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Automatic Control, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1960

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 0
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  • Originality and importance of technical papers

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 77
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  • The issue in brief

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 78
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 0
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  • Specification of the linear feedback system sensitivity function

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 85 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
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    This paper examines the problem of designing a linear feedback system so that its response to a specified input is relatively insensitive to slow changes in system parameters. Classical feedback design techniques involve the specification of the system sensitivity function on the basis only of the forced response to a given input. A new performance criterion has been derived, in which the mean square variation of the system response is minimized. This specification of the sensitivity function results in control over the variation of both the characteristic and forced responses with system changes. The approach is based upon the assumption of a differential change in the variable system parameter, but yields workable results for large changes. It employs mathematical techniques which have been well developed for other applications in network design. The stability problem associated with high loop gains is considerably reduced when the sensitivity function is specified on the basis of this criterion. View full abstract»

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  • Statistical evaluation of digital-analog systems for finite operating time

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 118 - 128
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    A frequency-domain mathematical model for comparing the performance of a linear sampled-data channel to a linear continuous channel is developed. The model assumes a suddenly applied stationary random input (input identically zero before the local time origin). The model allows an explicit algebraic definition of ensemble mean-squared error, after a finite operating time, by application of residue theory. The ideal or comparison channel need not be realizable. The quasi-stationary characteristics of the excitation are accounted for by including a starting switch as a variable parameter within the appropriate system weighting functions. The technique developed in this paper is utilized to evaluate the ensemble mean-squared error due to processing a vehicle velocity estimate (as might be supplied by an integrating accelerometer) in a digital computer. The velocity estimate is used to calculate a numerical value of present vehicle position. This problem is of fundamental importance in present-day pure inertial, pure Doppler, or inertial-Doppler navigation systems. The effect of quantization, inherent in the process of analog-to-digital conversion, may be included in this evaluation. It is shown that for cases where system inputs can be approximated by narrow-band, first-order, Markoff-type power spectra, the practical engineering use of the simplest digital integration program (rectangular) or the simplest hold (box-car) is well justified. The examples illustrate the mathematical techniques necessary to compute the ensemble mean-squared error, and illustrate how several simplifying assumptions may be used. View full abstract»

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  • A note on third-order linear systems

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 151
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  • A mathematical representation of hydraulic servomechanisms

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 129 - 135
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    This paper gives a basic representation of a high performance hydraulic servo actuator. The discussion gives a means of calculating the servo gain and rate limit characteristics as functions of the design parameters. Assumptions are discussed that would allow simplification of the equations for their application with computing equipment. Representation of the supply accumulator and pump is included. The effects of equipment nonlinearities can be incorporated into the basic model with appropriate modification of the computer program. The work of this paper has been applied to the design and analysis of missile flight control systems where the rate limit characteristic of the actuator is significant to dynamic performance. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic control of three-dimensional vector quantities--Part 3

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 106 - 117
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This is the final part of a three-part paper on the application of vector techniques to automatic control systems whose input, output, and disturbance quantities may be characterized by three-dimensional vectors. In Parts 1 and 2, position and angular velocity vectors were introduced to demonstrate the solution of coordinate conversion and geometric stabilization problems, respectively. In brief, the subject of Part 3 is Newton's Second Law, with the application of the previously defined vector algebra to problems in kinetics. In particular, the behavior of "Newtonian sensors" such as gyroscopes and accelerometers is considered in detail, in order to develop the basic equations which describe the dynamic performance of these devices, determine the errors associated with their usage, and demonstrate the application of the vector algebra to more complex systems. View full abstract»

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  • Improved transient response in servo systems with input modifications

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 152 - 153
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Adaptive and optimalizing control systems

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 148 - 151
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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  • Soviet literature on control systems

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 142 - 147
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    Most of the better known articles from Soviet literature on the subject of control systems published between January, 1953 and March, 1959 are cited. Emphasis is on the theoretical aspects of control systems. The items are arranged alphabetically according to author, with no attempt at classification. The first section includes all topics and the second section lists only articles which have English translations. Annotations are given only for articles which the bibliographer has examined. The introduction mentions some of the existing bibliographies in the field and discusses possible schemes for classifying bibliographic references to control systems. View full abstract»

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  • A general method for deriving the describing functions for a certain class of nonlinearities

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 135 - 141
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
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    Since Goldfarb's original work on describing functions, a considerable number of papers have been published in which the describing functions of particular nonlinearities have been derived. It appears however that little effort has been made to classify the nonlinearities. Since the describing function method is one of the more powerful methods available at present to analyze nonlinear feedback systems, it appears desirable to collect the expressions for the describing functions of a few different types of nonlinearities in one paper. It is the purpose of this paper to derive the describing functions of two general types of nonlinearities and show how the describing functions of many other practical types of nonlinearities for which the describing function analysis is valid naturally follow. View full abstract»

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  • Accuracy requirements of nonlinear compensation for backlash

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 79 - 85
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    Recent advances in the analysis of nonlinear control systems have given rise to a more logical and systematic approach to the elimination of the detrimental effects of inherent nonlinearities. The describing function technique is used in this paper to analyze two typical servos. The servos are shown to exhibit a stable limit cycle and are stabilized by linear and nonlinear techniques. The nonlinear technique involves the insertion of an additional nonlinear feedback element which feeds back a distorted signal opposite in phase to the original distorted feedback signal. In particular, a method is developed in this paper for determining the accuracy required in the construction of a practical nonlinear compensating element. View full abstract»

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  • Synthesis of linear, multivariable feedback control systems

    Publication Year: 1960 , Page(s): 94 - 105
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    A multivariable controlled process or plant is one in which there are n independent inputs and m outputs with n > 1 and m \leq n . A control problem may exist for one or two principal reasons. 1) The plant parameters may vary or they may be only vaguely known, and the system response sensitivity to the parameter variation is to be reduced. 2) The system response to disturbances is to be reduced. A synthesis procedure for attaining these objectives and simultaneously realizing a desired set of system transmission functions is developed in this paper. The role of system configuration is considered. Design is broken up into two separate regions. In the significant system-response frequency region, there is straightforward synthesis in attaining the design objectives. In the higher frequency range, the loop transmission must be shaped so that the system is stable. The latter problem is considerably more difficult when there are substantial plant parameter variations. Some procedures are illustrated by two detailed examples ( n=m=2 in one example, and n=3, m =2 in the second) in which there are large plant parameter variations. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The latest title for this publication is IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control.

 

This Transactions ceased publication in 1958. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control.

Full Aims & Scope