Volume 40 Issue 4 • April 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Mission impossible? [FBI computer network]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):26 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (507 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    With a new computer network automated investigative tools, and more channels for sharing information, the FBI hopes to finally know what it knows. The fall of 2001 saw the start of an ambitious program of modernization, which seems to recognize that the barriers that prevent the FBI from analyzing and sharing data are as much cultural as technological. These include accelerating a bureau-wide over... View full abstract»

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  • Listening in [electronic spying]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):32 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1059 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The author addresses the following question: are the glory days of electronic spying over-or just beginning? Rather than the creation of ever more sensitive receivers or code-breaking computers, the hot areas of cloak-and-dagger information gathering include tapping fiber-optic cables (even at the bottom of the sea); using tiny bugging devices and old fashioned bribery, blackmail, and burglary to ... View full abstract»

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  • Getting the message

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):38 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1101 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Much of the sophisticated surveillance equipment that the United States used to win the Cold War is hardly tailored to the "war" on terrorism say intelligence observers both inside and outside the government. The article examine the question of how the intelligence community is going about pursuing its goals. Some idea may be gathered from the projects that DARPA and the National Science Foundatio... View full abstract»

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  • Treasured texts

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):44 - 49
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (996 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Scattered among the many fine texts that have been written over the past 140 years are the truly great ones-those that have endured for many generations of students, challenged them to solve practical problems, and inspired them to extend the field. In this article, 13 of these texts are described. Nine more will be covered in a future issue of IEEE Spectrum. While only a small subjective sample o... View full abstract»

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  • Secret enough for you?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s): 9
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  • Security and sanity

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):13 - 14
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  • Who will get China's 3G dowry?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):16 - 18
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The situation in China mainly boils down to a contest between two versions of code division multiple access (CDMA). One is Europe's wideband CDMA (WCDMA), which was designed to be as compatible as possible with Europe's hugely successful second-generation Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM). The other, CDMA2000, is preferred by US manufacturers like Motorola Inc. and Lucent Technologies, ... View full abstract»

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  • Key research journals embrace self-censorship

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s): 17
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  • Share and share not

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):19 - 21
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  • Who's politically biased?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):20 - 21
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  • Technical win for Rambus in patents case

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):22 - 24
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  • Hacking matter: Levitating chairs, quantum mirages and the infinite weirdness of programmable atoms [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):50 - 51
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Why are so many patents pending?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):52 - 54
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (227 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This article describes the work of the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) and how a patent aplication is dealt with. Currently, it takes approximately 35 days for a patent application to get out of what's known as the pre-examination process and into the dreaded backlog, now up to more than 400000 applications and counting. The big question facing the PTO today is how, given the system in place,... View full abstract»

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  • Broadband and the baby bells

    Publication Year: 2003
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (179 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Wireless access may be the way to get around the phone and cable monopolies. New rules adopted by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in February may: (A) Reboot the stalled U.S. telecommunications industry by spurring the construction of broadband digital subscriber line (DSL) and fiber telephone networks. (B) Kill any chance of a competitive DSL market in the United States, prolongi... View full abstract»

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  • Engineering cloud nine [atmospheric instruments]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):60 - 61
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (205 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This article describes the career of Tommy Thompson who builds instruments that let atmospheric scientists dissect the weather. His early interest in building crystal radio sets and telephone systems is described. His current work on the cloud research program in Florida is also described. View full abstract»

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  • The internet ecology

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s): 68
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