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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date July 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • Society - The heart of our society ... Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society (AESS) Chapters are the heart of our society

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 27
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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine - Space Education

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 0_1
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  • This month's cover … Correspondence

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 2
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  • Flying free flight: pilot perspective and system integration requirement

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 3 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Sometimes definitions are not as crystal clear as they should be, and in the case of free flight we had a lot of different interpretations. Considering the evolution of aviation from the first experiments, to the pioneers, and then to a well developed and regulated activity, we have reached a point in which the word "free" has a very modest relation with the concept of "freedom to do something". Free flight, as far as we are concerned, means "to flight according to a set of rules that allow choosing better routings and altitudes, use the aircraft at its best performance in terms of flight efficiency, while at the same time providing an improved level of safety. MFF, in respect to the above-mentioned definition, is a bit anomalous, for its "incremental" approach toward free flight starts with applications that are far from the freedom required for a true free flight environment. Even if this approach may seems logical the conceptual difference between the various applications and the final A5 application are so great that they cannot be compared using the same metrics. In the following, a full overview of what MFF gave us and what is needed to transform this experimental experience into real life operations are provided View full abstract»

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  • Implementation of collision avoidance system using TCAS II to UAVs

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 8 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (291 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There will come the day that UAVs can fly into the airspace of manned aircraft in the near future because of the increasing number of operational UAVs, together with technologies development. Since pilots of UAVs are on the ground, the equipment for sensing and avoiding obstacles in front is indispensable. In this paper, the TCAS II, a collision avoidance device for manned aircraft, is implemented to UAVs and investigated for the interfaces of a flight control computer. It turns out that the onboard directional antenna of TCAS II does not provide precise direction information, and the TCAS II is not assumed to be installed alone, but used as supplement with other device which tells precise direction View full abstract»

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  • Growth of cadmium telluride crystals for sensor use

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 14 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (123 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite its intrinsic advantages as a sensor material for the detection of gamma and X radiation, CdTe has proven a difficult material to produce consistently and in sufficient quantities. We report further developments of a vapour phase technique, which has provided significant advantages over current melt growth technologies. Crystals of up to 50 mm in diameter have been produced with increased growth rates up to 12 mm/day View full abstract»

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  • Space education [A Supplement to the IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems Magazine July 2006]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 0_3
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  • Blank page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 4
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  • Introduction - Space education

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_1
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  • Blank page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S2
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  • ISU's 31 approach in space education

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_3 - S_8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (353 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This outlines the origin and fundamental principles of International Space University's approach to space education. The three pillars of this approach: international; intercultural; and interdisciplinary are introduced and their role in shaping ISU's programs is discussed. The educational needs of the space community are addressed, as well as ISU's strategy to meet these needs. This article concludes with a brief discussion of some achievements of this strategy and some plans for the future View full abstract»

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  • Design of pico-satellites for education in systems engineering

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_9 - S_14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (397 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Pico-satellites offer excellent potential to introduce students to hands-on system design. Master and PhD students thus realized the satellite University Wuerzburg's Experimental satellite (UWE-1) with a mass below 1 kg, which is since 2005 in orbit. This article addresses technical details of subsystems, system design, and integration aspects. From the educational side, the integration into the university's computer science curriculum and into the international study program "Spacemaster - Master in Space Science And Technology" is presented View full abstract»

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  • Starting a space studies education program in turkey

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_15 - S_18
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    This is based on the experience in the development of the space studies program at the graduate school of the Turkish Air Force Academy, Aeronautics and Space Technologies Institute (ASTIN). ASTIN developed the program primarily for the needs of the Turkish Air Force and the Turkish Government. This paper includes a brief analysis of the requirements and a discussion of the available capabilities in the country, resulting from a survey of similar programs both in Turkey and the rest of the world. A description of the program which evolved from the effort is also given View full abstract»

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  • A danish perspective on problem based learning in space education

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_19 - S_22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (313 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This describes the goals of the Student Satellite Program at Aalborg University (AAU), and the means for implementing it, namely a concept called problem based learning, which is the cornerstone in education at AAU. AAU has, within the last decade, chosen to focus strongly on education in space technology, not because the country lacks aerospace engineers, but because space projects require the students to think about systems rather than individual modules, while providing problems that are technically challenging for the students to solve. This combination makes the graduates very attractive for industry in general, and not only for the space industry View full abstract»

