Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, system maintenance will take place from 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM ET (12:00 - 16:00 UTC). During this time, there may be intermittent impact on performance. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5  Part 1 • Date Oct. 2006

 This issue contains several parts.Go to:  Part 2  | Part 3  | Part 4 

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 52
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1 - 1582
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (48 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (36 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Issue on Pulsed-Power Science and Technology

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1583 - 1584
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (97 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Early History of Western Pulsed Power

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1585 - 1609
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2711 KB)  

    The development of submicrosecond pulsed power in the U.K. and USA between 1960 and 1970 is described. Novel short-pulse (tens of nanoseconds) X-ray tubes driven by stacked solid dielectric striplines were devised at the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, Aldermaston, U.K. for radiography. The importance of nuclear weapons effects simulation then motivated a very rapid development of new types of pulse generator in the USA to drive scaled-up tubes of this type. Prominent among these pulse generators were the Marx-driven liquid dielectric pulse lines that form the basis of many present-day pulsed power generators View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Resistance of Spark Channels

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1610 - 1619
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (532 KB)  

    A study undertaken to measure the resistance of spark channels in air with two different current waveforms is presented. In one experiment, the spark was created by a Marx generator. In this case, the gap length was maintained at 12.8 cm, and the current flowing through the spark had a peak current lying in the range of 0.2-2.2 kA. The decay time of the current was larger than 100 mus. In the other experiment, the spark was created by a current generator. In that experiment, the gap length was maintained at 1 cm, and the current flowing through the spark had peak-current amplitudes in the range of 35-48 kA. The decay time of the current was larger than 500 mus. The results show that the resistance of spark channels initially decreases, reaches a minimum value, and then recovers as the current in the spark gap decreases. The minimum resistance of the spark channel decreases with an increasing peak current. The results are compared with various theories that attempt to predict the temporal variation of the resistance of spark channels. The comparison shows that further developments in the existing theoretical models are needed in order to reproduce with better accuracy the dynamic behavior of the channel resistance View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Repetitive Nanosecond-Pulse Breakdown in Tip–Plane Gaps of Air

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1620 - 1625
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB)  

    Repetitive pulsed power is becoming an important area of high-power technology. Dielectric failure data concerning electrical insulation play a basic role, but breakdown has been inadequately studied for the repetitive nanosecond-pulse conditions. This paper is concerned with the breakdown characteristics of tip-plane gas gaps under repetitive burst conditions at variant repetition rates (rep-rates) and diverse gap distances. The relationship among applied voltage, breakdown time lag, number of applied pulses to breakdown, repetitive pulse stress time, and rep-rates is presented. The experimental results presented show that breakdown polarity dependence is not distinct. The data also indicate that significant concentrations of excited particles and residual charges would be formed during the consecutive nanosecond pulses and would present a memory effect that affects the development of gas breakdown. In addition, the detachment of negative ions, cathode collision of positive ions, and deexcitation of metastable species can provide the source of avalanche-initiating electrons View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Novel Trigger Mechanism High-Power Switch: The Electrostatic Plasma Injection Switch

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1626 - 1639
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (998 KB)  

    High-power gas switches like the Pseudospark have been developed for decades, and past research has focused on the trigger mechanism of Pseudospark. This paper presents a new type of switch called the electrostatic plasma injection switch (EPIS), which uses transmission-line reflections of incoming trigger pulse to generate voltage gradients on a vertical multisection trigger structure that extends from a hollow cathode into a symmetrical hollow anode. Low-current preionization glow discharge at the bottom of the cathode region provides seed electrons for fast turn on. The trigger voltage injects plasma into the trigger structure and then accelerates plasma vertically into the gap between anode and cathode. Similar to Pseudospark, a superdense-glow-discharge plasma is responsible for the high current. The trigger electron density is measured by optical spectroscopy to be 3times1015/cm3 inside the hollow cathode and 8times1014/cm3 at the anode-cathode gap. plasma injection speed is 1-4times107 cm/s between 0.1and 0.4-torr pressure and is proportional to pressure and trigger voltage. Delay time decreases when the pressure increases. The EPIS has been operated at 16.6-kV hold-off voltage and 4.96 kA with 95 mtorr of hydrogen. This switch operates in the left-hand branch of the Paschen curve, as do Thyratron and Pseudospark, but it should provide better trigger reliability and higher current capability. Hold-off voltage is limited by local field emission. This device is operational, and waveforms of anode voltage, anode current, trigger voltage, and plasma emissions are recorded. Future applications are discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Particle-in-Cell Model of a Laser-Triggered Spark Gap

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1640 - 1645
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)  

    A particle-in-cell simulation of the streamer formation process in a laser-triggered spark gap has been developed to estimate streamer radius and conductivity under a variety of conditions. The motivation for developing the model was to understand the initial conditions of the switching arc in a laser-triggered spark gap, with the goal of accelerating the resistive decay of the arc. In a parallel plate switch configuration with dimensions of 0.6 mm times 0.3 mm, the electric field was varied from 2 to 5 MV/m, the gas pressure was varied from 1 to 1.5 atm, and the gas type was varied between Ar and Ne. The laser triggering parameters, including the laser ionization rate (from 5 to 20middot1018 s-1), laser spot area (from 1200 to 4800 mum2), and laser spot orientation relative to the electric field, were also varied. The electric field had a large influence on radius, increasing it by 19% with increasing field, and on conductivity, resulting in a 285% increase with increasing field. Among the laser triggering parameters, a linear focal spot-oriented transverse relative to the electric field direction was observed to produce a very large increase in streamer radius View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multichannel and Impedance Analysis of the Laser-Triggered Rimfire Gas Switch

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1646 - 1652
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (515 KB)  

    Many pulsed power applications require multichannel switching because of stringent low erosion and low impedance requirements. Rimfire, which is a multigap multichanneling switch, has been implemented extensively for this purpose at Sandia National Laboratories for several decades, but with incomplete understanding. This paper presents a thorough experimental analysis of impedance and multichanneling characteristics for a multigap switch under the influence of a laser trigger and in an SF6 environment. The implications of these results on the future design of multichanneling multigap gas switches are also presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Electrical Breakdown and Dielectric Recovery of Propylene Carbonate

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1653 - 1661
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (417 KB)  

    Polar liquids are characterized by high permittivity and high dielectric strength. These properties make them appealing dielectrics for use in high-energy storage systems and as high-power switching media. Most of the studies on electrical breakdown and recovery have focused on water as a switch medium in pulsed-power systems. As an alternative to water, the authors have studied the breakdown and dielectric recovery of propylene carbonate (C4H6O 3). One advantage of propylene carbonate over water is its relatively low freezing temperature of -55degC, which allows its use at a high altitude. The permittivity of propylene carbonate is 65, somewhat less than water (81). Its dielectric strength for pulses of 200-ns duration was measured as 2.2 MV/cm, higher than that of water (1.5 MV/cm). A nonlinear increase in conductivity above electric fields of 1.225 MV/cm, assumed to be due to field-enhanced dissociation, was recorded in both cases. The recovery of propylene carbonate is similar to that of water, with plasma decay, shock-wave emission, and vapor bubble formation, except for the very last phase, which is determined by chemical reactions: the generation and decay of polypropylene polymers. This limits the time for dielectric recovery of propylene carbonate switches to values of more than 10 ms View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Poly- \alpha Olefin Synthetic Oil: A New Paradigm in Repetitive High-Pressure Oil Switches

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1662 - 1669
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB)  

    A high-pressure oil switch for high-energy systems has been developed and tested to repetition rates up to 100 pps in burst mode and test voltages to -300 kV. The switch utilizes high-pressure flowing synthetic oil and advanced mechanical designs to achieve high-performance operation at pressures to 17.24 MPa (2500 psi). Experimental data is presented for both single-shot performance as well as continuous repetition rate performance to 20 pps. Electrode lifetime is evaluated for stainless steel and Elkonite to demonstrate electrode lifetime. Evidence is presented in support of the dependence of switching performance on the geometry of the switch View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Impact of Field Enhancements and Charge Injection on the Pulsed Breakdown Strength of Water

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1670 - 1679
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1163 KB)  

    A unique theoretical model of the breakdown mechanism in water has been developed and further tested in both simulation software and experimentation. The conducted experiments test the degree to which electrode material, surface roughness, and surface area impact the dielectric strength of water. Voltage pulses with respective rise times of roughly 200 and 20 ns were applied to a water test gap producing electric fields in excess of 1.5 MV/cm. In experiments testing various electrode materials, thin film coatings of various metallic alloys and oxides were applied to Bruce-profiled stainless steel electrodes, with an effective area of 5 cm2, through ion beam deposition. Similar Bruceprofiled stainless steel electrodes with surface roughness ranging from 0.26 to 1.96 mum and effective areas ranging from 0.5 to 75 cm2 were used in the study of surface roughness and area. Additionally, shadowgraph images of a point plane geometry were taken to further understand the breakdown processes that occur View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Model Analysis of Self- and Laser-Triggered Electrical Breakdown of Liquid Water for Pulsed-Power Applications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1680 - 1691
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2564 KB)  

    Electrical breakdown simulations for liquids, in response to a submicrosecond (~100-200 ns) voltage pulse, are carried out. It is shown that breakdown is initiated by field emission at the interface of preexisting microbubbles. Impact ionization within the microbubble gas then contributes to plasma development, with cathode injection having a delayed and secondary role. The model used in this paper adequately explains experimentally the observations of prebreakdown current fluctuations, streamer propagation and branching, as well as disparities in hold-off voltage and breakdown initiation times between the anode and the cathode polarities. It is demonstrated that polarity effects basically arise from the large mobility difference between electrons and ions. Breakdown is shown to occur either through the application of an overvoltage pulse, or be triggered by an external laser under electrical stress. With laser excitation, a string of point plasma formation is predicted, followed by rapidly propagating streamers and subsequent breakdown. This matches the recent work at Sandia National Laboratories View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis and Comparison of a Fast Turn-On Series IGBT Stack and High-Voltage-Rated Commercial IGBTS

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1692 - 1696
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (486 KB)  

    High-voltage-rated solid-state switches such as insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) are commercially available up to 6.5 kV. Such voltage ratings are attractive for pulsed power and high-voltage switch-mode converter applications. However, as the IGBT voltage ratings increase, the rate of current rise and fall are generally reduced. This tradeoff is difficult to avoid as IGBTs must maintain a low resistance in the epitaxial or drift region layer. For high-voltage-rated IGBTs with thick drift regions to support the reverse voltage, the required high carrier concentrations are injected at turn on and removed at turn off, which slows the switching speed. An option for faster switching is to series multiple, lower voltage-rated IGBTs. An IGBT-stack prototype with six, 1200 V rated IGBTs in series has been experimentally tested. The six-series IGBT stack consists of individual, optically isolated, gate drivers and aluminum cooling plates for forced air cooling which results in a compact package. Each IGBT is overvoltage protected by transient voltage suppressors. The turn-on current rise time of the six-series IGBT stack and a single 6.5 kV rated IGBT has been experimentally measured in a pulsed resistive-load, capacitor discharge circuit. The IGBT stack has also been compared to two IGBT modules in series, each rated at 3.3 kV, in a boost circuit application switching at 9 kHz and producing an output of 5 kV. The six-series IGBT stack results in improved turn-on switching speed, and significantly higher power boost converter efficiency due to a reduced current tail during turn off. The experimental test parameters and the results of the comparison tests are discussed in the following paper View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Radio-Frequency Heating of GaAs and SiC Photoconductive Switch for High-Power Applications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1697 - 1701
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB)  

    The response of a nonlinear opposed contact GaAs photoconductive switch, which is used in high-power microwave generation, was studied for high-power radio-frequency heating effects and compared with a linear-mode SiC switch. Current-controlled negative resistivity behavior was observed at elevated temperature in both cases. Better thermal conductivity and the absence of a heat sink result in a faster temperature increase and in local thermal carrier generation in SiC. Negative resistivity characteristics leading to unstable filamentation and thermal runaway are therefore more severe and occur at a lower bias in SiC as compared with a GaAs switch. To counter such effects, mechanisms to remove excess heat in switches in high-power application must be devised View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimization of Pulsed-Current Profile for Magnetizing High T\rm _ C Bulk YBCO Superconductors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1702 - 1708
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  

    Compared with conventional field cooling (FC) and zero field cooling magnetization methods, pulsed field magnetization (PFM) is a promising way to magnetize high-temperature superconductors (HTS) with the advantage of dramatically decreasing the size and complexity of the electromagnetic charging system. The effects of the amplitude, width, and ramp rate of the pulsed current are reported. Transient responses of the HTS to pulsed magnetic fields are discussed and analyzed. A series of three pulses was found to be adequate to magnetize the HTS monolith with optimal trapped field if proper pulse amplitudes and widths are applied. Experiments verified that the trapped magnetic fields of HTS by PFM were comparable to those obtained by FC magnetization View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Influence of Metal Foil Width on Bonding Strength in Capacitor Discharge Ceramics Joining

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1709 - 1714
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (526 KB)  

    A capacitor discharge joining technique used to fabricate an alumina-(Al2O3) tile-titanium-foil-Al2O 3-tile joint was investigated to clarify the influence of titanium foil width on bonding strength. A several-kiloampere pulse current was supplied from an 8.28-muF storage capacitor to the titanium foil while simultaneously applying a pressure of 8.3 MPa to the joint. The temperature of the foil rapidly increases owing to ohmic heating with a large current. As a result, the titanium foil melts and vaporizes in a short time. The Al2O3 tiles were successfully bonded when the charged voltage in the capacitor was almost the same value as the energy required for vaporization of the titanium foils. The bonding strength increases with the energy input to the foil. The attainable bonding also increases with increasing shear strength from 150 to 300 kg, which in turn increases with increasing foil width from 1 to 7.5 mm for a 50-mum-thick foil. The main reason of the shear-strength improvement was the increase of the joined area that was measured with image analysis of the joint surface View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computer Simulation of Gamma Irradiation Energy Deposition in MOSFET Dosimeters

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1715 - 1718
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)  

    The application of MOSFETs as detectors or device components in pulse power technique requires an investigation of their characteristics in radiation fields. Computing possibilities of the renowned programs FOTELP and PENELOPE for determining the energy deposited in MOSFET structure and dose distribution within microscopic dimensions of the dosimeter sensitive volume were presented in this paper. Based on the obtained results, qualitative conclusions were drawn about the values of energy deposited in different material zones having various dimensions. The difference between the two codes used for calculations in materials physics and semiconductor technics, basically originates from the different physical models for numerical simulation of photon, positron, and electron transport through various materials View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Effects of Pulsed Streamerlike Discharge on Cyanobacteria Cells

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1719 - 1724
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (805 KB)  

    Recently, cyanobacteria blooms (or water blooms) occurred on the surface of water bodies frequently and extensively due to eutrophia of the water. That has posed more and more serious environmental problems worldwide. In this paper, the effects of pulsed streamerlike discharge on M. aeruginosa cells are reported, which are one genus of cyanobacteria and ease to form water blooms. A stainless needle with a diameter of 30 mum was employed as a point discharge electrode, which is 15-cm apart from the cylinder cathode, and a 2-mus 160-kV pulse was applied. A pulsed streamerlike discharge was obtained in the water filled with cyanobacteria cells (named as sample water in this paper). From the experimental result, it can be found that the discharge collapsed the intracellular-structure gas vesicles in the M. aeruginosa cells, and the colonies of the cells sank to the bottom of the discharge chamber and rotten gradually View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pulse Repetition Rate Effect on Nanosecond Pulse Corona Discharge

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1725 - 1730
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (422 KB)  

    Pulsed corona (PC) offers real promise for the degradation of pollutants in gas and water streams. Understanding discharge physics is necessary for developing corona applications. This paper presents an investigation of the dependence of PC current and radiation on pulse repetition rate (PRR). The study was carried out in a wire-to-wire geometry. A corona device with a central high-voltage electrode and two symmetrical grounded electrodes was used for model experiments. A nanosecond solid-state pulse generator SM-2N (100 kV, 5 ns, PRR up to 300 Hz) was used for driving PC discharge. A model expression relating the removal efficiency with PRR is presented. The removal efficiency falls with the increase of PRR at a "constant" flow rate or "constant" residence time. There is satisfactory agreement between the calculated data and the experimental results View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-Power Pulsed Corona for Treatment of Pollutants in Heterogeneous Media

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1731 - 1743
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1243 KB)  

