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Robotics & Automation Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date March 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Robots on the web [Guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Internet robots: a new robotics niche

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 27 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (33)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)  

    Web robots are a concept that has captured the interest of researchers and developers. Their potential is being investigated at the University of Western Australia, where a six-axis robot has been made teleoperable over the World Wide Web. The site has been active since September 1994 and the robot has also been exhibited at the Australian National Science and Technology Centre in Canberra. Someone considering offering services with this technology will be interested in which groups of people find it attractive, the level of commitment that operators show, and how the robot users behave. These questions are addressed in the article with some demographic data on operators, an analysis of how long they remain interested, and an examination of how long they will wait to access the service. The user interface affects operator behavior, so some interface variations and their effect on operator actions are considered. The opportunities presented, likely application areas, and the potential for generating an income are examined View full abstract»

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  • The Mercury Project: a feasibility study for Internet robots

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 35 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (35)
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    Initiated at CERN in 1992, the World Wide Web provides a standard graphical interface to the Internet, and the number of users worldwide has grown exponentially in the last few years. In the Spring of 1994, we conjectured that it might be possible to offer public access to a teleoperated robot via the WWW. As a feasibility study in 1994, we built a system that allows a robot manipulator to be teleoperated via the Internet. Although the field of teleoperation dates back over 50 years, HTTP provides a low-cost and widely available interface that can make teleoperated resources accessible to a broad range of users. The Mercury Project consisted of an industrial robot arm fitted with a CCD camera and a pneumatic system. We placed a sandbox filled with buried artifacts in the robot workspace. Novice users remotely moved the camera to view desired locations and directed short bursts of compressed air into the sand to view the newly cleared regions. To our knowledge, the Mercury Project was the first Internet robot. It was available almost continuously from August 1994 through March 1995 and was accessed by over 50,000 unique hosts. The article focuses on the interface design, robot hardware, and architecture of the system View full abstract»

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  • Web interfaces for mobile robots in public places

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 48 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (37)  |  Patents (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (444 KB)  

    The growth of the World Wide Web provides unique opportunities to bring robots closer to people. The vision behind such endeavors ranges from relatively simple web-based inspections and surveillance applications to highly versatile applications that use robots connected to the web to establish a remote telepresence in dynamic and populated environments. In the latter scenario, robots play the role of a physical mediator, enabling remote people to acquire information, explore, manipulate, communicate, and interact physically with people far away. The article describes a series of web interfaces designed to remotely operate mobile robots in public places through the web. The design of these interfaces specifically addresses issues such as low bandwidth of interconnections, control brokering, and shared control as well as interaction with people in the robot's environment, which arise naturally in applications with web-based robot control. The interfaces have been tested extensively using two deployed service robots, which were installed as interactive tour guides in two museums. The article also discusses trade-offs and limitations of web-based robots that interact with people in populated public places View full abstract»

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  • How will a robot change your life?

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 57 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    Any way you look at it, the robot has an exciting future. Soon, we can expect the robot to move out of the factory and enter the domestic and business worlds. The domestic robot will appear in the home as an electronic pet and soon will develop the ability to perform useful tasks there. The sensory ability of all robots will greatly improve. In the long run, robots will acquire the capabilities they have been described as having in the movies and science fiction books. Self-reproducing factories may be placed on the moon or on other planets to help meet our growing needs for energy and goods. Inspirational changes are on the way as robots become the helpers that humans have always dreamed of View full abstract»

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  • KhepOnTheWeb: open access to a mobile robot on the Internet

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 41 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (38)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    For years research has focused on ways to allow remote access via standard communication networks to unique or expensive structures. With the growth of the Internet, one finds more and more devices connected to it. Despite the fact that one may spy on other people with hundreds of cameras, it is currently possible to interact only with a few robots, which often have restricted access. To use a camera over the web, the user usually just sits and watches or sometimes has the ability to choose different camera orientation/views. With a robot, you have strong interaction. For instance, with a mobile robot equipped with an arm you can move along the floor and grasp objects. Discovering the control interface, the user has to understand rapidly the goal of the site and what the possibilities of the robot are in order to achieve them. The article analyses one year of netsurfer behavior regarding the use of KhepOnTheWeb, which was realized to demonstrate some possibilities of remote control of a Khepera mobile robot. After one year of access, we performed an analysis of the log files in order to understand the behavior of the public facing such an installation. This analysis was rather difficult because of the large amount of data involved, and specific software was developed in order to extract and present the relevant information. The goal of the project is presented, the hardware and software components of our robot installation are described, and the analysis of the web server log files is discussed. We also introduce another concept of a remote-controlled robot on the web View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine is a unique technology publication which is peer-reviewed, readable and substantive.  The Magazine is a forum for articles which fall between the academic and theoretical orientation of scholarly journals and vendor sponsored trade publications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Eugenio Guglielmelli
Laboratory of Biomedical Robotics
      and Biomicrosystems
Universita' Campus Bio-Medico
      di Roma