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  • An overview of space science and engineering education at Penn State

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_23 - S_27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (363 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This provides an overview of space science and space systems engineering education at Penn State University. Students at the graduate and undergraduate levels participate in an educational program consisting of three interdependent components: space systems-related courses, space systems project work, and research. Courses range from Introduction to Space Physics to Spacecraft Design. Student project involvement is realized through a number of student-driven space systems projects completed throughout the past two decades. Students are provided opportunities to do independent study projects, honors theses, M.S. theses, and Ph.D. theses on a number of space science and space systems-related topics. Our educational goal is to prepare students at the undergraduate and graduate levels for productive careers in technical and nontechnical fields relating to space systems. Due to student interest, we are developing a certificate in Space Systems Engineering for undergraduates in the College of Engineering. Strengthening Penn State's position in space engineering are its Center for Space Research Programs, membership in the USAF's Space Education Consortium, and its role in serving as the lead institution within the Commonwealth for the Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium View full abstract»

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  • Blank page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S28
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  • Undergraduate spacecraft design projects

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_29 - S_31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (201 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A problem associated with space education in undergraduate and graduate curricula is the very nature of space engineering. The history of space tells a story of thousands of engineers from a broad spectrum of engineering disciplines along with physicists, chemists, and so on involved from the beginning of space exploration. It is extremely difficult to introduce design into the undergraduate curriculum because of this broad reach of disciplines. Universities and colleges have resorted to "paper designs" for design courses for space-related curricula. This direction ignores the need for a practical approach and results in grandiose and superficial designs that have little chance of success. Senior design projects involving simple spacecraft where actual hardware may be built and launched would be more beneficial to the engineering student. The broad spectrum of disciplines involved in spacecraft or space mission design is actually an important lesson to be learned by engineering undergraduates. Many universities have addressed the multi-disciplinary nature of the modern engineering and, much to the delight of industry; have implemented student design projects involving a number of academic departments, even outside of engineering. Unfortunately, the undergraduate student does not have the level of knowledge to design even a small part of a spacecraft. This paper considers various unique undergraduate space design projects that produce operating hardware and completed within one or two academic years View full abstract»

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  • Blank page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S32
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  • Lunar base design: a paradigm for the capstone design course

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_33 - S_36
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    Most engineering programs have a capstone design course, as per the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) requirements, the recognized US accreditor of college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology. This paper proposes that such a course be placed in a larger and coupled design framework, that is, that all student design groups choose or be assigned a project that considers some aspects of the design of a lunar surface structure intended for human habitation. The senior mechanical and aerospace engineering capstone design course is a two-semester six credit course sequence that is intended to expose each graduating engineering student to the full spectrum of engineering experience. A review is given of the essentials of lunar surface structures design. Example project areas are given View full abstract»

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  • Blank page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S37
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  • AESS [Logo]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): S_38
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  • Small aircraft avionics using hybrid data bus technology

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 17 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a recent study of avionics system design and implementation for small aircraft. Avionic system is one of the most important systems to all kinds of aircraft. For digital avionics system integration, a hybrid data bus is proposed in this development. The proposed hybrid data bus (HDB) adopts some characteristics from time trigger protocol (TTP) in conjunction with the controller area node (CAN) to simplify the data bus structure and enhance system reliability in the applications. The proposed hybrid data bus system is designed and fabricated for test as a preliminary solution. In addition to data bus system, a virtual flight instrument with geodetic information system (GIS) is integrated into cockpit display together with mobile communication surveillance for low altitude flight. The overall system integration brings in a new era of digital avionics for small aircrafts View full abstract»

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  • Low-cost, dual-mode enhanced vision sensor prototype

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 22 - 26
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    As a member of the Southeast SATSLab Consortium and participant in the NASA Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) program, the Rockwell Collins Advanced Technology Center has developed a flyable prototype of a low-cost, dual-mode enhanced vision sensor (EVS). The prototype has been successfully flown on Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's experimental Cessna 310 light twin aircraft. The dual-mode system incorporates an uncooled long wave infrared sensor and a low-light level visible light imager using a common aperture. The system includes a dichroic beamsplitter that provides the same coaxial field of view to both sensors. This paper describes the design, fabrication, sensor performance, and flight test results of the enhanced vision sensor prototype View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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