By Topic

Parts, Materials and Packaging, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date September 1965

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (68 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Who's Who in G-PMP: Arthur P. Kramer

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (149 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Solar Cell-A Novel Transducer

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 23 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB)  

    The solar cell has been used extensively only as a source of electric power in space vehicles, and as an indicator of static light intensity in the familiar photographer's exposure meter. Its development was prompted by a need for a reliable, long-life source of power in these applications. A novel extension of its properties is feasible in sensing and measuring mechanical movements. The solar cell becomes a novel transducer, permitting the measurement of displacements in confined spaces which are either too small or too rapid for visual observation. It can be used wherever it can be mounted with a suitable light source. Since displacement is a measure of a distance traversed in a time interval, calibration of the measuring system using the solar cell transducer allows measurements of time, velocity, and acceleration. From these results, an analysis of the dynamic behavior of the mechanical system can be obtained. This paper discusses the general objectives of a sensor transducer, to show that the solar cell is a feasible addition to the many types presently available. Typical characteristic properties of the solar cell are discussed to illustrate its behavior as. a transducer. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multistate Semiconductors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 50 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • P-N Junction Electroluminescence and Diode Lasers

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 40 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1672 KB)  

    Junction diodes made from certain types of semiconductors emit light efficiently when forward biased. Wavelengths between 8.5 µ and 0.64 µ have been observed, depending on the material. When the diode has cleaved facets normal to the junction, a resonant optical cavity is formed in the plane of the junction and. stimulated emission can be observed. The threshold current density for stimulated emission in GaAs is of the order of 1000 A/cm2at 77°K and increases as T8. The efficiency is of the order of 10 percent. For GaAs, electroluminescent emission occurs at about 8500 Â at 77°K, and the spontaneous linewidth is 200 Â. Above threshold sharp lines appear, the spacing of which is correctly predicted by cavity theory. The width of an individual mode line in GaAs is, at most, 10 Mc/s. A fan-shaped laser beam emerges from a Fabry-Perot cavity above threshold; the plane of the fan is normal to the junction and the dimensions are about 2° by 6°. Simulated emission occurs from filaments in the junction plane; the cross section is about 6 µ by 25 µ. Diode laser emission can be modulated simply by modulating the current. The stimulated optical decay time is at most 0.2 µs. Diodes have been made to amplify light, and various cooperative and quenching effects have been observed in optically-coupled chips. These effects suggest the use of diode lasers as computer elements. In general, diode lasers will find use as intense point light sources. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Design of Segmental Function Generators Based on Silicon Carbide Nonlinear Resistors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 48 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Design Formulas for Nonreactive High-Voltage Pulse Resistors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 3 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2560 KB)  

    To terminate pulse equipment supplying peak voltages up to a million volts for microsecond durations requires nonreactive loads to maintain the pulse characteristics. The resistive elements must not only dissipate the pulse energy but must also maintain a low reactance for the high frequencies in the pulse waveform. The return circuit, treated as a short-circuited transmission line, forms the basis for designing nonreactive resistors with both cylindrical and fiat conductors. The distribution of voltage, current, and power is shown for the ideal design. Formulas are derived for the Chaperon double winding, the "hairpin" or loop geometry, and the coaxial form. Resistance values range from less than an ohm to several hundred thousand ohms for pulse voltages up to 1.2 million volts. Time constants vary from 10-6to 10-10seconds. A frequency expression is derived to aid in predicting the resistor's frequency response. Construction and measuring techniques are included. Frequency effects are analyzed to compensate for the skin effect on the resistance and inductance, and to select low-loss dielectric materials. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using an Optical Comparator as a High Resolution Reduction Camera

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 35 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB)  

    This paper discusses a method of modifying certain optical comparators so that they may be used as both comparator and high resolution camera. The modifications are uncomplicated and inexpensive. They consist primarily of providing a new light source and a means to hold the photographic plates or film. Since the lenses of the comparator serve as the lenses of the camera, no lens modifications are needed. The system discussed has five discrete reduction capabilities ranging from 10X to 500X. Optical resolution in excess of 500 lines per millimeter has been obtained. A camera system of this type, when compared to the camera ordinarily used for integrated circuit work, has reduced flexibility in certain areas. As an example, one of these areas is the upper limit of the master size. However, in most instances, these limitations can be minimized or circumvented as described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Chemistry of Failure of Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 28 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB)  

    Common failure modes of aluminum electrolytic capacitors are due to chemical reactions between electrodes and electrolyte. From capacitance and weight change data and electron micrographs it is proposed that the attack of anode foil is primarily dissolution of oxide dielectric; that of cathode foil involves metal dissolution with hydrogen evolution. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1971. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope