By Topic

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1990

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • DESC efforts for parts quality improvement

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 7 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (346 KB)  

    Some of the impact that the test program at the Defense Electronics Supply Center (DESC) is having on improving the quality of products being supplied to its customers is illustrated. DESC test program non-mil lot rejection rates were nearing 50% for discrete semiconductors tested in receiving inspection. The associated part reject rate was nearly 15%. The part reject rate for all federal supply classes (FSCs) being sampled is less than 1%. Plans to drive the defect rate toward 100 PPM are discussed. Data indicate an increase in the quality of DESC-sampled devices being supplied for the military services over the last few years. The test programs and the sampling and test requirements are described.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A modular 550 watt, 25 watts per cubic inch power supply for next generation aircraft

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 11 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (414 KB)  

    The development of the HVS-550 high-performance power supply is described. The HVS-550 was designed and built utilizing state-of-the-art surface mount construction, low-profile magnetics, and aggressive thermal management techniques. This combination allowed the module height to be only 0.58 in. The unique requirements of the military system that bounded the power-supply parameters are discussed. Cooling is provided either by liquid circulating through the chassis or by conduction through the card edges. The measured power supply efficiency is in excess of 85%, with 11-V output. The output noise spectrum is excellent because of noise-cancelling techniques utilized to achieve the level of performance required by the system.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • AFIT neural network research

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 17 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (219 KB)  

    A brief summary of research done at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) in the area of neural networks is provided. It has been shown that backpropagation, used for feedforward artificial neural networks, is just a degenerate version of an extended Kalman filter, and that networks can do about as well as the optimum statistical classification technique. A method of finding the importance of features for use by a neural network classifier has been determined. Techniques for using neural networks for image segmentation have been developed. In optical pattern recognition, techniques that allow the processing of real FLIR (forward-looking infrared) images with existing binary spatial light modulators have been devised. An optical direction of arrival detector applicable to laser illumination direction determination has been designed and tested; the design is similar to a fly's eye. Coated mirrors for the optical confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer have been designed, specified, fabricated, and installed. Significant progress has been made in the use of neural networks for processing multiple-feature sets for speech recognition.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Advanced Launch System (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 20 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (307 KB)  

    A brief status review of the Advanced Launch System (ALS) is given. The use of electrical actuation integrated with a single-vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionic requirements is highlighted. This technology will help attain the ALS primary goals of reduced costs ($300/lb Earth to LEO (low Earth orbit)) and improved operability by significantly reducing the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. Six candidate government-supported programs that are involved in the relevant technologies or that could have significant applications for electric actuators and an integrated power-distribution and control system are listed with a brief explanation and description of noteworthy technology.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Attitude determination with GPS: experimental results

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 24 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (301 KB)  

    An approach to global positioning system (GPS) attitude determination and the results of an experimental evaluation are presented. The most outstanding features of the method are the fundamental observable used for attitude calculation, the triple difference, and the introduction of a new parameter, the differential dilution of precision (DDOP), which relates the GPS satellite geometry to the GPS accuracy when measuring angular magnitudes. The experiment used two commercial off-the-shelf GPS C/A code receivers delivering integrated Doppler measurements. The algorithm is robust with respect to phase cycle slips and does not require solving the usual integer ambiguity of the measurements. The preliminary results show that absolute attitude determination requires a calibration of the baseline and that the relative attitude accuracy is on the order of 0.1 degrees or 2 mrads for the case of a 2-m-long baseline.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Where does human factors fit in R&D organizations?

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 31 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (234 KB)  

    It is argued that human factors professionals in large R&D organizations should have a centralized human factors group (or department) with a manager sensitive to human factors organizational issues. This arrangement permits these professionals to maximize their contributions to the design, development, and testing of a product or service. Managers of human factors groups and departments can help educated project managers about the value of human factors. Human factors groups, departments, and managers provide benefits to the company by resolving project conflicts concerning user-oriented designs. They help foster a sense of a behavioral sciences community within the R&D organization and aid in recruiting job candidates. They are good for the product or service, the company, and the human factors profession.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 8"×8" full color cockpit display

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 3 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    The operation of active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs), the preferred flat-panel displays for avionic and aerospace applications, is explained. An 8-in.×8-in. full-color AMLCD designed for a military aircraft is described, as well as the principles of the p-i-n diode switch on which its design is based. The performance characteristics of the display are examined View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com