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Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1957

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  • IRE Transactions on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 43
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  • 1957 Pioneer Awards in Aeronautical andNavigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 44 - 47
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  • Communication Management for the Aircraft

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 48 - 51
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    Certain serious problems concerning air safety can be attributed to our poor management of the many ground-to-air intelligence links which terminate in the aircraft. In addition to overburdening the pilot, our present ground-to-air systems do not provide all the functions required for satisfactory aircraft traffic control. This paper describes a possible solution to these problems through a reexamination of our present ground-to-air intelligence-carrying circuits and the design of a Mission and Traffic Control Subsystem which is sufficiently flexible to be utilized in all types of aircraft. View full abstract»

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  • Self-Contained Navigation Aids and the Common System of Air Traffic Control

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 52 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The capability of aircraft to navigate through space and to adhere to prearranged schedules directly determines the nature of the air traffic control system and the ability of this system to keep high density traffic moving safely and expeditiously. In turn, air traffic control concepts and practices can be revolutionized by increased use of new navigation techniques. Such a profound effect on the future system can be affected with automatized airborne deadreckoning equipment with or without the use of advanced techniques such as Doppler or inertial sensing. Properly applied, these aids will help to provide a growing ability to handle the increasing traffic load and at the same time maintain for all users of the airspace a highly desirable freedom and flexibility of movement. The relationship of self-contained aids to other navigation aids, to communications, and to the other elements of the common air traffic control system is treated in this paper. Also discussed are some of the problems involved in the integration of this technique in the over-all system. View full abstract»

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  • Common System Standards

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 57 - 59
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    The words ¿Common System¿ have come to mean something very explicit in air user circles. They refer to a system of three parts for air-traffic control, navigation, and communication for the use of all aircraft, military and civil, in the skies over the United States. To date many ¿black boxes¿ have been invented as small parts of the system and these have been ¿worked into¿ the otherwise undefined system. Just as the television industry some years ago found need for a standard for the ¿signal in space,¿ users of the air need signals in space defined for the three parts of the common system. The following materials suggest the method of producing these standards so as to release the development laboratories on actual equipment design to utilize signals to be radiated or received on aircraft and on the ground in the manner best suited to the particular application at hand. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements for a New Universal Air Traffic Control Simulator

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 59 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This paper summarizes the role of dynamic simulation to date in helping solve current and future air-traffic control and navigation problems, and in evaluating proposed system concepts, control philosophies, procedures and equipments. A brief description is given of the CAA Technical Development Center's electromechanical -optical simulator, and some of its present limitations are outlined. Some of the more important requirements for a new universal simulator are presented and discussed both in terms of their necessity and their technical feasibility in view of the present state of the art. The requirements are broken down into four areas: target generation, communications, displays, and data reduction and analysis. These areas are viewed both from the standpoints of realism and its effect on simulation and from the standpoint of objectivity vs subjectivity in establishing meaningful criteria for evaluation. The paper concludes with a summary of those items still requiring further study. View full abstract»

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  • Radar Beacon System Performance

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 65 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Conservatively sufficient conditions are found for satisfactory operation of many ground and airborne beacon sets in a relatively small area. Necessary conditions must be found in some more tedious manner, since several simplifying assumptions are made in the method described here. However, application of the method often allows a short paper analysis to suffice for showing system practicability. The methods suggested for adjusting the sets to allow for desired systemperformance are easily applied. An example of the application of the method is given in order to make the ideas presendted clearer. View full abstract»

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  • Is an Airborne System for Collision Avoidance Operationally and Technically Feasible?

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 72 - 74
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    Two years ago, the scheduled airline industry presented an analysis of the midair collision problem and asked the electronic manufacturing industry to help solve the problem. This paper is a brief status report on the progress to date. It explains why the airlines are interested in a proximity warning indicator, when actually a collision avoidance system is needed, and specifies the airline operational requirements for these two systems. Recent interest of infrared equipment manufacturers in the problem, indicates that this technique might provide, at least, a partial interim solution to the problem. The paper concludes that the field is wide open, providing an excellent opportunity for some manufacturer to make a name for himself by coming up with a satisfactory solution. View full abstract»

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  • Physical Aspects of Collision Avoidance

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 75 - 81
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    Both ground-based ATC (Air Traffic Control) and airborne CAS (Collision Avoidance Systems) are needed now and in the future to cope with the problem of collision aloft. They should be considered mutually complementary. The limited form of the CAS known as a PWI (Proximity Warning Indicator) is believed not to be sufficient for safety. The two essential elements of a CAS are 1) an indication of the effective maneuver to secure adequate miss distance, and 2) effective means for discovering and assessing the original risk. Miss distance produced by a maneuver never exceeds maneuver displacement. The ratio of the two may be low unless escape time is of the order of 30 seconds or more. In nearly all cases increasing escape time is more effective to insure adequate miss distance than is increasing maneuver severity. The preferred form of CAS would be self-sufficient, but this form appears not to be feasible for basic physical reasons. Cooperative CAS presents many problems, but is believed to have sufficient promise of success to justify careful study and substantial development effort. View full abstract»

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  • Systems Analysis Approach to the Choice of a Long Distance Navaid

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 82
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    This paper describes and evaluates the various factors involved in selecting an all-weather, general-purpose, type of navigation system for the radio guidance of civil and military aircraft of all types at long distances from ground-based transmitters. An analysis is made of the factors which affect the range, accuracy, reliability, cost, suitability, and operational utilization of available and proposed radio navigational aids for long-range operation in the light of the most recent investigations and requirements of the Air Coordinating Committee and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Considerations affecting the ¿optimum¿ choice of frequencies are presented based upon the most current operational information of radio wave propagation. An ¿optimum¿ frequency of 60 kc is selected, based on minimum transmitter power requirements. A brief description is given of the principles involved in several representative continuous wave and pulse types of radial, circular, and hyperbolic position-fixing aids and a comparison is made of pertinent operational and technical characteristics leading to the choice of a possible general-purpose system for civil and military applications. Consideration is given to the possible improvement in the tolerable signal-to-noise ratio, and consequent range extension, of these systems by the application of cross-correlation, coherent, or synchronous detection techniques. Based upon the above criteria, an all-weather, single-site, combined radial and circular system, designated Navarho, is selected as possessing the greatest promise of fulfilling most of the requirements for a general-purpose, ground-referenced system, yielding information automatically, instantaneously, and directly to the pilot. View full abstract»

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  • Abstracts

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 83
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  • Correspondence

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 84
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    First Page of the Article
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  • PGANE News

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 84 - 86
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  • IRE Professional Group on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 87
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 88 - 89
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  • Roster of Members Professional Group on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 90 - 95
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  • Suggestions to authors

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 96
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 96a - 96b
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope