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Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Oct 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Mechatronic systems, communication, and control in precision agriculture

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 48 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (32200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Site specific agriculture requires the application of field machinery capable of precise, repeatable operations based on models of systems processes. Such equipment requires a host of high-precision sensors and actuators. In the mechatronic design process outlined, the efficiency of the design process and the performance of the mechanisms can be improved considerably or even be optimized through concurrent, integrated development of the mechanisms, control systems, and advanced information systems. Such advanced sensing systems with modern feedback controllers can generate significant demands for data processing and require substantial communications bandwidth. Standardized agricultural bus systems form the backbone for the high-variability and high-bandwidth data streams. In this article, three example mechatronic designs of mobile agricultural machinery are discussed, and the requisite communication system for these machines is presented View full abstract»

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  • Data-based mechanistic modeling, forecasting, and control

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 14 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4864 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article briefly reviews the main aspects of the generic data based mechanistic (DBM) approach to modeling stochastic dynamic systems and shown how it is being applied to the analysis, forecasting, and control of environmental and agricultural systems. The advantages of this inductive approach to modeling lie in its wide range of applicability. It can be used to model linear, nonstationary, and nonlinear stochastic systems, and its exploitation of recursive estimation means that the modeling results are useful for both online and offline applications. To demonstrate the practical utility of the various methodological tools that underpin the DBM approach, the article also outlines several typical, practical examples in the area of environmental and agricultural systems analysis, where DBM models have formed the basis for simulation model reduction, control system design, and forecasting View full abstract»

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  • Intelligent systems for agriculture in Japan

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 71 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (14568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper presents findings of agriculture research conducted in Japan in three areas: 1) artificial intelligence applications in agriculture and the environments: 2) intelligent environment control for plant production systems; and 3) intelligent robots in agriculture. The latest biosystem derived algorithms are discussed. A finite element inverse technique using a photosynthesis algorithm is described, following by a comparison of neural network (NN) training by the photosynthetic algorithm versus genetic algorithm (GA). Leaf cellular automata are introduced, and their application to optimisation problems is discussed. A decision system consisting of NNs and GAs is applied to the optimisation of plant growth under hydroponics in Japanese plant factories. In this system, the plant growth affected by nutrient concentration is first identified using NNs. Finally, recent developments in intelligent agricultural robots in Japan are introduced View full abstract»

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  • Environmental control for plants on Earth and in space

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 28 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (8008 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Plant production systems have become more sophisticated. Climate control has changed over the past several decades from manual to digital operations, and control computers have become faster and more capable. The paper focuses first on the environment control of plant production in commercial greenhouses and plant growth chambers, and then contrasts that growing system with the needs for rather different control strategies to grow plants in space applications. To demonstrate key characteristics of greenhouse environment control, a nonlinear controller for coupled air temperature and humidity, with various methods of feedback and feedforward control appropriate for this system, is presented View full abstract»

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  • Advances in control of agriculture and the environment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 8 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modern agricultural business is becoming increasingly reliant on computer-based systems, automation, and robotics that are taking over many of the tedious tasks formerly performed by humans, with superior performance in most cases. To manage the increasing complexity of agricultural systems, increasingly sophisticated methodologies are required. This has given rise to the promising field of precision agriculture, where the goal is to improve the efficiency of operation of agricultural enterprises, as well as the duality and consistency of products, by compensating for the vagueness and uncertainty of the environment. Conversely, social demand has created pressure for respectful treatment of the environment and the well-being of humans. These objectives result in new and challenging problems, problems that can only be resolved by applying advanced information and control technologies to production management of processes and farms View full abstract»

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  • Naive control of the double integrator

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 86 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We deal with a form of controller evaluation that may be called naive control. In naive control, a control algorithm derived under nominal (or ideal) conditions is evaluated by analytical or numerical means under off-nominal (or nonideal) conditions that were not assumed in the formal synthesis procedure. Under such nonideal conditions, the controller may or may not perform well. This approach is distinct from robust control, which seeks to accommodate off-nominal perturbations in the synthesis procedure. We consider the double integrator plant, which is one of the most fundamental systems in control applications, representing single degree-of-freedom translational and rotational motion. Applications of the double integrator include low-friction, free rigid-body motion, such as single-axis spacecraft rotation and rotary crane motion. The double integrator plant considered includes a saturation nonlinearity on the control input View full abstract»

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Jonathan P. How
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