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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Utilization of Amplitude Histographs to Quantify the EEG Effects of Systemic Administration of Morphine in the Chronically Implanted Rat

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 673 - 678
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3492 KB)  

    Recent evidence suggests that EEG amplitude analysis may be an important method for distinguishing and quantifying alterations in the EEG. This review describes the use of several indices, namely, the standard amplitude, skewness, and kurtosis as sensitive and reliable indices of these amplitude distributions. We have demonstrated that the centile indices for skewness and kurtosis provide a computer-efficient method for obtaining these measures on a real-time basis and can be used to quantify, the EEG effects of systemic injection of morphine or barbiturate anesthetic agents. Consequently, these indices can serve as important measures in the statistical evaluation of the effect of drug-induced modifications of spontaneous electrical activity of the brain. View full abstract»

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  • Comparison of Algorithms for the Closed-Loop Control of Blood Glucose Using the Artificial Beta Cell

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 678 - 687
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5402 KB)  

    Over the past 15 years, several algorithms have been proposed and used for closed-loop blood glucose regulation. Their intent is to artificially replace the normal responses of the pancreatic beta cell absent in insulin-dependent diabetes. All of these algorithms calculate insulin infusion rates on the basis of minute-by-minute measurements of whole blood glucose concentration and its calculated rate of rise or fall. In addition, various techniques are employed to compensate for measurement delay time and the presence of noise in the measured signals. The goal of these feedback systems is to normalize blood glucose in diabetes mellitus. Interestingly, some recently "optimized" versions provide only a near normalization of glycemia in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes, a degree ofglycemic control which is not significantly different from intensified conventional insulin therapy. View full abstract»

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  • Finite Element Calculation of Microwave Absorption by the Cranial Structure

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 687 - 695
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3879 KB)  

    Using an axisymmetric inhomogeneous lossy dielectric model of the human cranial structure, calculations yielding interiorabsorbed power density spatial distributions and whole-body cross sections are presented. These computations are preformed by way of a finite element implementation of the coupled azimuthal potential formulation. Results are considered for two angles of plane wave incidence, with two orthogonal polarizations, at the frequencies of 1 and 3 GHz. Comparisons are made with a simpler multilayered spherical model. Attention is given to the sensitivity of "hot spot" intensities to incident field orientations and model parameter uncertainties. View full abstract»

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  • Pattern Recognition of Canine Duodenal Contractile Activity

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 696 - 701
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2356 KB)  

    An application of statistical pattern recognition technique to the classification of canine duodenal contractile activity resulting from the ingestion of three different test meals, viz. water, acid, and solid, is described. Feature vectors were extracted from the contractile activities recorded by means of strain gauges, and were based on average duration, number, and intensities of contractions, as well as their frequency and propagational characteristics. Pattern training and classification were performed via the Bayes decision rule. The resuits indicate that the three different meals give rise to three different kinds of contractile activities. An improvement in the classifier's performance was observed when it was updated with correctly classified patterns. The results appear to suggest that pattern analysis techniques add a new dimension to the study of gastrointestinal motility in health and disease. For example, pattern recognition techniques can also be extended to identify contractile patterns altered due to such pathological conditions as irritable bowel syndrome and postoperative diarrhea and, hence, elucidate the underlying relationship between contractile activity and distal propulsion of contents. View full abstract»

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  • Physical Principles of the Displacement Cardiograph Including a New Device Sensitive to Variations in Torso Resistivity

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 702 - 710
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2839 KB)  

    The displacement cardiograph (DCG) is a noncontacting device which senses displacements associated with the cardiac cycle through a high-frequency electromagnetic field interaction between a sensing coil and the thorax. The coil is located in the tuning circuit of an oscillator, and perturbations in the oscillation frequency, i.e., frequency quency modulation (FM), resulting from tissue displacements are monitored. The device, originally described by Vas, is similar to earlier devices reported by others. Separation of capacitive and inductive effects with a capacitive shield indicates that the principal interaction is through capacitance, rather than inductance. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that the DCG is relatively insensitive to internal movements as compared to displacements of the precordium. A new technique for monitoring cardiac activity is reported which utilizes the amplitude modulation (AM) of the oscillator. With capacitive shielding, we have successfully recorded waveforms which result from the inductively coupled, reflected resistance in the coil. This AM device does respond significantly to internal movements. View full abstract»

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  • Computer-Controlled Cycle Ergometer

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 711 - 713
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (674 KB)  

    This communication describes a computer-controlled cycle ergometer that generates any dynamic work rate stimulus between 0 and 350 W. The ergometer system features true "zero" watt pedaling and a response time less than 0.5 s. The work rate stimulus is generated via computer software. View full abstract»

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  • A Method for Evaluation of QRS Shape Features Using a Mathematical Model for the ECG

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 713 - 717
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (911 KB)  

    Automated classification of ECG patterns is facilitated by careful selection of waveform features. This paper presents a method for evaluating the properties of features that describe the shape of a QRS complex. By examining the distances in the feature space for a class of nearly similar complexes, shape transitions which are poorly described by the feature under investigation can be readily identified. To obtain a continuous range of waveforms, which is required by the method, a mathematical model is used to simulate the QRS complexes. View full abstract»

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  • X-Ray Compton Scatter Imaging Using a High Speed Flying Spot X-Ray Tube

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 717 - 721
    Cited by:  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5027 KB)  

    A system of Compton scatter medical X-ray fluoroscopy is investigated in this research which uses a specially constructed flying spot X-ray tube. The imaging system uses a narrow pinpoint X-ray beam which scans an object in near real time and creates a penetrating frontal view radiograph of variable penetration into the object. The results of our initial work with X-ray Compton backscatter imaging were presented in a previous paper, and this research seeks to demonstrate an improved X-ray generator which allows the radiographs to be produced much more rapidly. One application of the system may be to provide an X-ray frontal backprojection view of the moving heart epicardial surface which could be useful as a noninvasive diagnostic of cardiac function. View full abstract»

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  • Current Distribution Measurements Within the Human Cochlea

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 721 - 725
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2351 KB)  

    The magnitudes of the currents returned through each ground electrode fine of a multiple-electrode cochlear implant array were determined during surgical implantations on two patients. These were often found to be distributed widely to points far from the stimulus electrode site. Further measurements made in in vitro solutions demonstrated that the distributions were due largely to the ground electrode interface impedances being significantly larger than the fluid-path impedances, and demonstrated that distributions could be changed by modification of the ground electrode interface impedances. View full abstract»

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  • Instrumented Force Platform for Postural Sway Studies

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 725 - 729
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (805 KB)  

    A force platform has been developed, which is capable of measuring postural sway in humans in two orthogonal directions. For each direction, output data consist of total average sway in two frequency bands centered on 0.57 and 2.9 Hz. The device is suitable for use in research or in a clinical setting. View full abstract»

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  • Addition to "Longitudinal Mixing in a Cast of the Human Larynx"

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 729
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (149 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Call for Papers First Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 729-a
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 729b
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • First Announcement 5th Congress of ISEK

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 729-c
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering Statement of Editorial Policy

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 729-d
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 729e
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
Department of Biomedical Engineering