. Models for illumination and focus mismatches are proposed and new coding tools are developed from the models. We propose a block-based illumination compensation (IC) technique and a depth-dependent adaptive reference filtering (ARF) approach for cross-view prediction in multiview video coding. In IC, disparity field and illumination changes are jointly computed as part of the disparity estimation search. IC can be adaptively applied by taking into account the rate-distortion characteristics of each block. For ARF, the disparity fields are used to estimate scene depth, such that video frames are first divided into regions with different scene-depth levels. A 2-D filter is then selected for each scene-depth level. These filters are chosen to minimize residual energy, with the goal of compensating for focus mismatches. The resulting filters are applied to the reference frames to generate better matches for cross-view prediction. Furthermore, we propose a coding system that combines IC and ARF. Adjustments are made so as to maximize the gains achieved by using both coding tools, while reducing the complexity of the final integrated system. We analyze the complexity of all proposed methods and present simulation results of IC, ARF and combined system for different multiview sequences based on the H.264/AVC reference codec. When applying the proposed tool to cross-view coding we observe gains of up 1.3 dB as compared to directly using an H.264/AVC cod- ec to perform predictive coding across views. View full abstract»

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  • Multiview Image Coding Based on Geometric Prediction

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1536 - 1548
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1999 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many existing multiview image/video coding techniques remove inter-viewpoint redundancy by applying disparity compensation in a conventional video coding framework, e.g., H.264/MPEG-4 AVC. However, conventional methodology works ineffectively as it ignores the special characteristics of inter-viewpoint disparity. In this paper, we propose a geometric prediction methodology for accurate disparity vector (DV) prediction, such that we can largely reduce the disparity compensation cost. Based on the new DV predictor, we design a basic framework that can be implemented in most existing multiview image/video coding schemes. We also use state-of-the-art H.264/MPEG-4 AVC as an example to illustrate how the proposed framework can be integrated with conventional video coding algorithms. Our experiments show proposed scheme can effectively tracks disparity and greatly improves coding performance. Compared with H.264/MPEG-4 AVC codec, our scheme outperforms maximally 1.5 dB when encoding some typical multiview image sequences. We also carry out an experiment to evaluate the robustness of our algorithm. The results indicate our method is robust and can be used in practical applications. View full abstract»

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  • Progressive Coding of Surface Light Fields for Efficient Image Based Rendering

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1549 - 1557
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (820 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Surface light field is a light field parameterized to the surface of a geometric model. Although this multiview object representation enables rendering of objects from arbitrary views, the data size of a surface light field is huge. In this paper, a compression scheme is proposed. Together with compression efficiency, scalability and fast, memory efficient rendering is considered. To enable such functionalities, we base our compression scheme on a factorized representation of surface light field, and utilize a parameterization of the geometric model to a base mesh for application of wavelet transforms for progressive compression and scalable rendering. Experiments were conducted on a real world and synthetic data to study the compression efficiency and the characteristics of our proposed scheme. View full abstract»

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  • Client-Driven Selective Streaming of Multiview Video for Interactive 3DTV

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1558 - 1565
    Cited by:  Papers (48)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (438 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a novel client-driven multiview video streaming system that allows a user to watch 3D video interactively with significantly reduced bandwidth requirements by transmitting a small number of views selected according to his/her head position. The user's head position is tracked and predicted into the future to select the views that best match the user's current viewing angle dynamically. Prediction of future head positions is needed so that views matching the predicted head positions can be prefetched in order to account for delays due to network transport and stream switching. The system allocates more bandwidth to the selected views in order to render the current viewing angle. Highly compressed, lower quality versions of some other views are also prefetched for concealment if the current user viewpoint differs from the predicted viewpoint. An objective measure based on the abruptness of the head movements and delays in the system is introduced to determine the number of additional lower quality views to be prefetched. The proposed system makes use of multiview coding (MVC) and scalable video coding (SVC) concepts together to obtain improved compression efficiency while providing flexibility in bandwidth allocation to the selected views. Rate-distortion performance of the proposed system is demonstrated under different experimental conditions. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to the Special Section on 3DTV

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1566 - 1567
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (331 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The set of six papers that we invited to this part of the Special Section present extensive reviews of the state-of-the-art in functional building blocks of 3DTV systems. View full abstract»

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  • 3-D Time-Varying Scene Capture Technologies—A Survey

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1568 - 1586
    Cited by:  Papers (29)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1399 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Advances in image sensors and evolution of digital computation is a strong stimulus for development and implementation of sophisticated methods for capturing, processing and analysis of 3D data from dynamic scenes. Research on perspective time-varying 3D scene capture technologies is important for the upcoming 3DTV displays. Methods such as shape-from-texture, shape-from-shading, shape-from-focus, and shape-from-motion extraction can restore 3D shape information from a single camera data. The existing techniques for 3D extraction from single-camera video sequences are especially useful for conversion of the already available vast mono-view content to the 3DTV systems. Scene-oriented single-camera methods such as human face reconstruction and facial motion analysis, body modeling and body motion tracking, and motion recognition solve efficiently a variety of tasks. 3D multicamera dynamic acquisition and reconstruction, their hardware specifics including calibration and synchronization and software demands form another area of intensive research. Different classes of multiview stereo algorithms such as those based on cost function computing and optimization, fusing of multiple views, and feature-point reconstruction are possible candidates for dynamic 3D reconstruction. High-resolution digital holography and pattern projection techniques such as coded light or fringe projection for real-time extraction of 3D object positions and color information could manifest themselves as an alternative to traditional camera-based methods. Apart from all of these approaches, there also are some active imaging devices capable of 3D extraction such as the 3D time-of-flight camera, which provides 3D image data of its environment by means of a modulated infrared light source. View full abstract»

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  • Scene Representation Technologies for 3DTV—A Survey

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1587 - 1605
    Cited by:  Papers (35)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1666 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    3-D scene representation is utilized during scene extraction, modeling, transmission and display stages of a 3DTV framework. To this end, different representation technologies are proposed to fulfill the requirements of 3DTV paradigm. Dense point-based methods are appropriate for free-view 3DTV applications, since they can generate novel views easily. As surface representations, polygonal meshes are quite popular due to their generality and current hardware support. Unfortunately, there is no inherent smoothness in their description and the resulting renderings may contain unrealistic artifacts. NURBS surfaces have embedded smoothness and efficient tools for editing and animation, but they are more suitable for synthetic content. Smooth subdivision surfaces, which offer a good compromise between polygonal meshes and NURBS surfaces, require sophisticated geometry modeling tools and are usually difficult to obtain. One recent trend in surface representation is point-based modeling which can meet most of the requirements of 3DTV, however the relevant state-of-the-art is not yet mature enough. On the other hand, volumetric representations encapsulate neighborhood information that is useful for the reconstruction of surfaces with their parallel implementations for multiview stereo algorithms. Apart from the representation of 3-D structure by different primitives, texturing of scenes is also essential for a realistic scene rendering. Image-based rendering techniques directly render novel views of a scene from the acquired images, since they do not require any explicit geometry or texture representation. 3-D human face and body modeling facilitate the realistic animation and rendering of human figures that is quite crucial for 3DTV that might demand real-time animation of human bodies. Physically based modeling and animation techniques produce impressive results, thus have potential for use in a 3DTV framework for modeling and animating dynamic scenes. As a concluding rema- rk, it can be argued that 3-D scene and texture representation techniques are mature enough to serve and fulfill the requirements of 3-D extraction, transmission and display sides in a 3DTV scenario. View full abstract»

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  • Coding Algorithms for 3DTV—A Survey

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1606 - 1621
    Cited by:  Papers (131)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1274 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Research efforts on 3DTV technology have been strengthened worldwide recently, covering the whole media processing chain from capture to display. Different 3DTV systems rely on different 3D scene representations that integrate various types of data. Efficient coding of these data is crucial for the success of 3DTV. Compression of pixel-type data including stereo video, multiview video, and associated depth or disparity maps extends available principles of classical video coding. Powerful algorithms and open international standards for multiview video coding and coding of video plus depth data are available and under development, which will provide the basis for introduction of various 3DTV systems and services in the near future. Compression of 3D mesh models has also reached a high level of maturity. For static geometry, a variety of powerful algorithms are available to efficiently compress vertices and connectivity. Compression of dynamic 3D geometry is currently a more active field of research. Temporal prediction is an important mechanism to remove redundancy from animated 3D mesh sequences. Error resilience is important for transmission of data over error prone channels, and multiple description coding (MDC) is a suitable way to protect data. MDC of still images and 2D video has already been widely studied, whereas multiview video and 3D meshes have been addressed only recently. Intellectual property protection of 3D data by watermarking is a pioneering research area as well. The 3D watermarking methods in the literature are classified into three groups, considering the dimensions of the main components of scene representations and the resulting components after applying the algorithm. In general, 3DTV coding technology is maturating. Systems and services may enter the market in the near future. However, the research area is relatively young compared to coding of other types of media. Therefore, there is still a lot of room for improvement and new development o- f algorithms. View full abstract»

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  • Transport Methods in 3DTV—A Survey

