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Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Dec. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Celebrating the 100th anniversary of controlled, sustained, and powered air flight

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 12 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (613 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper recognizes the 100th anniversary of the 17 December 1903 flight of the Wright brothers. This accomplishment demonstrated the first truly controlled, sustained, powered and heavier-than-air flight. This paper highlights the four special technical challenges the Wright brothers faced and how they were able to develop a flight system that could be safely utilized by humans. The paper also shows the three major contributions of the Wright brothers. Eventually, their work affected travel as well as shipping, farming, warfare, and many aspects of our daily lives. View full abstract»

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  • A developer's perspective of a decision support system

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 40 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (999 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The article discusses the development of a data-centric decision support system (DSS) for process industry applications. DSS is defined as a computer-aided decision environment, positioned at higher levels of the control hierarchy, where the complexity of a task or the importance of a decision calls for human supervision. The data-centric DSS was developed when none of the traditional forecasting and optimization approaches were applicable to a municipal district heating system. The designated R&D team adopted a hybrid approach in which a multiple regression model was applied to a subset of past data points. The idea of data-centric forecasting involves viewing historical data records as points in the associated data hypercube. For any query point, defined by specific values of the predictor variables, a set of similar data points in the neighborhood are retrieved and fit with a statistical model. The model is used to calculate the forecast of the response variable and then the local model is discarded. The idea of data-centric optimization involves viewing the historical data as points in the associated data hypercube. Starting at the current state of the process, a set of actions is evaluated in a relevant neighborhood of the current state. New actions are searched for in the vicinity of the past best practices while attempting to improve the objective function. The paper continues with issues relating to the selection of a suitable technology, the transfer of knowledge from the development team to a business unit, and the practical aspects of DSS application that add to the cost of operation are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Control and systems concepts in the innovation process

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 21 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (495 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The article states that industrial innovation is the study, analysis and design of interacting dynamical processes and that control system methods can be employed to understand and facilitate innovation at three levels. These three levels are the forms of knowledge required to fully master all the aspects of economic needs, science and technology needs, and management and organization needs. These are: knowledge of the social and economic conditions for innovation, knowledge of the organization and facilitation processes in innovating teams, and knowledge of the scientific content of a technical development program. Viewed in this light, control is a true systems technology that has utility far beyond the conventional framework of linear feedback control. The article promotes control systems as a mathematically based overarching systems technology in the hope of repositioning control in a new and rich area of technology. The author recommends the enhancement of the control R&D profession starting with the revision of school curricula, demanding a broader research vision on the part of control professors, and goes further in challenging the practicing control professional. View full abstract»

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  • Reminiscences of automatic control education at the University of Washington

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 17 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (246 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper accounts for the vast experiences of Robert N. Clark in the field of automatic control. Clark received BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan and a PhD degree from Stanford University. He was a research engineer with Honeywell for six years and has been a professor of electrical engineering and of aeronautics and astronautics at the University of Washington. He also authored two textbooks on automatic control, Introduction to Automatic Control Systems (Wiley, 1962) and Control System Dynamics (Cambridge University Press 1996). View full abstract»

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  • Cockle formation in coated magazine paper production

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 59 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1143 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this work, a two level hierarchical approach was proposed and used to analyze cockle phenomena found in the paper manufacturing process. The hierarchy is general for process that produces 3D data sets. The first level performs as a 3D decomposition (Tucker3) while the second level employs a 2D analysis (PLS) of the loadings supplied by the first level. The analysis showed that the important sections of the paper machine that contributed to cockle were Kraft refiners, etc. These are the locations that are expected to contribute to cockle from process knowledge. A calibration model was then developed. The predictive nature of the model was shown to be satisfactory to predict cockle index for reel data that were not a part of the calibration data. Online monitoring and detection applications are possible with this two-level hierarchical structure. It is necessary to use PARAFAC to detect when to recalibrate because the core is unique and every new decomposition is similar to a projection onto the same core. With respect to the use of two-level hierarchical approach to similar processes, such as fiber spinning or continuous casting. It is believed that the two-level hierarchy may be used successfully, at least for diagnosis. However, it should be carefully assessed if the assumptions made in the present case hold in other cases. Additional research is needed to confirm the two-level hierarchy for other processes. View full abstract»

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  • The integration of business and production processes

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 50 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (751 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To meet the demands of short delivery times and custom-designed products, some companies have redesigned their administrative and automation systems to enhance flexibility and enable rapid response. A central part of the redesign process is the integration of the business and production systems, which have traditionally been weakly coupled. However, business and engineering cultures are quite different in the sense that business systems are transaction based and operate primarily on aggregated values in non-real time, while automation systems are event based, operating on engineering process data that are collected, and responded to in real time. Nevertheless, the integration of the business and manufacturing systems can be profitably viewed as a large-scale distributed dynamical control system, in which there is a strong mix of process automation and human operator feedback. To illustrate the benefits of business and manufacturing system integration, the author's experiences over six years with the information technology and automation systems at DanSteel A/S are related. By placing a control engineering team in charge of revamping an enterprise-wide automation and information system, the difficulties encountered were analyzed and solved by taking a control systems overview of the problem. The automation team's interdisciplinary background was a key advantage since it allowed them to model the system concerned, simulate various scenarios and suggest solutions. The result has been specific improvements at DanSteel, including a better understanding of the overall enterprise and knowledge of the benefits of an innovative control view of manufacturing. View full abstract»

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  • Innovation drivers for electric power-assisted steering

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 30 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1000 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The article is concerned with the analysis, design, and implementation of an electric power-assisted steering (EPAS) system for passenger cars. Key components of the EPAS system include a torque sensor, electric motor, electronic control unit, and control and diagnostic algorithms implemented in software. The heart of a typical EPAS system consists of a three-phase motor and its associated power electronics drive circuitry. The main functional blocks of the electrical drive system are the vehicle power supply (battery and harness), a filter circuit, a three-phase inverter bridge, and the motor windings. The single-unit integrated design of EPAS can be packaged on the steering column, steering rack, or pinion. The technical and commercial benefits of EPAS are compared with existing technologies. Detailed examples that link control and systems analysis to innovative areas of the design is also focused upon. View full abstract»

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  • Interview - Introducing the new CSS president

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 69 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (306 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
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  • People in control - Like father, like son

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 72 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (242 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Officer's communique - Minutes of the IEEE control systems society board of governors meeting

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 74 - 79
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Conference report - Denver hosts ACC 2003

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 80 - 87
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Advanced Control Unleashed: Plant Performance Management for Optimum Benefit [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 88 - 89
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (231 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author Index

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 95 - 96
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 96 - 101
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Control Systems Magazine is the largest circulation technical periodical worldwide devoted to all aspects of control systems.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jonathan P. How
jhow@mit.edu