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Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1959

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  • IRE Transactions on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 157
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  • The Editor Reports

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 158
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  • Vector Principles of Inertial Navigation

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 159 - 178
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A vector equation, which is derived from first principles, describes the mechanization of inertial navigation systems for use anywhere in space. A specialized form of this equation applies directly to three-dimensional motion at any speed, any altitude, over an elliptical, rotating earth. The usefulness of this equation is illustrated by working out an example of a system design. Behavior of errors in inertial systems is also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Position Estimation Using Only Multiple Simultaneous Range Measurements

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 178 - 187
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
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    Three-dimensional generalized position-measurement systems are analyzed in this paper. In these systems, target position is obtained by trilateration using only range data collected by a group of v stations located in an arbitrary geometry. The method of maximum likelihood is used to obtain a joint estimator for the target coordinates which makes optimal use of the redundant data when the noise is Gaussian. A simple recursion formula for the estimator is obtained for this purpose and is shown to be convergent. This formula makes it possible to add data from a redundant number of stations at will and in proportion to their relative reliability. Further, it is shown that the recursion formula can be written entirely in terms of the changes in the successive iterative target position estimates. This technique offers a new means of obtaining tracking data on a moving target since it permits changes in target position to be computed directly as new data are obtained. The covariance matrix of the joint three-dimensional estimator is obtained in the case in which the measurement noise is small compared to the distances measured. The mean-square position error, namely, the trace of the covariance matrix, is shown to have a simple form for the general two-dimensional system in which the target and stations are coplanar. The geometry enters the variance expression only through the angles of cut ¿if, which are the angles between the lines joining the target and the stations. View full abstract»

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  • "C.P.I."---A Crash Position Indicator for Aircraft

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 187 - 200
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    A novel, light, simple and inexpensive position indicator for crashed aircraft has been developed and subjected to severe tests. A special pulsed transmitter with trickle-charged batteries and an internal antenna is potted in shock-absorbing foam transparent to radio waves and placed inside a special aerofoil. This device, held on the tail of the aircraft, is released automatically upon detection of any abnormal structural disturbance. Then it tumbles away from the aircraft in time to clear the danger zone, slows down to a safe landing and transmits a distress signal from any position and under wide environmental conditions. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 201
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  • Roster of PGANE Members

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 202 - 208
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 208a
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope