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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date March 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • PLANS 2000 position location and navigation symposium

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 21 - 25
    Cited by:  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (770 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • In memorium: Alfred J. Gross wireless radio system pioneer

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 43 - 44
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An outsider's [re]view of the jubilee issue of the IEEE aerospace and electronic systems magazine [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 45 - 46
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Hybrid electric vehicles: year 2000 status

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 15 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1064 KB)  

    In the year 2000, the automotive manufacturers turned their attention to Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV). This re-direction of Electric Vehicle (EV) development effort was highlighted at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS 2000), where, the World's major automobile manufacturers displayed twenty three HEVs. Thirteen HEV were configured with an internal combustion piston engine and electric traction motor, while, ten additional HEV were configured as fuel cell and battery pack hybrid vehicles (FCHV). Furthermore, the FCHV were fueled with hydrogen (H2) from H2 absorption metal hydride fuel tanks, or, from liquified hydrogen cryogenic fuel tanks. One conclusion for HEV was that the preferred configuration includes a compression ignition engine paired with an electric motor, and, four speed manual transmission with automatic shift. A second conclusion for FCHV was that the fuel of choice is H2, and furthermore, these H2 fueled FCHV were the precursor vehicles foreshadowing deployment of a hydrogen fuel infrastructure within the first quarter of the 21st Century View full abstract»

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  • A statistical overview of recent literature in information fusion

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 7 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB)  

    The objective of this paper is to make a picture of the recent articles published on information fusion. Indeed, a great number of documents dealing with this technique are available in the literature. A classification scheme including application fields, fusion goals, fusion system architecture and mathematical tools is proposed. This overview of the last three years allows us to compute the article distribution into each class. Finally, some elements of preliminary analysis of this classification are drawn View full abstract»

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  • AMTEC electrochemical heat-to electricity conversion defies second law

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 37 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB)  

    Sacred among the mechanical engineers is the “second law of thermodynamics,” which defines the maximum possible efficiency of an engine that converts thermal energy into mechanical power. The second law value is the difference between the engine's heat-source temperature and its heat-sink temperature, divided by the absolute value of the engine's heat-source temperature. For example, an engine setting on 0° C ice and running on steam from 100°C boiling water is not allowed to have more than 26.8% efficiency. Power-generating violators of the second law efficiency-limit range from horses to fuel cells. They do not burn fuel to generate mechanical or electrical power. The latest second law violator is the alkali-metal thermal-to-electric converter. Its efficiency approaches 25 percent. AMTEC cells and their variations were the topics of 12 papers at the 35th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) in July 2000 View full abstract»

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  • Micro-power Amtec systems

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 33 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    There are several terrestrial applications for energy conversion systems with electrical outputs of a few volts in the power range from hundreds of milliwatts to a few watts. Potential applications include: power for instrumentation, communication and device actuation in severe or harsh environments, as well as a variety of low duty cycle monitoring tasks for the military. For cost and/or packaging reasons, some of these applications are severely heat source limited. In this paper we describe the development and performance of AMTEC systems capable of producing 0.3 to 0.5 watts from a radioisotope heat source limited to a total thermal output of less than 4 watts, The approach utilizes a new “chimney cell” design and a thermal insulation system consisting of a specialized multi-layer insulation (MLI) package in combination with fibrous insulation. The cell operates at 0.4 Wc to over 0.5 Wc with an input surface temperature of 700°C. Measurements of the thermal performance of a readily manufactured MLI package indicate that operation at these temperatures will be achievable with a total heat input of ~4 Wth View full abstract»

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  • Design and technology of compact high-power converters

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 27 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    New material technologies such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) are promising in the development of compact high-power converters for next-generation power electronics applications. This paper presents an optimized converter design approach that takes into consideration non-linear interactions among various converter components, source and load. It is shown that with the development of high-temperature, high-power SiC power module technology, magnetic components and capacitors become important technology challenges, and cannot be ignored. A 50% improvement in power density is calculated for a 100 V-2 kV, 7 kW SiC DC-DC power converter operating at 150°C compared to a silicon power converter. The SiC power converter can be operated at junction temperatures in excess of 300°C (as compared to 150°C for a silicon power converter) with reasonable efficiency that potentially leads to a significant reduction in thermal management View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
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