Volume 27 Issue 10 • Oct. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • The expanding world of R&D

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):28 - 33
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    How various countries and companies are attempting to maintain their competitive positions in an increasingly Japanese-dominated climate is examined. The role of government in supporting research, technology, and their applications (which varies widely among countries) is discussed. Unlike the US, other countries gear their roles to helping their citizens gain advantage in the commercial marketpla... View full abstract»

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  • View from the top: responding to the business divisions' needs (R&D)

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):34 - 39
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    The ways in which the various components of corporate R&D have changed in response to escalating worldwide competitiveness, (with basic research remaining more or less untouched) are examined. Some lessons learned by R&D executives about how to be first with the best are noted, and various attempts to streamline corporate R&D are described. These include giving business divisions a gre... View full abstract»

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  • Federal laboratories meet the marketplace

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):39 - 44
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    The changing role of national laboratories in the US is examined. The goal is for the federal laboratories to provide a source of ideas for industry. Past efforts, begun in the 1980s, to revamp the laboratories have moved slowly or mired completely, and it expected that a significant number of them, many in the Department of Defense, may disappear within the next few years, having outlived their m... View full abstract»

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  • Software R&D: from an art to a science

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):44 - 46
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    Changes in software development are discussed, and major trends resulting in development techniques becoming increasingly structured and disciplined and focusing more attention on building a mathematical basis of software engineering are identified. Modification of the classic waterfall model of software development (stopping at certain stages to build prototypes or changing the way the cycle prog... View full abstract»

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  • From monopoly to competition: long-term research is vulnerable

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):46 - 50
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    The question of whether there is any fundamental difference, around the world, between the research and development in government-regulated monopolies and in private companies is addressed by examining three major corporate restructurings in the last decade: the breakup of the Bell System (AT&T Co.) in the United States, and the privatization of the United Kingdom's British Telecommunications ... View full abstract»

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  • Electronics consortia to impact products for generations

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):50 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A growing web of collaborative ventures that has spread throughout electronics R&D establishments in recent years is discussed. The ventures cut across corporate and national boundaries, linking military and civilian organisations, private and public sector concerns, and even corporate rivals that are ordinarily fiercely competitive. The primary reason for the increasing emphasis on collaborat... View full abstract»

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  • Contract research gains adherents for its flexibility and low overhead

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):58 - 60
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    The use of independent contract research organizations by companies anxious to venture into new territory quickly without the overhead of new staff or equipment is discussed. Contract research firms can be found around the world, but most are concentrated in the United States. Many sprang up after World War II as conduits for transferring to industry the technology developed during the war. Most w... View full abstract»

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  • Teamwork plus technology cuts development time

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):61 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    The deleterious effects of not bringing projects quickly from the laboratory to the market are described, and corporate efforts to cut development time are examined. Many Japanese companies have already wrestled with this problem and moved on to other issues, like their need for basic research. As a result, many US corporations are looking to the Japanese for guidance. This is leading companies to... View full abstract»

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  • Encouraging risk-taking, sanctioning failures are helping spur creativity

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):67 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (423 KB)

    Strategies for fostering creativity in a research laboratory are considered. Some novel approaches to providing exposure to new ideas through interaction between researchers are described. The usefulness of chaos in small doses is discussed, and some recipes for brain-storming are examined. The importance of tolerating failures and celebrating successes is stressed.<<ETX>> View full abstract»

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  • Just keeping current entails ingenuity, resourcefulness, and improvisation (R&amp;D)

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):69 - 73
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    Strategies for information gathering that go beyond just reading journals and attending conferences are examined. Among them are the use of electronic mail, visiting other companies, circulating reports within the company, and communicating with marketing departments. The practice of bootlegging time, equipment, and materials to keep a line of research out of the internal information flow, at leas... View full abstract»

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  • Harnessing university research for competitiveness, industry support

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):73 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (558 KB)

    The effects of changes in the industrial R&D climate on research performed at universities in both the East and West are examined. The approaches to using university research for industrial problems taken by SRC, a nonprofit industry consortium based in Research Triangle Park, NC, by the National Science Foundation, and by other university-industry collaborations are described. In Europe, Grea... View full abstract»

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  • Contrasting strategies are pursued by big three economic powerhouses

    Publication Year: 1990, Page(s):76 - 78
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    The approach taken by each of the big three economic powerhouses, Germany, Japan, and the United States, to high-technology development is considered, focusing on the lessons that the US can learn from the other two. Government activities in the US at the state and federal levels are discussed. German research strategies are described in the context of the European Community (EC) and the major mul... View full abstract»

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