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Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date January 1977

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 0
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  • Guest Editorial: Computer Communications--An Emerging Discipline

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 1
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  • Editor's Note

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 178
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  • Queueing Systems, Volume I: Theory - Leonard Kleinrock

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 178 - 179
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Queueing Systems, Volume II: Computer Applications - Leonard Kleinrock

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 180
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  • Communication Networks for Computers - D.W. Davies and D.L. Barber [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 180 - 181
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  • Computer-Communication Networks - Norman Abramson and Franklin F. Kuo, Eds

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 182 - 183
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  • Computer Communications - Paul E. Green, Jr. and Robert W. Lucky, Eds

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 183 - 184
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  • Advances in Computer Communications - W.W. Chu, Ed

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 184
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 0
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  • Computer Communication Via Satellites--A Queueing Model

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 140 - 147
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The last few years have witnessed the intensive growth of computer communication networks. The need for nationwide and multination computer communication systems brought about the development of packet-switching networks such as the ARPANET. In this paper we examine a model for computer-to-computer communication via a satellite link. In each network, a single node, the satellite communication concentrator (SCC), manages the flow of information between the terminals in the network and the satellite link. The SCC buffers messages from the terminals and retransmits them over the satellite channel. Buffer space claimed by a message is made free only after the SCC receives an acknowledgment from the receiving network; transmission errors cause the buffer to retransmit the message. The statistical behavior of such a system is considered. View full abstract»

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  • Throughput in the ARPANET--Protocols and Measurement

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 95 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
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    The speed at which large files can travel across a computer network is an important performance measure of that network. In this paper we examine the achievable sustained throughput in the ARPANET. Our point of departure is to describe the procedures used for controlling the flow of long messages (multipacket messages) and to identify the limitations that these procedures place on the throughput. We then present the quantitative results of experiments which measured the maximum throughput as a function of topological distance in the ARPANET. We observed a throughput of approximately 38 kbit/s at short distances. This throughput falls off at longer distances in a fashion which depends upon which particular version of the flow control procedure is in use; for example, at a distance of 9 hops, an October 1974 measurement gave 30 kbit/s, whereas a May 1975 experiment gave 27 kbit/s. The two different flow control procedures for these experiments are described, and the sources of throughput degradation at longer distances are identified, a major cause being due to a poor movement of critical limiting resources around in the network (this we call "phasing"). We conclude that flow control is a tricky business, but in spite of this, the ARPANET throughput is respectably high. View full abstract»

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  • A Minimum Delay Routing Algorithm Using Distributed Computation

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 73 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (245)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1288 KB)  

    An algorithm is defined for establishing routing tables in the individual nodes of a data network. The routing table at a node i specifies, for each other node j , what fraction of the traffic destined for node j should leave node i on each of the links emanating from node i . The algorithm is applied independently at each node and successively updates the routing table at that node based on information communicated between adjacent nodes about the marginal delay to each destination. For stationary input traffic statistics, the average delay per message through the network converges, with successive updates of the routing tables, to the minimum average delay over all routing assignments. The algorithm has the additional property that the traffic to each destination is guaranteed to be loop free at each iteration of the algorithm. In addition, a new global convergence theorem for noncontinuous iteration algorithms is developed. View full abstract»

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  • The Modeling of Adaptive Routing in Data-Communication Networks

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 85 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (61)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB)  

    Basic analytical models for problems of dynamic and quasi-static routing in data-communication networks are introduced. The models are intended to handle the quantities of interest in an algorithmic form, and as such require only a minimal number of assumptions. Control and estimation methods are used to construct algorithms for the solution of the routing problem. View full abstract»

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  • A Bound and Approximation of Delay Distribution for Fixed-Length Packets in an Unslotted ALOHA Channel and a Comparison with Time Division Multiplexing (TDM)

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 136 - 139
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB)  

    This paper presents an approximate analysis of a pure unslotted ALOHA random access with fixed-length packets and computes percentiles of delay for various throughputs. It introduces the concept of the burst ratio (mean packet interarrival time/maximum delay) of a source which allows a precise comparison with time division multiplexing (TDM) and indicates when ALOHA is the preferred access technique. The paper presents two curves that should be sufficient for design along with a simple computational procedure. Results are verified and augmented using simulation. View full abstract»

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  • The Throughput of Packet Broadcasting Channels

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 117 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (284)  |  Patents (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB)  

    Packet broadcasting is a form of data communications architecture which can combine the features of packet switching with those of broadcast channels for data communication networks. Much of the basic theory of packet broadcasting has been presented as a byproduct in a sequence of papers with a distinctly practical emphasis. In this paper we provide a unified presentation of packet broadcasting theory. In Section II we introduce the theory of packet broadcasting data networks. In Section III we provide some theoretical results dealing with the performance of a packet broadcasting network when the users of the network have a variety of data rates. In Section IV we deal with packet broadcasting networks distributed in space, and in Section V we derive some properties of power-limited packet broadcasting channels, showing that the throughput of such channels can approach that of equivalent point-to-point channels. View full abstract»

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  • Large-Scale Network Topological Optimization

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 29 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (60)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2008 KB)  

    A cost-effective structure for a large network is a multilevel hierarchy consisting of a backbone network and a family of local access networks. The backbone network is generally a distributed network, while the local access networks are typically centralized systems. In special cases, the network may consist primarily of either centralized or distributed portions. This paper discusses topological design problems for such systems, including the concentrator location problem, the terminal assignment problem, the terminal layout problem (the constrained minimum spanning tree problem), the distributed network topological layout problem, and the backbone node location problem. Recent algorithm research, including exact and heuristic problem solutions, are described and computational experience is given. Finally, open problems in large-scale topological design are reported. View full abstract»

