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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date May 1979

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Image Enhancement of Conventional Transverse-Axial Tomograms

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 253 - 262
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4682 KB)  

    An image processing system for image enhancement of conventional transverse axial tomography (TAT) is described. Conventional TAT means a tomography system in which the X-ray source and X-ray film move in a circular arc about the long axis of the patient, which is a different technique from computerized tomography. In the image processing system described, the original X-ray tomograms are digitized, high-pass filtered, and displayed on a TV monitor. The results of processing several clinical tomograms are shown, and definite improvements in the observed information are noted. The basic technique should be equally applicable to other conventional tomography systems, e.g., linear tomography or hypocycloidal tomography. View full abstract»

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  • Spatio-Temporal Receptive Field Measurement of Retinal Neurons by Random Pattern Stimulation and Cross Correlation

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 263 - 272
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3017 KB)  

    A method is developed for the measurement of the spatio-temporal receptive field (STRF) of neurons in the retina. The test input is an unsteady visual pattern randomly modulated in both space and time, and the output is the stochastic time course of the intracellular response. The STRF is expressed in terms of the spatio-temporal Wiener kernels calculated through a special cross-correlation algorithm between the response and the stimulus-related information. The method is an extension of existing white-noise identification techniques to include the spatial domain. Consideration is given to the practical implementation of the required stimulus pattern, and has led to several alternative approaches. View full abstract»

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  • Simultaneous Single Unit Recording in vitro with a Photoetched Laser Deinsulated Gold Multimicroelectrode Surface

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 273 - 279
    Cited by:  Papers (114)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5215 KB)  

    Flat photoetched gold conductors 12 ¿m wide and 2 ¿m thick, situated on a glass plate and deinsulated at their tips with single 8 ns UV laser pulses, have been utilized to record single unit extra-cellular activity from brain ganglia of the snail Helix pomatia. A fixed array of 36 such conductors, terminating in six rows and six columns in a 0.5 mm x 1 mm area, is capable of monitoring simultaneous single unit activity from numerous neurons. Spike amplitudes of 300¿500 ¿V are generally observed from the predominant 40 ¿m diameter cells of these ganglia. Giant neurons usually produce signal amplitudes of over 3 mV that are simultaneously seen by many electrodes. Signals can be monitored by merely resting a locally desheathed ganglion on the recording area under its own weight in a shallow pool of Ringer. A 10 ¿m diameter crater in a 3¿4 ¿m thick insulation layer has an impedance of 2¿4 M¿at 1 kHz. The capacitance of this metal electrolyte interface is about 0.5 pF/¿m2, suggesting that the UV laser produces a partially colloidal gold surface. With this recessed tip design, simultaneous single unit recording from small neurons appears ensured if electrode impedances are below 4 M¿, shunt impedances are above 30 M¿, and glia cells are not allowed to reinsulate the end of the gold conductor. View full abstract»

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  • Spike Recognition and On-Line Classification by Unsupervised Learning System

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 279 - 284
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3703 KB)  

    An on-line spike recognition system allows separation of multiple spikes present on a single channel, in up to six different classes. The learning phase is unsupervised, and uses the data samples of the waveform as coordinates in a multidimensional feature space. Additional signal characteristics may improve the system performance in special cases. Using the well known nearest neighbor technique, all possible cluster configurations are determined. From this analysis, the investigator selects the physiologically best suited duster layout, primary based on a curve showing the number of clusters versus the maximum distance of two neighboring spikes in the same cluster. This procedure is supported by visual examination of the spikes of each cluster. Statistics are calculated for inter-and intracluster distances, yielding confidence limits for the cluster bounds, and estimates for the quality of separation. During the classification phase, a separate graphic display processor permits continuous control without delay. Each classified spike is projected over its cluster, identifying mean waveform. View full abstract»

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  • A Sample Volume Tracking Unit for Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 285 - 288
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1897 KB)  

    An inexpensive sample volume (SV) tracking unit has been developed for use in pulsed Doppler echocardiography (PDE). The tracking unit allows the SV depth to be modulated by any desired time-varying function. Consequently, artifacts created by wall and leaf-let motion are minimized in the Doppler audio signal. View full abstract»

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  • Effectiveness of Earphone Shielding for Artifact Control in Auditory Evoked Potentials

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 289 - 292
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1612 KB)  

    Control of the electromagnetic artifact produced by earphones is a major problem in the acquisition of surface-recorded auditory evoked responses, especially short latency responses (0-10 ms). Several investigators have used magnetically shielded earphones to reduce the artifact. In this paper, a method for measuring shielding effectiveness is described, and results obtained with a TDH-39 earphone are presented. Two layers of shielding were found to provide 10-15 dB of shielding effectiveness; the resulting artifact is less than 0.1 ¿V for acoustic stimuli below 120 dB sound pressure level (SPL). The shielding also affects the response of the transducer, especially at low frequencies. It is concluded that shielding is effective in controlling artifact for high-frequency transient stimuli. However, for low-frequency stimuli, for which the response begins while the stimulus is present, results obtained with shielded earphones should be interpreted with caution. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic Classification of Spirometric Data

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 293 - 298
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2277 KB)  

    Pattern recognition principles have been applied to 200 sets of spirometric data obtained from pulmonary function laboratory patients. Each patient was classified by a pulmonary specialist as normal, restricted, or mildly, moderately, severely, or very severely obstructed. Each patient was represented by a five-element pattern vector consisting of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), midmaximum flow rate (MMFR), and flow rates with 50 and 25 percent of the vital capacity remaining (V¿50 and V¿25) normalized by predicted values. By Karhunen-Loeve expansion techniques, this vector was reduced to a two-feature pattern vector with only a 6 percent residual mean square representation error. The more important feature essentially represented the average of the three flow rates, while the second feature depended on FVC and FEV1. Data were divided into training and testing sets, and using the former, a parametric Bayes classifier and one-and two-layer pair-wise Fisher linear classifiers, were designed to assign patterns described by the two derived features to one of the six categories. With the testing set, overall recognition rates were 81 to 82 percent, with most errors representing misclassifications within the four obstructive categories. If the four obstructive classes were considered as a single class, the recognition rate increased to about 94 percent. View full abstract»

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  • Airway Flow Patterns During Mechanical Ventilation of Infants: A Mathematical Model

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 299 - 306
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1389 KB)  

    A mathematical model of flow in a patient-ventilator system is developed. The model is solved for conditions which simulate those which occur during mechanical ventilation of the small infant with lung disease. View full abstract»

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  • A Microcalorimeter for Nondestructive Analysis of Pacemakers and Pacemaker Batteries

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 306 - 309
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (686 KB)  

    A microcalorimeter has been built by the authors and used to measure internal losses in primary pacemaker batteries. Power dissipation of 10-50 ¿W has been measured in new pacemaker batteries, much of which is traceable to innocuous exotherm from continuing curing of plastic materials in the battery. True internal shorts have produced 1000-2000 ¿W of heat. Present noise level is about 3 ¿W. A noise level of under 1 ¿W should be achievable. Such a microcalorimeter should prove invaluable for nondestructive early identification of parasitic power losses, both in batteries and in completed pacemakers. View full abstract»

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  • Comments on "An Esophageal Multiprobe for Temperature, Electrocardiogram, and Heart and Lung Sounds Measurements"

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 309
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (257 KB)  

    There are several potential hazards in the use of an esophageal multiprobe such as the one described in a recent paper.1 These hazards must be carefully considered and precluded in the construction and use of such probes in order to safely exploit their advantages. View full abstract»

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  • A System for Determining Long-Term Variations of Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 310 - 311
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (378 KB)  

    A system has been developed which extracts long-term systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate variations from stored blood pressure waveforms. The output is available in analog and digital form and therefore the system may act as both a monitor and a preprocessor for computer or microprocessor. View full abstract»

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  • An invitation to Membership

    Publication Year: 1979
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering Statement of Editorial Policy

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 311-b
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 311c
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
Department of Biomedical Engineering