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1622 - 1630
    Cited by:  Papers (31)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (747 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a survey of transport methods for 3-D video ranging from early analog 3DTV systems to most recent digital technologies that show promise in designing 3DTV systems of tomorrow. Potential digital transport architectures for 3DTV include the DVB architecture for broadcast and the Internet Protocol (IP) architecture for wired or wireless streaming. There are different multiview representation/compression methods for delivering the 3-D experience, which provide a tradeoff between compression efficiency, random access to views, and ease of rate adaptation, including the "video-plus-depth" compressed representation and various multiview video coding (MVC) options. Commercial activities using these representations in broadcast and IP streaming have emerged, and successful transport of such data has been reported. Motivated by the growing impact of the Internet protocol based media transport technologies, we focus on the ubiquitous Internet as the network infrastructure of choice for future 3DTV systems. Current research issues in unicast and multicast mode multiview video streaming include network protocols such as DCCP and peer-to-peer protocols, effective congestion control, packet loss protection and concealment, video rate adaptation, and network/service scalability. Examples of end-to-end systems for multiview video streaming have been provided. View full abstract»

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  • A Survey of Signal Processing Problems and Tools in Holographic Three-Dimensional Television

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1631 - 1646
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (654 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Diffraction and holography are fertile areas for application of signal theory and processing. Recent work on 3DTV displays has posed particularly challenging signal processing problems. Various procedures to compute Rayleigh-Sommerfeld, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction exist in the literature. Diffraction between parallel planes and tilted planes can be efficiently computed. Discretization and quantization of diffraction fields yield interesting theoretical and practical results, and allow efficient schemes compared to commonly used Nyquist sampling. The literature on computer-generated holography provides a good resource for holographic 3DTV related issues. Fast algorithms to compute Fourier, Walsh-Hadamard, fractional Fourier, linear canonical, Fresnel, and wavelet transforms, as well as optimization-based techniques such as best orthogonal basis, matching pursuit, basis pursuit etc., are especially relevant signal processing techniques for wave propagation, diffraction, holography, and related problems. Atomic decompositions, multiresolution techniques, Gabor functions, and Wigner distributions are among the signal processing techniques which have or may be applied to problems in optics. Research aimed at solving such problems at the intersection of wave optics and signal processing promises not only to facilitate the development of 3DTV systems, but also to contribute to fundamental advances in optics and signal processing theory. View full abstract»

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  • A Survey of 3DTV Displays: Techniques and Technologies

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1647 - 1658
    Cited by:  Papers (83)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (550 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The display is the last component in a chain of activity from image acquisition, compression, coding transmission and reproduction of 3-D images through to the display itself. There are various schemes for 3-D display taxonomy; the basic categories adopted for this paper are: holography where the image is produced by wavefront reconstruction, volumetric where the image is produced within a volume of space and multiple image displays where two or more images are seen across the viewing field. In an ideal world a stereoscopic display would produce images in real time that exhibit all the characteristics of the original scene. This would require the wavefront to be reproduced accurately, but currently this can only be achieved using holographic techniques. Volumetric displays provide both vertical and horizontal parallax so that several viewers can see 3-D images that exhibit no accommodation/convergence rivalry. Multiple image displays fall within three fundamental types: holoform in which a large number of views give smooth motion parallax and hence a hologram-like appearance, multiview where a series of discrete views are presented across viewing field and binocular where only two views are presented in regions that may occupy fixed positions or follow viewers' eye positions by employing head tracking. Holography enables 3-D scenes to be encoded into an interference pattern, however, this places constraints on the display resolution necessary to reconstruct a scene. Although holography may ultimately offer the solution for 3DTV, the problem of capturing naturally lit scenes will first have to be solved and holography is unlikely to provide a short-term solution due to limitations in current enabling technologies. Liquid crystal, digital micromirror, optically addressed liquid crystal and acoustooptic spatial light modulators (SLMs) have been employed as suitable spatial light modulation devices in holography. Liquid crystal SLMs are generally favored owing to the c- - ommercial availability of high fill factor, high resolution addressable devices. Volumetric displays provide both vertical and horizontal parallax and several viewers are able to see a 3-D image that exhibits no accommodation/convergence rivalry. However, the principal disadvantages of these displays are: the images are generally transparent, the hardware tends to be complex and non-Lambertian intensity distribution cannot be displayed. Multiple image displays take many forms and it is likely that one or more of these will provide the solution(s) for the first generation of 3DTV displays. View full abstract»

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  • 2008 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems-engineering the environmental revolution (ISCAS 2008)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1659
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2008 International Conference on Multimedia & Expo (ICME 2008)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1660
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special issue on video surveillance

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1661
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special issue on event analysis in videos

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1662
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The emphasis is focused on, but not limited to:
1. Video A/D and D/ A
2. Video Compression Techniques and Signal Processing
3. Multi-Dimensional Filters and Transforms
4. High Speed Real-Tune Circuits
5. Multi-Processors Systems—Hardware and Software
6. VLSI Architecture and Implementation for Video Technology 

 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dan Schonfeld
Multimedia Communications Laboratory
ECE Dept. (M/C 154)
University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)
Chicago, IL 60607-7053
tcsvt-eic@tcad.polito.it

Managing Editor
Jaqueline Zelkowitz
tcsvt@tcad.polito.it