Volume 37 Issue 11 • Nov. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Internet ethics [Books]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):15 - 16
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Database nation; the death of privacy in the 21st century [Books]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):16 - 18
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Understanding the human genome

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):33 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (291 KB)

    At least since Alan Turing tackled Enigma in World War II, building machines to crack codes has been the domain of computer scientists and engineers. Lately they have joined biologists in cracking humanity's most important code-the human genome, the complete set of all our genetic information. Sequencing the human genome is essentially putting in order the over 3 billion chemical units that encode... View full abstract»

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  • Gene sequencing's industrial revolution

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):36 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (558 KB)

    The International Human Genome Project and the private genomics company, Celera Cenomics, of Rockland, Md., plan to publish the first draft of the entire human gene sequence early next year. This has been a top flight engineering achievement. A single DNA sequencing machine today can produce over 330,000 bases (units of sequence information) per day, more than 100 researchers could manage in a yea... View full abstract»

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  • Chip detectives [reverse engineering]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):43 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4000 KB)

    The chip industry is finding new uses for reverse engineering-to defend patents, spur innovation, and trace product failures. Intellectual property negotiations rely on technical ammunition, and over the last decade or so, a handful of laboratories specializing in IC reverse engineering (including Taeus) have sprung up to provide it. As their clients will attest, the ability of these labs to disse... View full abstract»

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  • NASA's big push for the space station

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):49 - 54
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB)

    While concerned about the risks, most space experts who talked privately agreed that further waiting would be unlikely to reduce risks; it was time to do a shakedown under real night conditions. Because of the orbital stability of the space station and the presence of the fully functioning Russian modules, the actual threat of vehicle or crew loss due to hardware and software problems is lower tha... View full abstract»

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  • Shielding grids from solar storms [power system protection]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):55 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (426 KB)

    The authors describe how geomagnetic disturbances are a real danger to some power grids and detail how being prepared for one requires an assessment of local conditions, as well as monitoring and warning systems. View full abstract»

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  • Bluetooth's slow dawn

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):61 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (11)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (107 KB)

    Bluetooth was developed initially by Ericsson as a short-range cable replacement for linking portable consumer electronic products, but it can also be adapted for printers, fax machines, keyboards, toys, games, and virtually any other digital consumer application. The technology provides a mechanism for forming small wireless networks of Bluetooth-equipped products on an ad hoc basis. It can also ... View full abstract»

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  • Calibration ensures accuracy

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):66 - 69
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB)

    Computer-based measurement devices, like their traditional instruments, require periodic internal and external calibration to ensure their adherence to their stated and expected accuracy specifications. A properly-designed device should offer tools and services that enable users to perform hands-free internal calibration, as well as hands-free external calibration by metrologists. View full abstract»

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