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Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 2007

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology publication information

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C2
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  • Message From the Editor-in-Chief

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1097 - 1098
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue on Scalable Video Coding—Standardization and Beyond

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1099 - 1102
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (3)
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  • Overview of the Scalable Video Coding Extension of the H.264/AVC Standard

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1103 - 1120
    Cited by:  Papers (1190)  |  Patents (54)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1069 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the introduction of the H.264/AVC video coding standard, significant improvements have recently been demonstrated in video compression capability. The Joint Video Team of the ITU-T VCEG and the ISO/IEC MPEG has now also standardized a Scalable Video Coding (SVC) extension of the H.264/AVC standard. SVC enables the transmission and decoding of partial bit streams to provide video services with lower temporal or spatial resolutions or reduced fidelity while retaining a reconstruction quality that is high relative to the rate of the partial bit streams. Hence, SVC provides functionalities such as graceful degradation in lossy transmission environments as well as bit rate, format, and power adaptation. These functionalities provide enhancements to transmission and storage applications. SVC has achieved significant improvements in coding efficiency with an increased degree of supported scalability relative to the scalable profiles of prior video coding standards. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts for extending H.264/AVC towards SVC. Moreover, the basic tools for providing temporal, spatial, and quality scalability are described in detail and experimentally analyzed regarding their efficiency and complexity. View full abstract»

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  • Spatial Scalability Within the H.264/AVC Scalable Video Coding Extension

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1121 - 1135
    Cited by:  Papers (87)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (854 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A scalable extension to the H.264/AVC video coding standard has been developed within the joint video team (JVT), a joint organization of the ITU-T video coding group (VCEG) and the ISO/IEC moving picture experts group (MPEG). The extension allows multiple resolutions of an image sequence to be contained in a single bit stream. In this paper, we introduce the spatially scalable extension within the resulting scalable video coding standard. The high-level design is described and individual coding tools are explained. Additionally, encoder issues are identified. Finally, the performance of the design is reported. View full abstract»

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  • Interlaced Coding in SVC

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1136 - 1148
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1793 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The scalable extension of AVC scalable video coding (SVC) is a current standardization project of the joint video team (JVT) of the ITU-T video coding experts group (VCEG) and the ISO/IEC moving picture experts group (MPEG). SVC has been initially designed for progressive video. However, even if progressive material is becoming the favorite format for production, broadcasting and consumers equipments, interlaced material is still widely used in the video world and will not disappear in the next few years. The specification of SVC should be finalized in 2007. Thanks to its AVC-based design and its AVC base-layer compatibility, migration from AVC to SVC equipments can be considered in a near future. In this context, interlaced support becomes an important requirement for SVC. This paper presents the main concepts for supporting interlaced coding in SVC. After a brief description of the basics of SVC, the generalizations of AVC interlaced tools are first described. Then main issues related to interlaced video scalable encoding are identified and the new mechanisms introduced in the SVC specification for raising these issues are presented. The paper also discusses related applications side and identifies several use cases illustrating the interest of interlaced support in SVC. View full abstract»

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  • System and Transport Interface of SVC

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1149 - 1163
    Cited by:  Papers (49)  |  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scalable video coding (SVC) and transmission has been a research topic for many years. Among other objectives, it aims to support different receiving devices, perhaps connected through a heterogeneous network structure, using a single bit stream. Earlier attempts of standardized scalable video coding, for example in MPEG-2, H.263, or MPEG-4 Visual, have not been commercially successful. Nevertheless, the Joint Video Team has recently focused on the development of the scalable video extensions of H.264/AVC, known as SVC. Some of the key problems of older scalable compression techniques have been solved in SVC and, at the same time, new and compelling use cases for SVC have been identified. While it is certainly important to develop coding tools targeted at high coding efficiency, the design of the features of the interface between the core coding technologies and the system and transport are also of vital importance for the success of SVC. Only through this interface, and novel mechanisms defined therein, applications can take advantage of the scalability features of the coded video signal. This paper provides an overview of the system interface features defined in the SVC specification. We discuss, amongst other features, bit stream structure, extended network abstraction layer (NAL) unit header, and supplemental enhancement information (SEI) messages related to scalability information. View full abstract»

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  • Transport and Signaling of SVC in IP Networks

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1164 - 1173
    Cited by:  Papers (34)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (645 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The transport of scalable media, and in particular of scalable video conforming to the forthcoming Scalable Video Coding (SVC) technology, presents challenges not only in the video compression technology, but also in transport and signaling. This paper discusses the current status of standardization of the support for scalable media, and SVC in particular, over IP based networks. Both the transport of SVC over the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP), and the signaling support-namely the additional mechanisms in the Session Description Protocol (SDP)-are covered. As it turns out, the support of SVC over RTP is not quite as straightforward as that of nonscalable video bit streams. Specifically, the signaling architecture requires an almost complete overhaul, and new protocol mechanisms need to be introduced into the packetization. View full abstract»

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  • File Format for Scalable Video Coding

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1174 - 1185
    Cited by:  Papers (24)  |  Patents (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2919 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the file format defined for scalable video coding. Techniques in the file format enable rapid extraction of scalable data, corresponding to the desired operating point. Significant assistance to file readers can be provided, and there is also great flexibility in the ways that the techniques can be used and combined, corresponding to different usages and application scenarios. View full abstract»

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  • Optimized Rate-Distortion Extraction With Quality Layers in the Scalable Extension of H.264/AVC

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1186 - 1193
    Cited by:  Papers (64)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (959 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The concept of quality layers that has been introduced in scalable video coding (SVC) amendment of MPEG4-AVC is presented. By using the Quality Layers post-processing to evaluate and signal the impact on rate and distortion of the various enhancement information pieces, a significant gain is achieved: quality layers significantly outperform the basic standard extractor that was initially proposed in SVC. For the standard set of test sequences, in a range of acceptable video quality, an average quality gain of up to 0.5 dB is achieved. Furthermore, the technique can be used for combined (spatial, temporal and quality) scalability. Thanks to the signaling of this information in the header of the network abstraction layer units or in a supplemental enhancement information message, the adaptation can be performed with a simple parser, e.g., at decoder side or in an intelligent network node designed for rate adaptation. View full abstract»

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  • Performance Analysis of SVC

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1194 - 1203
    Cited by:  Papers (111)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (778 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper provides a performance analysis of the scalable video coding (SVC) extension of H.264/AVC. A short overview presenting the main functionalities of SVC is given and main issues in encoder control and bit stream extraction are outlined. Some aspects of rate-distortion optimization in the context of SVC are discussed and strategies for derivation of optimized configurations relative to the investigated scalability scenarios are presented. Based on these methods, rate-distortion results for several SVC configurations are presented and compared to rate-distortion optimized H.264/AVC single layer coding. For reference, a comparison to rate-distortion optimized MPEG-4 visual (advanced simple profile) coding results is provided. The results show that the performance gap between single layer coding and scalable video coding can be very small and that SVC clearly outperforms previous video coding technology such as MPEG-4 ASP. View full abstract»

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  • Mobile Video Transmission Using Scalable Video Coding

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1204 - 1217
    Cited by:  Papers (107)  |  Patents (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1004 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The scalable video coding (SVC) standard as an extension of H.264/AVC allows efficient, standard-based temporal, spatial, and quality scalability of video bit streams. Scalability of a video bit stream allows for media bit rate as well as for device capability adaptation. Moreover, adaptation of the bit rate of a video signal is a desirable key feature, if limitation in network resources, mostly characterized by throughput variations, varying delay or transmission errors, need to be considered. Typically, in mobile networks the throughput, delay and errors of a connection (link) depend on the current reception conditions, which are largely influenced by a number of physical factors. In order to cope with the typically varying characteristics of mobile communication channels in unicast, multicast, or broadcast services, different methods for increasing robustness and achieving quality of service are desirable. We will give an overview of SVC and its relation to mobile delivery methods. Furthermore, innovative use cases are introduced which apply SVC in mobile networks. View full abstract»

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  • Scalable H.264/AVC Video Transmission Over MIMO Wireless Systems With Adaptive Channel Selection Based on Partial Channel Information

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1218 - 1226
    Cited by:  Papers (52)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1981 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present a novel joint application physical-layer design (JAPLD) strategy to cost-effectively transmit scalable H.264/AVC video over multi-input multi-output (MIMO) wireless systems. With this approach, the application layer cooperates with the physical layer to maximize the system performance. First, in physical layer, we propose a new layered video transmission scheme over MIMO: adaptive channel selection (ACS). ACS-MIMO is fundamentally different from parallel transmission MIMO (PT-MIMO). While each bit stream is continuously transmitted through a fixed antenna in PT-MIMO, ACS-MIMO is able to periodically switch each bit stream among multiple antennas. In application layer, Scalable Video Coding (SVC) generates layered bit streams that need prioritized delivery. Then, we obtain the ordering of each subchannel's SNR strength as partial channel information (CI) at the receiver. The partial CI is acquired via the estimated channel state information based on training sequences. The JAPLD strategy we developed in this research shall switch the bit stream automatically to match the ordering of SNR strength for the subchannels. Essentially, we will launch higher priority layer bit stream into higher SNR strength subchannel by the proposed JAPLD algorithm. In this fashion, we can implicitly achieve automatic unequal error protection (UEP) for layered SVC transmission over MIMO system without power control at the transmitter. Experimental results show that the proposed ACS-MIMO system is able to achieve UEP with the obtained partial CI and the reconstructed video peak signal-to-noise ratio demonstrate the performance improvement of the proposed system as compared with open loop PT-MIMO system. View full abstract»

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  • Real-Time System for Adaptive Video Streaming Based on SVC

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1227 - 1237
    Cited by:  Papers (38)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1170 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the integration of scalable video coding (SVC) into a generic platform for multimedia adaptation. The platform provides a full MPEG-21 chain including server, adaptation nodes, and clients. An efficient adaptation framework using SVC and MPEG-21 digital item adaptation (DIA) is integrated and it is shown that SVC can seamlessly be adapted using DIA. For protection of packet losses in an error prone environment an unequal erasure protection scheme for SVC is provided. The platform includes a real-time SVC encoder capable of encoding CIF video with a QCIF base layer and fine grain scalable quality refinement at 12.5 fps on off-the-shelf high-end PCs. The reported quality degradation due to the optimization of the encoding algorithm is below 0.6 dB for the tested sequences. View full abstract»

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  • State-of-the-Art and Trends in Scalable Video Compression With Wavelet-Based Approaches

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1238 - 1255
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1349 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scalable video coding (SVC) differs form traditional single point approaches mainly because it allows to encode in a unique bit stream several working points corresponding to different quality, picture size and frame rate. This work describes the current state-of-the-art in SVC, focusing on wavelet based motion-compensated approaches (WSVC). It reviews individual components that have been designed to address the problem over the years and how such components are typically combined to achieve meaningful WSVC architectures. Coding schemes which mainly differ from the space-time order in which the wavelet transforms operate are here compared, discussing strengths and weaknesses of the resulting implementations. An evaluation of the achievable coding performances is provided considering the reference architectures studied and developed by ISO/MPEG in its exploration on WSVC. The paper also attempts to draw a list of major differences between wavelet based solutions and the SVC standard jointly targeted by ITU and ISO/MPEG. A major emphasis is devoted to a promising WSVC solution, named STP-tool, which presents architectural similarities with respect to the SVC standard. The paper ends drawing some evolution trends for WSVC systems and giving insights on video coding applications which could benefit by a wavelet based approach. View full abstract»

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  • Barbell-Lifting Based 3-D Wavelet Coding Scheme

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1256 - 1269
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1639 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper provides an overview of the Barbell lifting coding scheme that has been adopted as common software by the MPEG ad hoc group on further exploration of wavelet video coding. The core techniques used in this scheme, such as Barbell lifting, layered motion coding, 3D entropy coding and base layer embedding, are discussed. The paper also analyzes and compares the proposed scheme with the oncoming scalable video coding (SVC) standard because the hierarchical temporal prediction technique used in SVC has a close relationship with motion compensated temporal lifting (MCTF) in wavelet coding. The commonalities and differences between these two schemes are exhibited for readers to better understand modern scalable video coding technologies. Several challenges that still exist in scalable video coding, e.g., performance of spatial scalable coding and accurate MC lifting, are also discussed. Two new techniques are presented in this paper although they are not yet integrated into the common software. Finally, experimental results demonstrate the performance of the Barbell-lifting coding scheme and compare it with SVC and another well-known 3D wavelet coding scheme, MC embedded zero block coding (MC-EZBC). View full abstract»

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  • 2008 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems-engineering the environmental revolution (ISCAS 2008)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1270
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  • Special issue on video surveillance

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1271
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  • Special issue on event analysis in videos

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1272
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  • IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Information

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

The emphasis is focused on, but not limited to:
1. Video A/D and D/ A
2. Video Compression Techniques and Signal Processing
3. Multi-Dimensional Filters and Transforms
4. High Speed Real-Tune Circuits
5. Multi-Processors Systems—Hardware and Software
6. VLSI Architecture and Implementation for Video Technology 

 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dan Schonfeld
Multimedia Communications Laboratory
ECE Dept. (M/C 154)
University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)
Chicago, IL 60607-7053
tcsvt-eic@tcad.polito.it

Managing Editor
Jaqueline Zelkowitz
tcsvt@tcad.polito.it