By Topic

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date Jul 2001

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Using interchangeable virtual instrument (IVI) drivers to increase test system performance

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 8 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (564 KB)  

    Instrument driver technology has evolved tremendously over the last decade. Initiatives such as SCPI and VXIplug&play have simplified remote instrument programming with standardized command messages and high-level utility functions. The latest initiative is the Interchangeable Virtual Instrument (IVI) Foundation. IVI defines standards for instrument drivers that offer benefits to provide higher performance. These benefits include instrument interchangeability, instrument simulation, and instrument state-caching. Because instrument drivers are an integral part of a modern test system, IVI promises to provide developers with the tools to increase their system performance significantly. This paper reviews the technical aspects of the IVI specification and the TVI architecture and describes how IVI can help the test system developer improve performance and lower long-term software maintenance costs View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Performance and characteristics of large lithium ion cells with low temperature electrolyte

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 31 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (524 KB)  

    The US Army and Saft have developed a large lithium ion battery to replace the BE-622 silver zinc battery for application for the ITAS System. The Army discovered that using the 1M LiPF6 1EC:1EMC:1DMC electrolyte can meet ITAS low temperature requirements at -40°C and still provide 71% of the room temperature capacity. This is about 40% better than silver zinc at low temperature View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Problem characterization in tracking/fusion algorithm evaluation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 12 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (704 KB)  

    The performance of a tracking/fusion algorithm depends very much on the complexity of the problem. This paper presents an approach for evaluating tracking/fusion algorithms that consider the difficulty of the problem. Evaluation is performed by characterizing the performance of the basic functions of prediction and association. The problem complexity is summarized by means of context metrics. Two context metrics for characterizing prediction and association difficulty are normalized target mobility and normalized target density. These metrics should be presented along with the performance metrics. The context metrics also support more efficient generation of input data for performance evaluation. Simple tests for evaluating basic tracking algorithm functions are presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Intrusion location capability added to synergistic radar technology

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 21 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    There is a new trend in the outdoor security market that demands more precision in identifying the crossing area of an intruder. Often called intrusion location capability, this capability also presents inherent features such as more accuracy in camera pre-set positioning and temporary disabling of sub-zone and individual sensitivity level per sub-zone. However even though market trend demands them, such features must have minimum impact to overall system cost. How the synergistic radar technology can be modified to offer intruder location capability to a sub-zone area as precise as 10% of the total zone length is presented. For a typical zone length of 100 meters, the zone is sub-divided into up to ten equally spaced sub-zones of 10 meters each, giving an intrusion crossing point resolution of 10 meters. Synergistic radar technology can be applied to buried, surface, wall and roof applications. This intrusion location capability also applies to each of these applications View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Batteries for spacecraft, airplanes, and military service - new developments

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 35 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1248 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Intelli-FIELDTM: the next generation electrostatic field disturbance sensor

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (716 KB)  

    Outdoor perimeter volumetric field disturbance sensors must reliably detect perturbations to the field caused by an intruder, while rejecting noise and environmental changes that may be orders of magnitude greater than the target response. Currently, E-Field(R) systems are widely deployed in nuclear, correctional, and industrial sites to provide perimeter security. These systems are effective in rejecting the majority of noise and environmental stimuli through combined fixed attribute threshold comparison techniques. However, some environmental stimuli closely mimic target stimuli, so improved discrimination techniques have been sought. We describe the results of current studies and investigations of electrostatic sensor system response to targets and to various environmental changes. Fundamental principles in the character of sensor response to these varied stimuli are discussed. Techniques and methods that may be used to exploit the difference between intruder and environmental responses, while using cost-effective discrimination methods, are described. We show how the new Intelli-FIELD system was created, using currently available technologies, to provide both excellent detection properties, and an extremely low nuisance alarm rate, while, at the same time, greatly simplifying installation, calibration, and maintenance. The details of the new system hardware components and test results from initial field installations are described. A comparison of field performance with the previous E-Field product is provided to indicate the advantages of this new sensor technology View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Proposal to TPS delivery in 4 months?

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (596 KB)  

    Decreasing the often lengthy Test Program Set (TPS) development time is a high priority for both DoD and commercial industry. A protracted test development time for a commercial product can make or break its success. It can impact time-to-market goals for a product, which in turn, can result in a loss of market share. Though the DoD world has different objectives, they, too, are concerned with long test development times which can increase costs and jeopardize a weapon system's mission readiness. The case study for this paper is a test system developed by BAE Systems in less than four months to meet a commercial customer's stringent schedule requirements. The factors that contributed to the success of this project are examined, as is their relevance to the DoD world. The desire is to apply relevant lessons learned from the commercial industry to DoD programs, yielding a decrease in TPS development time View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On-the-job training mastery test development

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 18 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    The effectiveness of the national aviation security system is highly dependent upon people, especially those employed as checkpoint screeners. The training of these individuals is critical to their performance on the job. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is very interested in enhancing screener training and further improving their readiness for the job. The FAA's aviation security human factors program has developed and assisted in the development of a number of tests and training tools to aid in the selection and training of screeners. Now the program is concentrating on the development of an on-the-job training mastery test to ensure that screener candidates have acquired all of the checkpoint operations skills and abilities needed to be a successful checkpoint screener View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com