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Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science publication information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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  • Special Issue on Plenary and Invited Papers From ICOPS 2004

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Pseudoresonant laser Wakefield acceleration driven by 10.6-μm laser light

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 3 - 7
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    This work describes an experiment to demonstrate, for the first time, laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), driven by 10.6-μm light from a CO2 laser. This experiment is also noteworthy because it will operate in a pseudoresonant LWFA regime, in which the laser-pulse-length is too long for resonant LWFA, but too short for self-modulated LWFA. Nonetheless, high acceleration gradients are still possible. This experiment builds upon an earlier experiment called staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA), where efficient trapping and monoenergetic laser acceleration of electrons were demonstrated using inverse free electron lasers. The aim is to apply the STELLA approach of laser-driven microbunch formation followed by laser-driven trapping and acceleration to LWFA. These capabilities are important for a practical electron linear accelerator based upon LWFA. View full abstract»

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  • Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 8 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultrashort electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching toward a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short-pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offer a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: coherent terahertz emission, and X-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering. View full abstract»

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  • Undulator-induced transparency of magnetized plasma: new approach to electromagnetic energy compression

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 23 - 31
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    It is well known that circularly polarized electromagnetic waves propagating along the magnetic field in the plasma are strongly absorbed when the wave frequency matches the electron cyclotron frequency. This absorption can be eliminated by adding a weak magnetic undulator, leading to the undulator-induced transparency (UIT) of the plasma. Moreover, the group velocity of the waves in the plasma is strongly reduced, resulting in the extreme compression of the wave energy in the plasma. Compressed waves are polarized along the propagation direction and can be used for synchronous electron or ion acceleration. Numerical simulations reveal yet another interesting property of the electromagnetic waves in UIT plasma: strong coupling and conversion between two circular wave polarizations. Depending on how important this cross-polarization effect is, several propagation regimes have been identified and explored by fluid and particle-in-cell simulations. View full abstract»

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  • Gliding arc discharges as a source of intermediate plasma for methane partial oxidation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 32 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Experimental study of intermediate plasma catalyzed partial oxidation of methane is completed and results are presented along with numerical simulations. To establish the best plasma parameters for industrial chemical applications like partial oxidation, the stability mechanism of different plasma sources is reviewed. Various kinds of intermediate plasma sources are discussed for their application to plasma-chemical processes. Diagnostics of gliding arc discharge: electron temperature, gas temperature, current-voltage characteristics, etc. is done. Different configurations of gliding arc such as the gliding arc in tornado and the plasma disc to enhance intermediate plasma properties are presented along with their advantages. Reverse vortex or "tornado" stabilization is used for methane partial oxidation catalysis. For applications where gas velocity is low or gas is stationary, plasma disc can be employed. Analysis of experimental results and comparison with nonplasma system is done to establish clear advantage of intermediate plasma catalysis for the partial oxidation process. View full abstract»

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  • Plasmochemical degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in a capillary discharge plasma Reactor

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report the results of parametric and kinetic studies of the plasmochemical degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in respirable atmospheres using a nonthermal ambient-pressure plasma generated in a pin-to-plate capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharge reactor. Parameters studied included the reactor volume, contaminant residence time, energy density, and influent contaminant concentration. A kinetic model was developed based on a plug-flow regime and a second-order kinetic expression with respect to the reactive plasma species and contaminant concentration. Experimental data were fitted to the proposed model using nonlinear regression techniques, and plasmochemical degradation rate constants were determined for toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene as model compounds. View full abstract»

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  • Comparison of catalytic activity of aluminum oxide and silica gel for decomposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a plasmacatalytic Reactor

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 50 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    By reducing the distance between the dielectric end-fittings of a coaxial pulsed corona reactor to values on the order of millimeters, the efficiency of volatile organic compound (VOC) decontamination of atmospheric pressure air could be increased by a factor of seven over that obtained in reactors with electrode lengths in the centimeter range. The increased efficiency is attributed to the increasing effect of surface streamers with increased electron density compared to streamers in the gas space. Packing the discharge gap of the reactor with catalytically active silica gel pellets further increased the energy efficiency of VOCs decontamination by more than 50% over that obtained in the absence of any packing. Silica gel was shown to remove VOC by adsorption until it became saturated. The adsorption provides a tool for handling surplus VOCs under fluctuating input conditions. Destruction of preadsorbed organics on silica gel was also demonstrated. Aluminum oxide pellets showed no catalytic effect on destruction of VOCs under these conditions. View full abstract»

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  • Structure and dynamics of dust in streaming plasma: dust molecules, strings, and Crystals

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 57 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    In a plasma with ions streaming at a uniform velocity ∼cs, dust grains can be accurately modeled as particles interacting via the dynamically-screened Coulomb interaction, calculated from linear response theory for the plasma. This force is nonreciprocal, i.e., action does not equal reaction, which has remarkable dynamical consequences. We show that up to four grains can form a stable self-bound molecule, which propels itself upstream against the ion flow. Stable equilibria are also found for pairs of grains confined in harmonic or quartic external potentials. For two grains in an anharmonic potential, or for three or more grains in any potential, there is no conserved quantity and self-excited oscillations can occur. In general, there are multiple equilibria, hysteresis occurs as parameters are varied, and it is not possible to distinguish ground and excited states. We show how the organizational and dynamical principles that govern the behavior of few-grain and low-dimensional systems also elucidate the more complex dynamics of crystals. View full abstract»

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  • NIF neutron bang time detector prototype test on OMEGA

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 70 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The time interval between the beginning of the laser pulse and the peak of neutron emission (bang time) is an important characteristic of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions, directly comparable to numerical simulation. For this reason, neutron bang time (NBT) detectors have been successfully operated on ICF facilities such as the Nova and OMEGA lasers, and have been proposed as a core diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Prototypes of the NBT detector suitable for the NIF have been built and tested on the 60-beam OMEGA laser system. These prototypes have three channels. The first, most-sensitive channel consists of a fast plastic scintillator coupled with a microchannel-plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT). The second and third channels are based on a synthetic polycrystalline diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These three independent channels will be able to cover a wide range of DD and DT neutron yields: from 1×109 to 1×1016. The signals from the NBT prototype channels are recorded on a fast digital oscilloscope. Absolute timing was accomplished using the OMEGA optical fiducial system. The NIF NBT prototypes show better than 100-ps timing accuracy, satisfying the NIF specification. View full abstract»

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  • Theory of X-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 77 - 84
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    For the diagnostics of dense plasmas, photons in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) or X-ray domain are required. First experiments have demonstrated the great capacity of X-ray Thomson scattering for the determination of plasma parameters such as density, temperature, and ionization state. For a reliable interpretation of the experimental data, the interaction of energetic photons with the plasma has to be considered. The cross section for Thomson scattering is related to the dynamic structure factor S(k,ω). We improve the usual random phase approximation by including collisions and calculate a dynamic collision frequency in Born approximation. We also study the influence of dynamic screening and the relation to the concept of dynamic local-field corrections to the dielectric function. We give results for a variety of plasma parameters and determine the region where collisions are of relevance. View full abstract»

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  • Technology development for a mm-wave sheet-beam traveling-wave tube

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 85 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (3)
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    A sheet-beam traveling-wave amplifier has been proposed as a high-power generator of radio frequency (RF) from 95 to 300 GHz, using a microfabricated RF slow-wave structure (Carlsten, 2002). The planar geometry of microfabrication technologies matches well with the nearly planar geometry of a sheet beam, and the greater allowable beam current leads to high-peak power, high-average power, and wide bandwidths. Simulations of nominal designs using a vane-loaded waveguide as the slow-wave structure have indicated gains in excess of 1 dB/mm, with extraction efficiencies greater than 20% at 95 GHz with a 120-kV, 20-A electron beam. We have identified stable sheet beam formation and transport as the key enabling technology for this type of device. Also, due to the high aspect ratio in the slow-wave structure, the RF coupling is complicated and requires multiple input and output couplers. The RF mode must be transversely flat over the width of the electron beam, which impacts both the vane design and the input and output coupling. We report on new insights on stable sheet-beam transport and RF mode control in the slow-wave structure. View full abstract»

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  • Magnetic priming effects on noise, startup, and mode competition in magnetrons

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 94 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (944 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Azimuthally varying axial magnetic fields have been utilized to perform "magnetic priming" of magnetrons for rapid startup, low noise, and mode control. An overview of the latest magnetic priming experimental and simulation results are presented in this paper. Magnetic priming experiments in dc-operating microwave oven magnetrons show sideband elimination, even with the cathode heater turned off. Simulations using three three-dimensional (3-D) improved concurrent electromagnetic particle-in-cell (ICEPIC) codes with two different computational algorithms recover the oven magnetron experimental results obtained with magnetic priming including fast mode growth, rapid spoke formation, and the tendency toward lower noise operation. A new, axially symmetric, azimuthally varying magnetic field geometry for oven magnetrons is explored and preliminary results are reported. Simulations using two-dimensional (2-D) MAGIC code for the University of Michigan/Titan relativistic magnetron show that the oscillation startup time can be dramatically decreased (almost by a factor of 3) and mode competition can be suppressed with magnetic priming. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 103 - 104
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Plasma Sciences focuses on plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology.

 

 

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Editor-in-Chief
Steven J. Gitomer, Ph.D.
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Guest Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
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