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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 2005

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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 44
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  • Correspondence

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 0_2
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  • IEEE 2005 International Radar Conference

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 38
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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society Chapters

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 46
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  • 2005 IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society - Membership application

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 48
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  • 100 km wins the x prize

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 39 - 41
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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine - cover

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 0_1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - technically

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2
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  • Can LORAN meet GPS backup requirements?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 3 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is currently leading a team consisting of members from industry, government, and academia to provide guidance to the policy makers in their evaluation of the future of Loran-C in the United States. In a recently completed Navigation Transition Study, the FAA concluded that Loran-C, as an independent radio navigation (RNAV) system, is theoretically the best backup for the global positioning system (GPS). However, for Loran-C to be considered a viable backup system to GPS, it must be able to meet the requirements for non-precision approaches (NPAs) for the aviation community, and the Harbor Entrance and Approach (HEA) requirements for the maritime community. Through FAA sponsoring, the US Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) is responsible for conducting some of the tests and evaluations to help determine whether Loran can provide the accuracy, availability, integrity, and continuity to meet these requirements. A major part of assessing the suitability of Loran is in understanding the nature of Loran ground wave propagation over paths of varying conductivities and terrain. Propagation time adjustments, called "additional secondary factors" (ASFs), are used to adjust receiver times of arrival (TOAs) to account for propagation over non-seawater path(s). These ASFs vary both spatially and temporally, and unless understood and/or modeled, we lose accuracy and may not be able to guarantee a hazardously misleading information (HMI) probability of less than 1times 10-7. During the summer of 2003, the Coast Guard Academy, with flight support from the FAA Technical Center, conducted a series of tests to measure ASF variations in the vicinity of several selected airfields in Colorado, Arkansas, Florida, and California. In addition, approaches were flown at several airports in each of these areas. ASF and TOA data collected during these trials has been analyzed through post-processing to determine the Loran position accuracy during app- roaches. The accuracy of raw (uncorrected Loran) as well as ASF-corrected Loran positions are shown for a variety of ASF profiles. Using the BALOR ASF modeling software produced by the University of Wales at Bangor, we have also done some simulations of best-case performance analysis for receivers with little or no noise. In addition, we present some ideas for using a Kalman-filtered integrated Loran-INS receiver to smooth out Loran position errors. Finally, how all of these efforts lead toward meeting the accuracy requirements is shown View full abstract»

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  • Space applications for input pulse shaping filter

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 16 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    A pulse-shaping technique superior to various other existing pulse shaping techniques has been suggested. A practical way of implementing the scheme has been discussed and the results found to be encouraging. New spike suppression (SS). Window function has also been suggested for obtaining low side lobe levels and to suppress spikes in phase shift keying spectrums that exists at high bit rate data transmission. The characteristics such as low side lobe levels and spike elimination have been achieved using new techniques that are essential for space applications View full abstract»

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  • Magnetically suspended MEMS spinning wheel gyro

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 21 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (413 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A concept of a magnetically suspended spinning wheel gyro is described. The gyro is based on a patented, planar magnetic actuator and position sensor configuration with a gyro wheel that is rotated by a multi-phase electromagnetic spin motor. The motor and actuator/sensor configurations, in addition to providing the necessary forces to suspend the spinning wheel, are amenable to fabrication using some of the developing MEMS fabrication technologies, making batch fabrication of the gyro possible. This provide the capability for high production yield in high volume through the use of batch processing, without the need for skilled hand labor, resulting in high yields, high reliability, and low cost of ownership. The gyro concept is described in detail. The high-speed rotation of the wheel, somewhat smaller than a dime, can produce an angular momentum much larger than that of the Coriolis force based MEMS gyros now receiving intensive development, and is expected to provide considerably higher performance than currently available from this class of instrument. Two axes of angular rate information and three axes of acceleration information are provided by the control loops that center the wheel within the case. Thus, two such magnetically suspended spinning wheel gyros can be used to implement a complete IMU, and can also provide redundancy in three of the five degrees of freedom View full abstract»

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  • Star recognition algorithm for APS star tracker: oriented triangles

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 27 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    An efficient star pattern recognition algorithm is presented. The purpose of this algorithm is to make sure of the compatibility of the software and the imaging sensor noise level. The new CMOS APS sensors have not currently reached the same accuracy as the former CCD sensors in position as well as in magnitude determination, especially in the dynamic stages. This algorithm allows the system to recognize the star pattern 20% faster than with reference algorithms. No false recognition has been noticed. Used databases have a size 5 to 10 times smaller, depending on other reference algorithms. Oriented triangles are used to compare the measured star pattern with the catalogue stars. The triangle's characterization criteria propose several solutions in a first time. A unique solution is selected by means of identification and validation methods in a second time. First results, presented hereinafter, are very encouraging, and this algorithm may be used in the future APS star trackers. APS star tracker robustness is significantly enhanced by this method during the critical navigation phases View full abstract»

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  • Distinguished lecturers program

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 32
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  • From the editor-in-chief - Society news & information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 33
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  • Nine AESS Members elected IEEE Fellow

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 34
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  • IEEE call for fellow nominations recognition of practitioner contributions

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 35
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  • IEEE AESS active fellows

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 36
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  • IEEE AESS active live fellows

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 37
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  • Call for participation - Technical Papers, Tutorials & Exhibits

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 42
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  • Technical tracks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 43
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  • ITSC '05 - 8th International IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 45
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  • "Technology - Powering the Next Generation of Test" - Call for papers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 47
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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Magazine

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 49
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  • AESS Meeting & Conference

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 50
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com