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Product Engineering and Production, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date January 1963

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Control of Airborne Particulate Contamination

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 1 - 5
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  • Packaging Design Considerations Using Conventional Components

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 24 - 27
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  • Assured Reliability in Soldered Connections: Solderability as Parameter of Assurance

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 28 - 33
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    The reliability of any connecting process is statistically governed by the number of process parameters. Significantly, for reliable welding a multiplicity of parameters requires close control, but reliable soldering depends primarily upon one - solderability of the surfaces to be joined. The theoretical and practical implications of solderability and tests for its evaluation are discussed. An entirely new test is described which is rapid, simple, and significantly correlated with connection quality. The test is based upon an estimate of the contact angle between a molten solder preform and the metal surface. This concept is also linked theoretically with the surface tension-interfacial tension relationship controlling "wetting". This test has been used extensively in the evaluation of component lead wires and in measures to raise their solderability to the highest possible level, with remarkable effects upon connection quality. Formation of perfect fillets having mechanical and electrical redundancy becomes automatic, independent from the human element and little affected by variations of solder, flux, or procedure. Nonaggressive fluxes, and, in some cases, flux-less processes may be used. Highly reliable connections are obtainable with very low-melting and very highmelting solder alloys. Thus, controlled high solderability conveys to solder processes a reliability aspect which is unique and, in some respects, unsurpassed in other connecting processes. View full abstract»

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  • Maintainability Simulation and Demonstration Equipment Description and Application

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 6 - 12
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    This paper describes the rationale, design concepts and mechanization of a versatile electronic simulation and demonstration device to support maintainability programs and projects in which Philco Western Development Laboratories is currently engaged under Air Force specification MIL-M-26512B, "Maintainability Requirements for Aerospace Systems and Equipment". Specific system maintainability design applications include those aspects of equipment and personnel subsystem design required to enhance malfunction detection, diagnosis, isolation and correction. The device consists of a six foot relay rack and an associated remote control unit which contain a Prime System Simulator and interrelated Maintenance System. The former is programmed to represent an operating data flow configuration at the block diagram level of a system or subsystem for which a maintenance system is to be designed. The latter provides a pool of possible man machine combinations for maintaining the simulated "prime" equipment. View full abstract»

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  • Techniques, Equipment and Procedures for Production Welding of Electronics

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 13 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    During the past five years we have seen a substantial upsurge in welding as a technique for fabrication of electronics. The term "welding" has been applied to a variety of techniques, each with its special applications and special equipment. This paper describes the many different types of welding and production equipment available, and discusses the special procedures required. These points are paramount: First, no one technique is universally applicable to system assembly and cordwood module fabrication, as well as to deposited film and integrated circuit manufacture. Secondly, though we do not have universal equipment, we do have universal problems. To be really successful with any technique, we must establish rigid control of materials, exhaustive engineering analysis of the weld schedule or setup, and strict maintenance of standards for machine and operator qualification and certi- fication. View full abstract»

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  • Design of a Digital Telemetry Unit using Dot Components

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    It has long been apparent that uniformity of the body geometry and of the lead geometry and material of electronic parts is highly desirable. Dot or pellet component parts provide such uniformity to a high degree and thus lend themselves to the design of equipment of considerable sophistication. To demonstrate the technique a digital telemetry unit, previously packaged in the form of welded cordwood modules, was designed using dot components. The unit consists of some 1200 parts disposed on six card-shaped modules measuring 3" x 6.7" x 0.03". Modules are made of molded epoxy and are color coded for assembly and trouble shooting purposes. Silkscreened conductive adhesive is used for intraconnections. All interconnections (i.e. external to modules) are brought out along one edge of the module in the form of flexible, multistranded wires. These wires are permanently soldered, book fashion, to an interconnection matrix consisting of an array of welded tubes. By treating the modules as pages in a book, all parts are accessible for inspection or replacement without disconnecting any section of the circuit. Foil-clad balsa wood spacers are provided for separation between adjacent modules. The modules and spacers are stacked and compressed by means of two rigid end plates and two screws, thus providing a compact, prestressed structure virtually immune to shock and vibration. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1965. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope