IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Volume 27 Issue 3 • July-Sept. 2005

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): c2
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  • From the Editor's desk

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): 2
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  • Historical Reconstructions

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): 3
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  • The ternary calculating machine of Thomas Fowler

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):4 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (626 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 1840, Thomas Fowler, a self-taught English mathematician and inventor, created a unique ternary calculating machine. Recently, all detail of this machine was lost. A research project begun in 1997, uncovered sufficient information to enable the recreation of a physical concept model of Fowler's machine. The next step is to create a historically accurate replica. View full abstract»

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  • The reconstruction of Konrad Zuse's Z3

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):23 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (630 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Konrad Zuse's Z3, built in Berlin from 1938 to 1941 was destroyed during World War II. The reconstruction project started in 1994. A functional replica was built and unveiled at a conference commemorating the 60th anniversary of the public presentation of the original machine in 2001. The reconstruction project includes several Java simulations of components of the whole machine and a 3D functiona... View full abstract»

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  • The IBM 1620 restoration project

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):33 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1059 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This article describes the historical restoration of an IBM 1620 Model I computer by a team of volunteers at the Computer History Museum. The technical trajectory of the project is described as are the philosophical and museological issues attendant on the restoration of vintage computers. View full abstract»

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  • Replicating the Manchester Baby: motives, methods, and messages from the past

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):44 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1007 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The University of Manchester's Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM), known as the Baby, was rebuilt as a replica to celebrate, in June 1998, the 50th anniversary of the running of the world's first stored program. This article explains the background of the original Baby, and why and how a replica of it was built. The article concludes with some of the lessons learned from the project. View full abstract»

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  • The rebuilding of Colossus at Bletchley Park

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):61 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (161 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Rebuilding the Colossus Mk2 computer used in code breaking during World War II has been particularly difficult and challenging - almost nothing remained of the original machines. The original drawings and nearly all the circuit diagrams had been destroyed. Then, too, what Colossus actually did was kept secret until recently. These difficulties have been gradually resolved, however. The result? A w... View full abstract»

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  • The construction of Charles Babbage's Difference Engine No. 2

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):70 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1528 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Charles Babbage designed Difference Engine No. 2 between 1846 and 1848. Contemporary drawings illustrate a machine - never built during his lifetime - that calculates and tabulates polynomials, printing results in hard copy and producing stereotype molds for plates intended for use in conventional printing presses. This article describes construction of the first complete physical realization of a... View full abstract»

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  • Events and Sightings

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):89 - 92
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  • Reviews

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):93 - 95
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  • Anecdotes [Google search engine]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):96 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Biographies

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):98 - 102
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  • Mind and Network

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): 104
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu