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Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

Issue 6 • Date June 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 25
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1 - c4
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  • IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications publication information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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  • Guest Editorial Mobile Computing and Networking

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1129 - 1132
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  • Event-driven messaging services over integrated cellular and wireless sensor networks: prototyping experiences of a visitor system

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1133 - 1145
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (984 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As one of the killer applications, instant messaging has become a simple yet efficient tool for peer-to-peer communications in data networks. In telephone networks, short message services are gaining more popularity as well. However, this kind of services typically operates in their own respective networks and is triggered by fairly simple events (such as pushing a "send" button or prescheduling the transmission at later time). A promising direction is to trigger instant messages by environmental information from the physical world. In light of this, this paper proposes to establish an event-driven messaging service over a cellular-and-sensor-integrated network. We have prototyped a system which adopts Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) as the cellular network, and Bluetooth technology as the sensor network. The latter is to realize a Bluetooth surveillance network with location-sensing capabilities to be deployed within an office building area. While using other technologies is possible, GSM and Bluetooth are two dominating technologies in telephone and data networks. So the proposed technology is immediately feasible, given the fact that many handsets are already Bluetooth-enabled. Through this combination, we demonstrate a visitor system (VS) that offers several attractive features/services for visitors arriving at an office. First, messaging services in VS are driven by preconfigured events which can be collected from the Bluetooth surveillance network. Simple events might be a person entering/leaving a space, while complicated events might be a compound logic statement involving multiple users and multiple locations in VS. Second, we believe that the proposed system justifies the potential of cross-network applications and services. Third, the proposed architecture takes a modular approach by dividing the system into several subsystems according to their functionality. Logically dispatching jobs is the key to future extensions and further value-added services. The system architecture and implementation details are reported. Performance analyses are presented to model the detection latency of a Bluetooth sensor network. View full abstract»

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  • MultiServ: a service-oriented framework for multihop wireless networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1146 - 1158
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to enable fast deployment of new emerging services over multihop wireless networks, it is important to design an efficient service-based platform with the necessary traffic management capabilities. In this paper, we propose a new distributed service-oriented framework for wireless multihop networks, called MultiServ, in which it adopts a quantitative approach toward optimal traffic distribution. Under Multiserv framework, an efficient overlay network can be easily constructed that can greatly facilitate the deployment of new services. We use media streaming and application level multicast as examples to illustrate how the services can be supported. The performance results demonstrate that MultiServ can substantially outperform the conventional approach and achieves comparable performance obtained by a centralized scheme. View full abstract»

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  • A service-centric model for wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1159 - 1166
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (704 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Most of the current research in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is constraint driven and focuses on optimizing the use of limited resources (e.g., power) at each sensor. While such constraints are important, there is a energy for more general performance metrics to assess the effectiveness of WSNs. There is also a need for a unified formal model that would enable comparison of different types of WSNs and provide a framework for WSN operations. We propose a new service-centric model that focuses on services provided by a WSN and views a WSN as a service provider. A WSN is modeled at different levels of abstraction. For each level, a set of services and a set of metrics are defined. Services and their interfaces are defined in a formal way to facilitate automatic composition of services, and enable interoperability and multitasking of WSNs at the different levels. A two-way mapping between two neighboring levels is then defined as a decomposition (from higher to lower level) and composition (from lower to higher level). A composite mapping between metrics at different levels connects high-level, mission-oriented metrics and low-level, capability-oriented metrics. The service-centric model consists of mission, network, region, sensor, and capability layers. Each layer has associated semantics that use lower level components as syntactic units (except for the capability layer). Within each layer there are four planes or functionality sets; communication, management, application, and generational learning. The combination of layers and planes enables a service-based visualization paradigm that can provide better understanding of the WSN. The service-centric model provides a holistic approach to measuring and presenting WSNs effectiveness. In addition, it presents a general and flexible framework in which various more specific WSN models can be represented and evaluated. View full abstract»

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  • Joint connection-level and packet-level quality-of-service support for VBR traffic in wireless multimedia networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1167 - 1177
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (472 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we investigate call admission control (CAC) schemes that can jointly provide connection-level quality-of-service (QoS) (in terms of the new call blocking probability and the handoff dropping probability) and packet-level QoS (in terms of the packet loss probability) for wireless multimedia networks. Stationary CAC schemes are proposed as the results of the solution to constrained optimization problems. A dynamic CAC scheme that can be adapted to varied and varying traffic conditions dynamically is also proposed. The proposed CAC schemes are computationally efficient and easy to implement, thus being suitable for real-time system deployment. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed dynamic CAC scheme achieves better performance when applied to realistic traffic conditions found in wireless multimedia networks. View full abstract»

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  • The dynamics of responsiveness and smoothness in heterogeneous networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1178 - 1189
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Additive increase/multiplicative decrease-based protocols, including transmission control protocol (TCP), TCP-friendly, and a new generation of rate-based protocols, attempt to control the tradeoff of responsiveness and smoothness. Traditionally, smoothness has not been a main concern since it does not impact the performance of regular Internet applications such as the Web, FTP, or e-mail. However, multimedia-driven protocols attempt to favor smoothness at the cost of responsiveness. In general, smoothness and responsiveness constitute a tradeoff; however, we uncover undesirable dynamics of the protocols in the context of wireless/mobile networks with high-error rate or frequent handoffs: low responsiveness is not counterbalanced by gains in smoothness, but instead, produces a conservative behavior that degrades protocol performance with both delay-tolerant and -sensitive applications. Based on our observations, as well as on further analysis of the impact of the bottleneck queue on channel utilization, we seek an alternative strategy for smooth window adjustments. We introduce a new parameter γ, which implements a congestion avoidance tactic and reaches better smoothness without damaging responsiveness. View full abstract»

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  • Using TCP flow-aggregation to enhance data experience of cellular wireless users

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1190 - 1204
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1040 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    All over the world Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) cellular mobile networks have been upgraded to support the "always-on" general packet radio service (GPRS). Despite the apparent availability of levels of bandwidth not dissimilar to that provided by conventional fixed-wire telephone modems, the user experience using GPRS is still considerably poor. In this paper, we examine the performance of protocols such as transmission control protocol (TCP) over GPRS, and show how certain network characteristics interact badly with TCP to yield problems such as: link underutilization for short-lived flows, excess queueing for long-lived flows, acknowledgment bunching, poor loss recovery, and gross unfairness between competing flows. We present the design and implementation of a transparent TCP proxy that mitigates many of these problems without requiring any changes to the TCP implementations in either mobile or fixed-wire end systems. The proxy is interposed in the cellular provider's network, and splits TCP connections transparently into two halves-the wired and wireless sides. Connections destined for the same mobile host are treated as an aggregate due to their statistical dependence. We demonstrate packet scheduling and flow control algorithms that use information shared between the connections to maximize performance of the wireless link, while interworking with unmodified TCP peers. We also demonstrate how fairness between flows and response to loss is improved, and that queueing and, hence, network latency is reduced. We discuss how TCP enhancing proxies could be transparently deployed, and conclude that installing such a proxy into GPRS network would be of significant benefit to users. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of packet interference and aggregated throughput in a cluster of Bluetooth piconets under different traffic conditions

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1205 - 1218
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a Bluetooth piconet, the Master essentially controls the channel. Due to an absence of coordination between independent Masters while accessing the wireless medium, devices will encounter high packet interference if several piconets are simultaneously operating in the same area. Since even a headset and a mobile phone can be connected with a Bluetooth link forming a piconet, it may not be unusual to find tens of independent piconets in crowded places like airports, international conferences, shopping malls, and so on. Study of packet interference is important because interference affects the throughput of a piconet. Motivated by the fact that applications will benefit, in terms of higher available data rate in one direction, by using multiple-slot packets in an asymmetric manner, in this paper, we present an analytical model of packet interference in a cluster of piconets using multiple-slot packets. Also, considering that all the portable devices can have a Bluetooth interface and people are highly mobile these days, it will not be uncommon to find a cluster of piconets of both the 79-hop and the 23-hop types in the same area. We then present an analytical model of interference of multiple-slot packets in a heterogeneous cluster of Bluetooth piconets. By a heterogeneous cluster we mean some piconets are of the 23-hop type and the rest are of 79-hop type. We show how the aggregate throughput in a cluster of piconets degrade under various traffic scenarios, such as 1-slot, 3-slot, and 5-slot packets in symmetric and asymmetric modes in synchronous and asynchronous conditions of Master clocks. Our analytic model is based on the idea of probabilistic graphs, where a node denotes a piconet and an edge denotes the probability of interference between two nodes. Though the 23-hop system has been phased out, our work gives a general approach to model packet interference in multiple, frequency-hopping systems that need not be Bluetooth systems. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive and predictive downlink resource management in next-generation CDMA networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1219 - 1232
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (632 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Guard channels have been proposed to minimize handoff call dropping when mobile hosts move from one cell to another. Code-division multiple-access (CDMA) systems are power- and interference-limited. Therefore, guard capacity in CDMA networks is soft, that is, a given capacity corresponds to variable number of connections. Thus, it is essential to adjust the guard capacity in response to changes in traffic conditions and user mobility. We propose two schemes for managing downlink CDMA radio resources: guard capacity adaptation based on dropping (GAD), and guard capacity adaptation based on prediction and dropping (GAPD). In both schemes, the guard capacity of a cell is dynamically adjusted so as to maintain the handoff dropping rate at a target level. In the second scheme, there is an additional, frequent adjustment component where guard capacity is adjusted based on soft handoff prediction. We show through extensive simulations that GAD and GAPD control the handoff dropping rate effectively under varying traffic conditions and system parameters. We also find that GAPD is more robust than GAD to temporal traffic variations and changes in control parameters. View full abstract»

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  • One-pass GPRS and IMS authentication procedure for UMTS

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1233 - 1239
    Cited by:  Papers (26)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) supports Internet protocol (IP) multimedia services through IP multimedia core network subsystem (IMS). Since the IMS information is delivered through the general packet radio service (GPRS) transport network, a UMTS mobile station (MS) must activate GPRS packet data protocol (PDP) context before it can register to the IMS network. In the Third-Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) specifications, authentication is performed at both the GPRS and the IMS networks before an MS can access the IMS services. We observe that many steps in this 3GPP "two-pass" authentication procedure are identical. Based on our observation, this paper proposes an one-pass authentication procedure that only needs to perform GPRS authentication. At the IMS level, authentication is implicitly performed in IMS registration. Our approach may save up to 50% of the IMS registration/authentication traffic, as compared with the 3GPP two-pass procedure. We formally prove that the one-pass procedure correctly authenticate the IMS users. View full abstract»

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  • Quality-of-service provisioning system for multimedia transmission in IEEE 802.11 wireless LANs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1240 - 1252
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    IEEE 802.11, the standard of wireless local area networks (WLANs), allows the coexistence of asynchronous and time-bounded traffic using the distributed coordination function (DCF) and point coordination function (PCF) modes of operations, respectively. In spite of its increasing popularity in real-world applications, the protocol suffers from the lack of any priority and access control policy to cope with various types of multimedia traffic, as well as user mobility. To expand support for applications with quality-of-service (QoS) requirements, the 802.11E task group was formed to enhance the original IEEE 802.11 medium access control (MAC) protocol. However, the problem of choosing the right set of MAC parameters and QoS mechanism to provide predictable QoS in IEEE 802.11 networks remains unsolved. In this paper, we propose a polling with nonpreemptive priority-based access control scheme for the IEEE 802.11 protocol. Under such a scheme, modifying the DCF access method in the contention period supports multiple levels of priorities such that user handoff calls can be supported in wireless LANs. The proposed transmit-permission policy and adaptive bandwidth allocation scheme derive sufficient conditions such that all the time-bounded traffic sources satisfy their time constraints to provide various QoS guarantees in the contention free period, while maintaining efficient bandwidth utilization at the same time. In addition, our proposed scheme is provably optimal for voice traffic in that it gives minimum average waiting time for voice packets. In addition to theoretical analysis, simulations are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. As it turns out, our design indeed provides a good performance in the IEEE 802.11 WLAN's environment, and can be easily incorporated into the hybrid coordination function (HCF) access scheme in the IEEE 802.11e standard. View full abstract»

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  • A software support infrastructure for wireless access routers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1253 - 1266
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Routers are expected to play an important role in the Internet protocol-based wireless data network. Although a substantial number of adaptive and intercell coordination techniques have been proposed to improve wireless network performance under dynamic wireless channel conditions and host mobility, a system support framework is still missing. In this paper, we describe DIRAC, a software-based router system that is designed for wireless networks to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of various channel-adaptive and mobility-aware protocols. DIRAC adopts a distributed architecture that is composed of two parts: a router core (RC) shared by the wireless subnets, and a router agent (RA) at each access point/base station. RAs expose wireless link-layer information to the RC and enforce the control commands issued by the RC. This approach allows the router to make adaptive decisions based on link-layer information feedback on both data and control planes. It also permits the router to enforce its policies (e.g., policing) more effectively through underlying link-layer mechanisms. It further enables interaccess-point coordination at the RC. As showcases, we implement under DIRAC the prototypes of three wireless network services: link-layer assisted fast handover, channel-adaptive scheduling, and link-layer enforced policing. Our implementation and experiments show that our distributed wireless router provides a flexible framework, which enables advanced network-layer wireless services that are adaptive to channel conditions and host mobility. View full abstract»

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  • Hop count optimal position-based packet routing algorithms for ad hoc wireless networks with a realistic physical Layer

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1267 - 1275
    Cited by:  Papers (39)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Existing routing and broadcasting protocols for ad hoc networks assume an ideal physical layer model. We apply the log-normal shadow fading model to represent a realistic physical layer and use the probability p(x) for receiving a packet successfully as a function of distance x between two nodes. We define the transmission radius R as the distance at which p(R)=0.5. We propose a medium access control layer protocol, where receiver node acknowledges packet to sender node u times, where u*p(x)≈1. We derived an approximation for p(x) to reduce computation time. It can be used as the weight in the optimal shortest hop count routing scheme. We then study the optimal packet forwarding distance to minimize the hop count, and show that it is approximately 0.73R (for power attenuation degree 2). A hop count optimal, greedy, localized routing algorithm [referred as ideal hop count routing (IHCR)] for ad hoc wireless networks is then presented. We present another algorithm called expected progress routing with acknowledgment (referred as aEPR) for ad hoc wireless networks. Two variants of aEPR algorithm, namely, aEPR-1 and aEPR-u are also presented. Next, we propose projection progress scheme, and its two variants, 1-Projection and u-Projection. Iterative versions of aEPR and projection progress attempt to improve their performance. We then propose tR-greedy routing scheme, where packet is forwarded to neighbor closest to destination, among neighbors that are within distance tR. All described schemes are implemented, and their performances are evaluated and compared. View full abstract»

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  • Two-step multipolling MAC protocol for wireless LANs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1276 - 1286
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The IEEE 802.11 standard defines two coordination functions: distributed coordination function (DCF) and point coordination function (PCF). These coordination functions coordinate the shared wireless medium. The PCF uses a centralized polling-based channel access method to support time-bounded services. To design an efficient polling scheme, the point coordinator (PC) needs to obtain information about the current transmission status and channel condition for each station. To reduce overhead caused by polling frames, it is better to poll all stations using one polling frame containing the transmission schedule. In this paper, we propose an efficient polling scheme, referred to as two-step multipolling (TS-MP), for the PCF in wireless local area networks (WLANs). In this new scheme, we propose to use two multipolling frames with different purposes. The first frame is broadcast to collect information such as the numbers of pending frames and the physical-layer transmission rates for the communication links among all stations. The second frame contains a polling sequence for data transmissions designed based on the collected information. This frame is broadcast to all stations. Extensive simulation studies show that TS-MP not only overcomes the aforementioned deficiencies, but also help to implement rate adaptation over time-varying wireless channel. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive downlink scheduling and rate selection: a cross-layer design

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1287 - 1297
    Cited by:  Papers (35)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we discuss a cross-layer design for joint user scheduling and adaptive rate control for downlink wireless transmission. We take a stochastic learning-based approach to achieve this. The scheduling is performed at the medium access control (MAC) layer, whereas the rate selection takes place at the physical/link (PHY/LINK) layer. These two components residing in the two layers exchange information to ensure that user defined rate requests are satisfied by the right combination of transmission schedules and rate selections. The method is highly efficient for low mobility applications with mobile speeds in the order of a few kilometers per hour. While simple to implement, this technique requires no explicit channel estimation phase. The only feedback used are the single bit ACK/NACK signal indicating the correct reception/failure of the packet. As shown in the convergence theorems, the algorithm achieves optimal performance in "stationary" channels. With slowly varying channels, the rate selection algorithm sees a "quasi-stationary" channel and adaptively converges to an optimal solution. Simulations performed using a third-generation wireless system, namely, high-speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) validate the theoretical results. View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers on high-speed network security - architecture, algorithms and implementation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1298
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  • Call for papers on nonlinear optimization of communication systems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1299
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  • Call for papers on multi-hop wireless mesh networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1300
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  • Call for papers on sampling the internet: Techniques and applications

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1301
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  • Call for papers on peer-to-peer communications and applications

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1302
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  • Celebrating the vitality of technology the Proceedings of the IEEE [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1303
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  • IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1304
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  • IEEE Communications Society Information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications focuses on all telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Muriel Médard
MIT