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Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1 - c4
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  • IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
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  • Guest Editorial Security in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 217 - 220
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Secure positioning in wireless networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 221 - 232
    Cited by:  Papers (66)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    So far, the problem of positioning in wireless networks has been studied mainly in a nonadversarial setting. In this paper, we analyze the resistance of positioning techniques to position and distance spoofing attacks. We propose a mechanism for secure positioning of wireless devices, that we call verifiable multilateration. We then show how this mechanism can be used to secure positioning in sensor networks. We analyze our system through simulations. View full abstract»

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  • HiRLoc: high-resolution robust localization for wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 233 - 246
    Cited by:  Papers (51)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1000 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we address the problem of robustly estimating the position of randomly deployed nodes of a wireless sensor network (WSN), in the presence of security threats. We propose a range-independent localization algorithm called high-resolution range-independent localization (HiRLoc), that allows sensors to passively determine their location with high resolution, without increasing the number of reference points, or the complexity of the hardware of each reference point. In HiRLoc, sensors determine their location based on the intersection of the areas covered by the beacons transmitted by multiple reference points. By combining the communication range constraints imposed by the physical medium with computationally efficient cryptographic primitives that secure the beacon transmissions, we show that HiRLoc is robust against known attacks on WSN, such as the wormhole attack, the Sybil attack, and compromise of network entities. Finally, our performance evaluation shows that HiRLoc leads to a significant improvement in localization accuracy compared with state-of-the-art range-independent localization schemes, while requiring fewer reference points. View full abstract»

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  • Location-based compromise-tolerant security mechanisms for wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 247 - 260
    Cited by:  Papers (101)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Node compromise is a serious threat to wireless sensor networks deployed in unattended and hostile environments. To mitigate the impact of compromised nodes, we propose a suite of location-based compromise-tolerant security mechanisms. Based on a new cryptographic concept called pairing, we propose the notion of location-based keys (LBKs) by binding private keys of individual nodes to both their IDs and geographic locations. We then develop an LBK-based neighborhood authentication scheme to localize the impact of compromised nodes to their vicinity. We also present efficient approaches to establish a shared key between any two network nodes. In contrast to previous key establishment solutions, our approaches feature nearly perfect resilience to node compromise, low communication and computation overhead, low memory requirements, and high network scalability. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of LBKs in counteracting several notorious attacks against sensor networks such as the Sybil attack, the identity replication attack, and wormhole and sinkhole attacks. Finally, we propose a location-based threshold-endorsement scheme, called LTE, to thwart the infamous bogus data injection attack, in which adversaries inject lots of bogus data into the network. The utility of LTE in achieving remarkable energy savings is validated by detailed performance evaluation. View full abstract»

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  • SCAN: self-organized network-layer security in mobile ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 261 - 273
    Cited by:  Papers (43)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Protecting the network layer from malicious attacks is an important yet challenging security issue in mobile ad hoc networks. In this paper, we describe SCAN, a unified network-layer security solution for such networks that protects both routing and data forwarding operations through the same reactive approach. SCAN does not apply any cryptographic primitives on the routing messages. Instead, it protects the network by detecting and reacting to the malicious nodes. In SCAN, local neighboring nodes collaboratively monitor each other and sustain each other, while no single node is superior to the others. SCAN also adopts a novel credit strategy to decrease its overhead as time evolves. In essence, SCAN exploits localized collaboration and information cross-validation to protect the network in a self-organized manner. Through both analysis and simulation results, we demonstrate the effectiveness of SCAN even in a highly mobile and hostile environment. View full abstract»

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  • A framework for misuse detection in ad hoc Networks-part I

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 274 - 289
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We consider ad hoc networks with multiple, mobile intruders. We investigate the placement of the intrusion detection modules for misuse-based detection strategy. Our goal is to maximize the detection rate subject to limited availability of communication and computational resources. We mathematically formulate this problem, and show that computing the optimal solution is NP-hard. Thereafter, we propose two approximation algorithms that approximate the optimal solution within a constant factor, and prove that they attain the best possible approximation ratios. The approximation algorithms though require recomputation every time the topology changes. Thereafter, we modify these algorithms to adapt seamlessly to topological changes. We obtain analytical expressions to quantify the resource consumption versus detection rate tradeoffs for different algorithms. Using analysis and simulation, we evaluate these algorithms, and identify the appropriate algorithms for different detection rate and resource consumption tradeoffs. View full abstract»

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  • A framework for misuse detection in ad hoc networks- part II

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 290 - 304
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We focus on detecting intrusions in ad hoc networks using the misuse detection technique. We allow for detection modules that periodically stop functioning due to operational failure or compromise by intruders. Combining theories of stochastic coverage processes and approximation algorithms, we develop a framework to counter failure of detection modules, while minimizing the resource consumption. We show that the selection of the optimal set of nodes for executing the detection modules is an NP-hard problem. We present a distributed polynomial complexity selection algorithm that attains the best possible approximation ratio. We next consider a simple heuristic selection strategy that allows for seamless operation in time varying topologies. We obtain analytical expressions to quantify the tradeoffs between the resource consumption and detection rates attained by these algorithms. Using analysis and simulation, we identify the appropriate algorithms for different failure rates, resource limitation, and required detection rates. View full abstract»

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  • Information theoretic framework of trust modeling and evaluation for ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 305 - 317
    Cited by:  Papers (154)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The performance of ad hoc networks depends on cooperation and trust among distributed nodes. To enhance security in ad hoc networks, it is important to evaluate trustworthiness of other nodes without centralized authorities. In this paper, we present an information theoretic framework to quantitatively measure trust and model trust propagation in ad hoc networks. In the proposed framework, trust is a measure of uncertainty with its value represented by entropy. We develop four Axioms that address the basic understanding of trust and the rules for trust propagation. Based on these axioms, we present two trust models: entropy-based model and probability-based model, which satisfy all the axioms. Techniques of trust establishment and trust update are presented to obtain trust values from observation. The proposed trust evaluation method and trust models are employed in ad hoc networks for secure ad hoc routing and malicious node detection. A distributed scheme is designed to acquire, maintain, and update trust records associated with the behaviors of nodes' forwarding packets and the behaviors of making recommendations about other nodes. Simulations show that the proposed trust evaluation system can significantly improve the network throughput as well as effectively detect malicious behaviors in ad hoc networks. View full abstract»

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  • On trust models and trust evaluation metrics for ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 318 - 328
    Cited by:  Papers (153)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Within the realm of network security, we interpret the concept of trust as a relation among entities that participate in various protocols. Trust relations are based on evidence created by the previous interactions of entities within a protocol. In this work, we are focusing on the evaluation of trust evidence in ad hoc networks. Because of the dynamic nature of ad hoc networks, trust evidence may be uncertain and incomplete. Also, no preestablished infrastructure can be assumed. The evaluation process is modeled as a path problem on a directed graph, where nodes represent entities, and edges represent trust relations. We give intuitive requirements and discuss design issues for any trust evaluation algorithm. Using the theory of semirings, we show how two nodes can establish an indirect trust relation without previous direct interaction. We show that our semiring framework is flexible enough to express other trust models, most notably PGP's Web of Trust. Our scheme is shown to be robust in the presence of attackers. View full abstract»

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  • Security and Cooperation in clustered mobile ad hoc networks with centralized supervision

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 329 - 342
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although individual node cooperation is necessary for the correct execution of network protocols in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), it is not always guaranteed. In this paper, we present a node reputation scheme aiming at reinforcing node cooperation in MANETs with centralized control. This scheme was designed for centralized ad hoc network architecture (CANA), an ad hoc enhancement to the HIPERLAN/2 WLAN standard. Misbehavior detection techniques for protocol attacks in both the cluster formation and data transmission phases of the network operation are developed. Statistical methods for selecting the optimal parameters of the reputation scheme are investigated and their efficiency is illustrated through theoretical analysis and simulation results. Throughout this paper, the specific aspects of CANA that impose particular design decisions are outlined and the applicability of our scheme to other network architectures is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Secure data communication in mobile ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 343 - 356
    Cited by:  Papers (26)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (784 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We address the problem of secure and fault-tolerant communication in the presence of adversaries across a multihop wireless network with frequently changing topology. To effectively cope with arbitrary malicious disruption of data transmissions, we propose and evaluate the secure message transmission (SMT) protocol and its alternative, the secure single-path (SSP) protocol. Among the salient features of SMT and SSP is their ability to operate solely in an end-to-end manner and without restrictive assumptions on the network trust and security associations. As a result, the protocols are applicable to a wide range of network architectures. We demonstrate that highly reliable communication can be sustained with small delay and small delay variability, even when a substantial portion of the network nodes systematically or intermittently disrupt communication. SMT and SSP robustly detect transmission failures and continuously configure their operation to avoid and tolerate data loss, and to ensure the availability of communication. This is achieved at the expense of moderate transmission and routing overhead, which can be traded off for delay. Overall, the ability of the protocols to mitigate both malicious and benign faults allows fast and reliable data transport even in highly adverse network environments. View full abstract»

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  • Securing reliable server pooling in MANET against byzantine adversaries

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 357 - 369
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (504 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Reliable server pooling (rSerPool) is an architecture and a set of protocols allowing a service provider to run several servers that can reliably provide the same service. Should a particular server fail while providing its service, another server can efficiently replace it. This property is attractive not only for wired but also for wireless networks. However, the unique characteristics of mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) bring serious reliability and security challenges to the application of rSerPool. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive investigation of the security of rSerPool in MANET against both server failures and, especially, Byzantine attacks. We formulate security requirements for rSerPool in MANET and design efficient, distributed, and survivable security solutions for both main phases of rSerPool: service discovery and service provision. Specifically, we secure the service discovery phase by using a secure multiple-dominating set creation protocol, and the service provision phase by using a novel type of threshold signature scheme. Both protocols address novel security goals and are of independent interest as they can find applications to other areas; most notably, the construction of a distributed and survivable public-key infrastructure in MANET. View full abstract»

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  • Wormhole attacks in wireless networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 370 - 380
    Cited by:  Papers (93)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As mobile ad hoc network applications are deployed, security emerges as a central requirement. In this paper, we introduce the wormhole attack, a severe attack in ad hoc networks that is particularly challenging to defend against. The wormhole attack is possible even if the attacker has not compromised any hosts, and even if all communication provides authenticity and confidentiality. In the wormhole attack, an attacker records packets (or bits) at one location in the network, tunnels them (possibly selectively) to another location, and retransmits them there into the network. The wormhole attack can form a serious threat in wireless networks, especially against many ad hoc network routing protocols and location-based wireless security systems. For example, most existing ad hoc network routing protocols, without some mechanism to defend against the wormhole attack, would be unable to find routes longer than one or two hops, severely disrupting communication. We present a general mechanism, called packet leashes, for detecting and, thus defending against wormhole attacks, and we present a specific protocol, called TIK, that implements leashes. We also discuss topology-based wormhole detection, and show that it is impossible for these approaches to detect some wormhole topologies. View full abstract»

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  • RFID security and privacy: a research survey

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 381 - 394
    Cited by:  Papers (406)  |  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper surveys recent technical research on the problems of privacy and security for radio frequency identification (RFID). RFID tags are small, wireless devices that help identify objects and people. Thanks to dropping cost, they are likely to proliferate into the billions in the next several years-and eventually into the trillions. RFID tags track objects in supply chains, and are working their way into the pockets, belongings, and even the bodies of consumers. This survey examines approaches proposed by scientists for privacy protection and integrity assurance in RFID systems, and treats the social and technical context of their work. While geared toward the nonspecialist, the survey may also serve as a reference for specialist readers. View full abstract»

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  • Secure and resilient clock synchronization in wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 395 - 408
    Cited by:  Papers (45)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless sensor networks have received a lot of attention recently due to its wide applications. An accurate and synchronized clock time is crucial in many sensor network applications. Several clock synchronization schemes have been proposed for wireless sensor networks recently to address the resource constraints in such networks. However, most of these techniques assume benign environments, but cannot survive malicious attacks in hostile environments, especially when there are compromised nodes. As an exception, a recent work attempts to detect malicious attacks against clock synchronization, and aborts when an attack is detected. Though this approach can prevent incorrect clock synchronization due to attacks, it will lead to denial of clock synchronization in such situations. This paper adopts a model where all the sensor nodes synchronize their clocks to a common source, which is assumed to be well synchronized to the external clock. This paper seeks techniques to provide redundant ways for each node to synchronize its clock with the common source, so that it can tolerate partially missing or false synchronization information provided by compromised nodes. Two types of techniques are developed using this general method: level-based clock synchronization and diffusion-based clock synchronization. Targeted at static sensor networks, the level-based clock synchronization constructs a level hierarchy initially, and uses (or reuses) this level hierarchy for multiple rounds of clock synchronization. The diffusion-based clock synchronization attempts to synchronize all the clocks without relying on any structure assumptions and, thus, can be used for dynamic sensor networks. This paper further investigates how to use multiple clock sources for both approaches to increase the resilience against compromise of source nodes. The analysis in this paper indicates that both level-based and diffusion-based approaches can tolerate up to s colluding malicious source nodes and t colluding malicious nodes among the neighbors of each normal node, where s and t are two system parameters. This paper also presents the results of simulation studies performed to evaluate the proposed techniques. These results demonstrate that the level-based approach has less overhead and higher - precision, but less coverage, than the diffusion-based approach. View full abstract»

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  • Special issue on traffic engineering for multi-layer networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 409
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  • Special issue on cross-layer optimized wireless communications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 410
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  • Special issue on non-cooperative behavior in networking

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 411
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  • Special issue on optimization of MIMO transceivers for realistic communication networks: Challenges and opportunities

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 412
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Communications Society Information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c3
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications focuses on all telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Muriel Médard
MIT