    A technical overview of a European project on pulsed corona (PC) treatment of polluted streams is presented. Versatile high-power systems that are capable of cleaning both aqueous and gaseous streams in heterogeneous media, in either a corona above water reactor or an aerosol reactor, have been developed. Both reactors are capable of high-phenol removal yields from aqueous streams and increase the biochemical oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand ratio for several nonbiodegradable wastewaters to such degree that further biodegradation becomes possible. The PC combined with a catalyst is capable of cleaning gaseous streams that are polluted by toluene, styrene, and malodorous constituents. Reduction rates of toluene that are higher than 99% have been achieved, and very high odor-removal efficiency has been demonstrated. The reliable operation of high-power all-solid-state compact nanosecond pulsers has also been demonstrated. For the second phase of the project, a high-power pulser was designed. One compression stage suffices for the formation of 60-kV 3-J pulses across a reactor that has a discharge impedance of approximately 100 Omega at a pulse repetition frequency of up to 500 Hz; the rise time is 15 ns, and the duration is 100 ns. The system scale-up is also analyzed. The estimated price of water treatment in systems that were scaled up to 50 m3 /h is 2 euro/m3. Incineration of aqueous organic waste streams can cost 500 euro/m3 or more, depending on the nature of the contamination, so the PC water-treatment technology may become highly competitive. It is planned in the future to investigate the cleaning efficiency of the developed processes with different industrial wastes, both at laboratory conditions and in the field View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Feasibility Studies of EMTP Simulation for the Design of the Pulsed-Power Generator Using MPC and BPFN for Water Treatments

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1744 - 1750
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (940 KB)  

    In this paper, a pulsed-power generator that consists of a magnetic pulse compressor (MPC) and a Blumlein-type pulse forming network (BPFN) has been developed. The pulsed-power generator can be operated with high repetition rate, long lifetime, and high reliability for water treatments such as sterilization of microorganisms, decomposition of harmful materials, and ozone generation. An informative explanation about the simulation methodology using electromagnetic transient program was presented in order to give guidance for more efficient design of the pulsed-power generator with MPC and BPFN. The comparison study of the simulation result with the experimental result was carried out. As a result, it was found that the simulation results and the experimental results with the manufactured MPC and BPFN showed a reasonable agreement. In addition, a large volume of streamer discharge was successfully generated in water with the developed system View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Methane-Augmented Microwave Plasma Burner

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1751 - 1756
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (471 KB)  

    In this paper, a microwave plasma burner for generating an enlarged high-temperature and large-volume plasma flame by injecting methane gas into the microwave plasma torch was presented. The air microwave plasma torch explosively burned out the hydrocarbon fuel by high atomic oxygen density. It was observed that the volume of the plasma-burner flame was more about ten times than that of the plasma-torch flame, showing an expanded burner flame. In the comparison of flames, while a conventional CH4 burner reveals the flame of blue color, the CH4 microwave plasma burner shows milky white flame. Also, preliminary experiments were carried out by measuring the temperature profiles of flames along axial and radial directions. Also, we measured the combustion efficiency and reduction rate of NO2 for CH4 plasma burner by employing gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A 4-kV/2-A/5-kHz Compact Modulator for Nitrogen Plasma Ion Implantation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1757 - 1765
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (325 KB)  

    To treat stainless-steel surfaces by nitrogen plasma implantation, a solid-state compact modulator was devised, in which a 8.0-muF capacitor discharges through a forward converter composed of a low-blocking-voltage insulated-gate-bipolar-transistor switch (1.0 kV) and three step-up pulse transformers, rather than employing hard-tube devices such as in conventional plasma ion implantation pulsers, which are expensive and cumbersome. For this, a modulator was built to produce pulses with amplitudes of the order of 4 kV, duration of about 5.0 mus, and rise time of ~1.0 mus with maximum current/frequencies capabilities of 2.0 A and 5 kHz, respectively View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A 100 kV/200 A Blumlein Pulser for High-Energy Plasma Implantation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1766 - 1770
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (207 KB)  

    A high-voltage pulsed power supply of 100 kV/200 A with output short pulses of the order of 1 mus (based on stacked coaxial Blumlein technology) was developed for use in surface treatment of materials by plasma implantation. The plasma implantation process requires pulse repetition and the authors' device is capable of operating at a frequency range of 10-150 Hz, depending on the level of the output voltage. Herein, the authors show that nitrogen-ion species were implanted into stainless steel surfaces (SS304) at high energies (> 30 keV) by using this pulser, inducing alpha phase as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction diagnostic. Moreover, microhardness tests of these treated samples have shown an improvement of about 13.0% for the surface hardness factor View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Plasma Sciences focuses on plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology.

 

 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Steven J. Gitomer, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, US Civilian Research & Development Foundation
Guest Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
1428 Miracerros Loop South
Santa Fe, NM  87505  87505  USA
tps-editor@ieee.org
Phone:505-988-5751
Fax:505-988-5751 (call first)