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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): c2
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  • The Laser Photocoagulating Dielectric Waveguide Scalpel

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 1 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5225 KB)  

    This paper presents the physical theory and engineering development of a new hemostatic scalpel, the photocoagulating dielectric waveguide scalpel. (laser blade). This device has demonstrated a marked reduction in blood loss during surgery of organs where bleeding is normally a major problem, such as the debridement of third-degree burns. The scalpel utilizes an argon laser for optical power (25 W) and a fiber-optic waveguide to flexibly transport the laser radiation to a fused silica scalpel blade. The blade is a dielectric waveguide which carries the laser radiation to a tapered cutting edge which is used for the mechanical incision of tissue and provides the means by which the laser radiation couples (tapered waveguide coupling) into the surrounding tissue for photocoagulation. The optical characteristics of the blade are analyzed and experimentally verified. View full abstract»

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  • Mathematical Investigation of Populations of Coupled Synthesized Relaxation Oscillators Representing Biological Rhythms

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 10 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    Mathematical investigation of populations of coupled synthesized relaxation oscillators (SRO's) is presented whereby firstly, the generic equation of the population is described; secondly, synchronization conditions are derived: and thirdly, entrainment of an SRO by a rectangular stimulus is investigated and a theoretical strength-duration curve is derived. An illustrative example is given wherein two bidirectionally coupled SRO's are simulated on a minicomputer to verify the theoretical synchronization conditions. View full abstract»

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  • Microcomputer Generation of Dynamic Stereo Graphics for Clinical Use

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 15 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6162 KB)  

    A programmable device for creating a variety of visual stimuli is described. Employing a microprocessor for overall control permits flexibility in choice of images, while time-critical functions are performed by semi-independent modules of digital logic. The display unit is a modified commercial television receiver. Both clinical and research applications can be supported. View full abstract»

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  • Biomedical Engineering Education: Enrollment, Courses, Degrees, and Employment

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 22 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
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    During the 1979-1980 academic year a two-page questionnaire on biomedical engineering education was sent to 251 engineering schools. 71 schools indicated that they had degree programs and an additional 35 indicated that they had official minor or option programs, 107 did not have a program, and 38 did not respond. For schools offering degrees in biomedical engineering, there were 2859 students enrolled in 37 B.S. programs, 830 students in 48 M.S. programs, and 469 students in 41 Ph.D. programs. Options or minors in biomedical engineering with a degree in another engineering discipline were available at the B.S. level at 41 schools, at the M.S. level at 42 schools, and at the Ph.D. level at 34 schools. Over the past two years, schools offered 109 courses in biomedical instrumentation, 74 in computers in medicine, 162 in physiological systems/modeling, 60 in biomechanics, 47 in biomaterials, 33 in hospital internship, 23 in clinical engineering, 9 in biomedical engineering lab, and 67 in other areas. During the academic year 1978-1979, schools awarded 464 B.S. degrees, 249 M.S. degrees, and 107 Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering. Of these graduates, 253 found jobs in industry, 23 in government, 35 in academia, and 66 in hospitals or clinics; 100 went to medical school, 96 to biomedical engineering graduate schools, and 57 to other graduate or professional schools. View full abstract»

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  • Temperature-Time Profile in Rats Subjected to Selective Microwave Irradiation of the Brain

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 29 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1861 KB)  

    Real-time cortical and colonic temperature changes in rats irradiated for 20 min by a 2450 MHz contact radiator at the animals head were measured. Ten ¿s pulses were delivered to the radiator at pulse repetition rates of 25-500 pulses/s and at energy rates of 0.3 to 1325 mW that corresponded to incident power densities of 0.18 to 875 mW/cm2. Lower power densities yielded a small cortical temperature increase below that for the body core whereas higher power densities produced a greater cortical temperature rise. Even at an incident power density as high as 875 mW/cm2 that resulted in a specific absorption rate of 70 mW/g in the brain, the cortical temperature increased by less than 3.0°C while the colonic temperature rose by 0.5°C. The cortical temperature rapidly rose during the initial transient period of irradiation. It soon became nonlinear and achieved a steady-state level around 39°C. From these observations we concluded that the brain temperature was lowered by thermoregulatory processes involving blood circulation, temperature, and mass differences between the brain and the nonirradiated body of the anesthetized rat, and furthermore, the irradiated brain received significant protection from the nonirradiated body. View full abstract»

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  • Quantification of Time-Connectivity Patterns in Rapid Eye Movement Occurrences During Sleep

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 31 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1376 KB)  

    This communication presents accuracy bounds for a parameter (C) based on entropy and conditional entropy measurements quantifies overall clustering (time-connectivity) patterns in rapid movement (REM) occurrences during sleep. In particular, the effect of the characteristics of these time-connectivity patterns on C, as well as the effect of the number of REM's on C, are studied through Monte Carlo simulations. An effort toward the establishment of sampling distributions and related variance bounds for C is outlined, and suggestions are presented for the efficient use of such a parameter with real data. View full abstract»

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  • The Use of the Time Domain Analyzed EEG in Conjunction with Cardiovascular Parameters for Monitoring Anesthetic Levels

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 36 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1138 KB)  

    A simple time domain method of EEG analysis based upon the computation of the frequency and the amplitude of the zeroth, first, and second derivative of the EEG wave has been developed for monitoring the anesthetic level of patients undergoing general anesthesia. This study explores the effectiveness of this EEG analytical system working in conjunction with cardiovascular parameters in discriminating among commonly used anesthetic dosages. EEG features and cardiovascular features were used as variables in a stepwise discriminant analysis on two patient group sets each using a light, medium, and deep dosage level of the agents halothane/nitrous oxide and enflurane/nitrous oxide, respectively. The best overall discriminant prediction of the three 30-patient groups using halothane and nitrous oxide was 86.7 percent correct. The best overall discriminant prediction of the three 30-patient groups using enflurane and nitrous oxide was 90 percent correct. It was felt that these accuracies were sufficient to continue development of this sytem, the next step being the determination of a suitable anesthetic depth scale based upon the use of these and perhaps additional physiological features. View full abstract»

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  • Blood Flow Detection Using the Flat Crossed-Coil Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Flowmeter

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 40 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1930 KB)  

    Arterial blood flow signals have been obtained noninvasively from the posterior tibial artery, the brain, and the region of the heart at proton resonance frequencies of 21.4 MHz and 75 MHz. For these studies, the subjects were placed in a superconducting solenoid electromagnet with a 63.5 cm diameter warm bore, 185 cm long. A flat crossedcoil detector was used. The signals were processed by a synchronous detector. View full abstract»

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  • A Beat-to-Beat Heart Rate Meter

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 42 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1721 KB)  

    A new technique for computing beat-to-beat heart rate using a programmable counter is described. The circuit used is much less complex and consequently more economical than the circuits described elsewhere in the literature. Yet, it achieves acceptable accuracy in the rate measurements. The circuit can be conveniently modified to measure very low-frequency physiological phenomena such as respiration rate. View full abstract»

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  • A Programmable Temperature-Controlled Microscope Stage for Biomedical Investigations

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 44 - 46
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)  

    A microprocessor-based device was designed to work in conjunction with a Cambion bipolar controller to generate temperature regimens consisting of predetermined rates of heating and cooling interposed with intervals of time at fixed temperature. The composite device is used for maintaining small pieces of tissue at fixed temperature on the stage of a microscope. The device employs four integrated circuit chips including one EPROM. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 47 - 47-a
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering Statement of Efitorial Policy

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 47-b
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 47c
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
Department of Biomedical Engineering