Computer

Volume 25 Issue 3 • March 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • 'Authentication' revisited (correction and addendum to 'Authentication' for distributed systems, Jan. 92, 39-52)

    Publication Year: 1992
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (119 KB)

    In the article by T.Y.C. Woo and S.S. Lam (see ibid., vol.25, no.1, p.39-52, 1992), the peer-peer authentication protocol needs augmentation, this augmentation is presented and discussed briefly.<<ETX>> View full abstract»

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  • The usability engineering life cycle

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):12 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (135)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB)

    A practical usability engineering process that can be incorporated into the software product development process to ensure the usability of interactive computer products is presented. It is shown that the most basic elements in the usability engineering model are empirical user testing and prototyping, combined with iterative design. Usability activities are presented for three main phases of a so... View full abstract»

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  • SoundWorks: an object-oriented distributed system for digital sound

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):25 - 37
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1404 KB)

    SoundWorks, an object-oriented distributed system that lets users interactively manipulate sound through a graphical interface, is discussed. The system handles digitally sampled sounds as well as those generated by software and digital signal processing hardware. An overview of the different types of sounds and window interfaces provided by SoundWorks and of the operations that modify these sound... View full abstract»

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  • Mediators in the architecture of future information systems

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):38 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (683)  |  Patents (27)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1318 KB)

    For single databases, primary hindrances for end-user access are the volume of data that is becoming available, the lack of abstraction, and the need to understand the representation of the data. When information is combined from multiple databases, the major concern is the mismatch encountered in information representation and structure. Intelligent and active use of information requires a class ... View full abstract»

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  • A taxonomy and current issues in multidatabase systems

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):50 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (70)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1124 KB)

    A taxonomy of global information-sharing systems is presented, and the way in which multidatabase systems fit into the spectrum of solutions is discussed. The taxonomy is used as a basis for defining multidatabase systems. Issues associated with multidatabase systems are reviewed. Two major design approaches for multidatabases, global schema systems and multidatabase language systems, are describe... View full abstract»

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  • The Stanford Dash multiprocessor

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):63 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (411)  |  Patents (76)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2405 KB)

    The overall goals and major features of the directory architecture for shared memory (Dash) are presented. The fundamental premise behind the architecture is that it is possible to build a scalable high-performance machine with a single address space and coherent caches. The Dash architecture is scalable in that it achieves linear or near-linear performance growth as the number of processors incre... View full abstract»

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Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by computer researchers and practitioners representing the full spectrum of computing and information technology, from hardware to software and from emerging research to new applications. 

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Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
Lancaster University
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