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  • Network Design: An Algorithm for the Access Facility Location Problem

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 61 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
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    In any network where a large number of widely dispersed "users" share a limited number of "resources," the strategy for access will play a large part in determining the cost and performance of the network. In this paper we consider a topological design aspect of the access problem. In particular, we consider the problem of locating "access facilities," or concentration points, to obtain an economic connection of users to resources. The problem is formulated as the locating of generic access facilities (GAF's) to obtain an economic connection of nodes (users) to a resource connection point (RESCOP). The nodes may be connected through multipoint lines, but with a constraint on the number of nodes which may share a single line. The GAF's are constrained in capacity, expressed as the number of nodes they can support, and have a cost associated with them. The basic solution technique presented is a heuristic algorithm characterized by the following four steps. 1) Simplify the problem to a point-to-point problem by replacing clusters of nodes by single "center-of-mass" (COM) nodes. 2) Partition the reduced set of COM nodes by applying an Add algorithm, resulting in one of the COM nodes selected as a GAF site. 3) Select one of the original nodes as a real GAF site in each partition by examining the original nodes closest to the COM node selected in the Add algorithm, and selecting the best. 4) Apply a line-layout algorithm to each partition, with its selected GAF site serving as the central node. View full abstract»

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  • Systems Analysis for Data Transmission-J. Martin

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 181 - 182
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  • Queueing Models for Computer Communications System Analysis

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 2 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (66)
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    Modeling and performance prediction are becoming increasingly important issues in the design and operation of computer communications systems. Complexities in their configuration and sophistications in resource sharing found in today's computer communications demand our intensive effort to enhance the modeling capability. The present paper is intended to review the state of affairs of analytic methods, queueing analysis techniques in particular, which are essential to modeling of computer communication systems. First we review basic properties of exponential queueing systems, and then give an overview of recent progress made in the areas of queueing network models and discrete-time queueing systems. A unified treatment of buffer storage overflow problems will be discussed as an application example, in which we call attention to the analogy between buffer behavior and waiting time in the GI/G/1 queue. Another application deals with the analysis of various multiplexing techniques and network configuration. An extensive reference list of the subject fields is also provided. View full abstract»

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  • Network Services in Systems Network Architecture

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 104 - 116
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (2)
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    This paper discusses the services provided by a systems network architecture (SNA) network and design aspects related to these services. Both the basic transmission services and higher level network services are discussed. The first section describes the structure of SNA. The second section describes SNA's transmission services and sketches in the other aspects of SNA's structure. The next section describes services provided to users and managers of the network and the distribution of these services throughout the various nodes of the network. A concluding section discusses several potential extensions. View full abstract»

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  • A Multiaccess Model for Packet Switching with a Satellite Having Some Processing Capability

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 128 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
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    A multiaccess model for packet switching with a satellite having the capability of interrogating the uplink header and creating the downlink header is proposed. The satellite broadcasts slot assignments, based on the users' reported queue status, to the users for transmission in the next frame. With the protocols being done at both the earth stations and at the satellite, the proposed multiaccess model avoids collisions that are prevalent in schemes of the ALOHA type. The actual model is too complex to handle analytically. We derive analytical equations for a two-group model. Calculated and simulated buffer overflow probabilities as a function of traffic intensity and buffer size are compared. We also evaluate the performance of the actual model in terms of average system delay as a function of traffic intensity by means of computer simulation. View full abstract»

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  • An Approximate Method for Design and Analysis of an ALOHA System

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 148 - 157
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB)  

    We develop here an approximate method for the design and performance prediction of a multiaccess communication system which employs the ALOHA packet-switching technique. Our model is based on the use of a diffusion process approximation of an ALOHAlike system (with or without time-slotting). A simple closed-form solution for the variable Q(t) , a variant of the number of backlog messages at time t , is given in terms of a few system and user parameters. Final results are expressed in terms of ordinary performance measures such as throughput and average delay. Several numerical examples are given to demonstrate the usefulness of the approximation technique developed. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal Design of Mixed-Media Packet-Switching Networks: Routing and Capacity Assignment

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 158 - 169
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB)  

    This paper considers a mixed-media packet-switched computer communication network which consists of a low-delay terrestrial store-and-forward subnet combined with a low-cost high-bandwidth satellite subnet. We show how to route traffic via ground and/or satellite links by means of static, deterministic procedures and assign capacities to channels subject to a given linear cost such that the network average delay is minimized. Two operational schemes for this network model are investigated: one is a scheme in which the satellite channel is used as a slotted ALOHA channel; the other is a new multiaccess scheme we propose in which whenever a channel collision occurs, retransmission of the involved packets will route through ground links to their destinations. The performance of both schemes is evaluated and compared in terms of cost and average packet delay tradeoffs for some examples. The results offer guidelines for the design and optimal utilization of mixed-media networks. View full abstract»

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  • On the Topological Design of Distributed Computer Networks

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 48 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (112)  |  Patents (2)
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    The problem of data transmission in a network environment involves the design of a communication subnetwork. Recently, significant progress has been made in this technology, and in this article we survey the modeling, analysis, and design of such computercommunication networks. Most of the design methodology presented has been developed with the packet-switched Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) in mind, although the principles extend to more general networks. We state the general design problem, decompose it into simpler subproblems, discuss the solutions to these subproblems, and then suggest a heuristic topological design procedure as a solution to the original problem. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Communications focuses on all telecommunications including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television by electromagnetic propagation.

 

 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Schober
University of British Columbia